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Submission + - Adobe Warns of Flash, Reader, Acrobat 0day

An anonymous reader writes: Adobe Systems Inc. warned late Friday that malicious hackers are exploiting a previously unknown security hole present in current versions of its Adobe Reader, Acrobat and Flash Player software, writes Adobe said the vulnerability exists in Flash Player and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Solaris operating systems, and a component (authplay.dll) of Adobe Reader and Acrobat versions 9.x for Windows, Mac and UNIX operating systems. The Adobe advisory is light on details but suggests Flash users upgrade to new release candidate 10 and to disable or delete the vulnerable component in Reader and/or Acrobat.

Submission + - NSF Censors US Poll on Evolution, Big Bang (

eldavojohn writes: Just how likely is it that an American accepts the idea that humans evolved from earlier species or that the universe started with a big bang? How about that data compared with citizens of the rest of the world? The results were apparently best left out of a report on indicators of our understanding of science released by the National Science Foundation (overseen by the National Science Board). This omission in 2010's Science and Engineering Indicators, understandably, drew criticism from a number of scientists and even the White House but the figures were released: '45% of Americans in 2008 answered true to the statement, "Human beings, as we know them today, developed from earlier species of animals." The figure is similar to previous years and much lower than in Japan (78%), Europe (70%), China (69%), and South Korea (64%). The same gap exists for the response to a second statement, "The universe began with a big explosion," with which only 33% of Americans agreed.' Louis Lanzerotti, an astrophysicist at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and chair of the board who decided to omit these numbers, claimed that the questions (which have been in use for 25 years by the way) were "flawed indicators of scientific knowledge because responses conflated knowledge and beliefs." I guess our understanding of science can only be measured as long as it doesn't threaten a given religion or perhaps ignorance is a very painful thing to admit to. Let's hope that none of these questions revolve around math, a form of witchcraft that my god explicitly forbids.

Venezuela Bans Hostile Videogames and Toys 335

An anonymous reader writes "In an effort to 'help improve child education and prevent misconduct,' the Venezuelan government began enforcing a law on March 3rd banning war videogames and toys, imposing a fine and 2.5 years in prison on the production, distribution, sale, hiring and use of video games and toys inciting violent behavior. Alberto Federico Ravell, former director of opposing news network Globovision, has already come on twitter denouncing the authorities for seizing imported Gameboy, Wii and PlayStation 3 consoles, due to considering them violent."

Submission + - Blizzard adds timestamps to armory (

Kharny writes: In a move that could cause quite serious privacy problems, blizzard added timestamps and a rss feed to world of warcraft characters in their online armory. This new feature will mean that anyone can follow "realtime" developements in a world of warcraft character, and if the user behind the character would be know, even add time and date to playing habits. Many players have already complained about the fact that there is no opt-out option and this opens very big possibilities for online stalking.

MiFi Attack Exploits GPS To Reveal User's Location 62

An anonymous reader writes "Security researcher Adam Baldwin has identified that the Sprint and Verizon MiFi devices are vulnerable to a multitude of attacks. Combining these attacks together, an attacker can gain the GPS location of the MiFi device without the user becoming immediately aware. The attack can be successfully executed without authentication and even if the GPS has been disabled by the administrator." There's a video, but a handy text summary, too. Upshot: "Any MiFi user that visits a specially crafted page will give up their GPS location to the attacker."

Dad Delivers Baby Using Wiki Screenshot-sm 249

sonamchauhan writes "A Londoner helped his wife deliver their baby by Googling 'how to deliver a baby' on his mobile phone. From the article: 'Today proud Mr Smith said: "The midwife had checked Emma earlier in the day but contractions started up again at about 8pm so we called the midwife to come back. But then everything happened so quickly I realized Emma was going to give birth. I wasn't sure what I was going to do so I just looked up the instructions on the internet using my BlackBerry."'"

Cell Phone Searches Require Warrant 161

schleprock63 writes "The Ohio state supreme court has decided that a cell phone found on a suspect cannot be searched without a warrant. The majority based this decision on a federal case that deemed a cell phone not to be a 'closed container,' and therefore not searchable without a warrant. The argument of the majority contended that a cell phone does not contain physical objects and therefore is not a container. One dissenting judge argued that a cell phone is a container that simply contains data. He argued that the other judges were 'needlessly theorizing' about the contents of a cell phone. He compared the data contained within an address book that would be searchable." The article notes that this was apparently the first time the question has come up before any state supreme court.

Aussie Scientists Find Coconut-Carrying Octopus 205

An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from an AP report: "Australian scientists have discovered an octopus in Indonesia that collects coconut shells for shelter — unusually sophisticated behavior that the researchers believe is the first evidence of tool use in an invertebrate animal. The scientists filmed the veined octopus, Amphioctopus marginatus, selecting halved coconut shells from the sea floor, emptying them out, carrying them under their bodies up to 65 feet (20 meters), and assembling two shells together to make a spherical hiding spot. ... 'I was gobsmacked,' said Finn, a research biologist at the museum who specializes in cephalopods. 'I mean, I've seen a lot of octopuses hiding in shells, but I've never seen one that grabs it up and jogs across the sea floor. I was trying hard not to laugh.'"

Middle-School Strip Search Ruled Unconstitutional 528

yuna49 writes "The US Supreme Court today ruled 8-1 that the strip search of a 13-year-old girl by officials in an Arizona middle school was unconstitutional. However, by a vote of 7-2, the Court also ruled that the individual school officials could not be held personally liable. A suit for damages against the school district itself is still going forward. We discussed this case at length back in March when the Court decided to hear the case on appeal."

Australian Web Filter To Censor Downloaded Games 200

Xiroth writes "The Australian Federal Communications Ministry has confirmed that they intend to use the planned filter to block the download of games that have been refused by Australia's classification authority, the OFLC. As an Electronic Frontiers Australia spokesman noted, 'This is confirmation that the scope of the mandatory censorship scheme will keep on creeping.'"

Be careful when a loop exits to the same place from side and bottom.