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Comment: Re:Lisp, Forth, APL, J, Prolog, PostScript (Score 1) 387

by khb (#47862679) Attached to: Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

APL and J are useful for doing the sort of ad hoc big data analysis that R is also popular for.

The speed (or lack thereof) of your terminal isn't really the issue, its being able to think in matrix/vector transformations. A skill which is actually more important today than 40 years ago.

Comment: Re:Mainframe Programmers (Score 2) 387

by khb (#47862657) Attached to: Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

"...access to a mainframe system"....

Well, there is more than one kind of mainframe, and they aren't much alike. But let's assume you really mean IBM zSeries. You have several options:

1) Take a course. Many schools have IBM sponsored classes with access provided.
2) Find a copy of the "Hercules" emulate http://www.hercules-390.org/
3) Sign up for ANY university class to become a "student" and apply to IBM http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/...

Also note the growing popularity of Linux on zSeries systems, so your Linux skills can be directly applied.

Comment: Clearly there IS a question (Score 1) 506

by khb (#47758569) Attached to: California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

90% of accidents (or more, depending on the study) are due to human error. So the DMV insistence on putting the humans back into the drivers seat is actually counterproductive. "there's no question when it comes down to the safety of those on the road." ... the question is are the other humans on the road more or less safe with the google vehicle operators able to override the computer?

While I'm not interested in being an early adopter of this or most automotive technologies, there are lots of questions when it comes to safety. It is a pity that government hardly ever uses science or logic in the decision making.

Comment: What was the performance impact? (Score 1) 1

by khb (#47756509) Attached to: gcc LTO reduces firefox package size by 50%

The "article" is just a pointer to the bugtracker entry which is good but lacks any clues as to measured performance.

LTO has been a win in commercial workflows for many years. Obviously it can be an obstacle for debugging (when entire call trees are eliminated or collapsed single stepping in the debugger is problematic) and if build times become excessive the results may not be worth the cost.

But in the end the real payoff is runtime. Without impressive speed ups for user critical to acceptability operations it is just air guitar!

Comment: Consider Unix (Score 1) 826

by khb (#47751311) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Compare and contrast SysV init vs Solaris SMF. Not that systemd is SMF but there are real Enterprise class problems with the more traditional model. And systemd developers aren't the first to notice them.

I haven't looked closely enough to have an informed opinion about how good the systemd solution is, but SMF on Solaris is vastly better than the situation in older SunOS system I've dealt with over the years

Comment: Complete nonsense.... (Score 1) 199

by khb (#47285801) Attached to: Overeager Compilers Can Open Security Holes In Your Code

"...decide it's an error.."

No, it is an "optimizing" compiler not a "correcting" compiler. The optimizer can detect that no language defined semantic will be changed by removing the code, so it does. As others have noted, "volatile" is the fix for this particular coding / compiler blunder. However ill-defined, it is *not an error*.

As for the folks commenting that only C can run in small embedded processors that's hogwash. Huge mainframes of the early ages had smaller memory sizes and ran FORTRAN (now Fortran, but then it was all caps), COBOL, PL/I (and .8 for IBM internals), Algol and other languages. Most made entire classes of C blunders impossible, and there is no fundamental reason why we couldn't go back to safer languages for embedded programming (and good reasons why we ought to; not that I expect we shall).

Comment: Why? (Score 2) 218

by khb (#47275947) Attached to: It's Not a Car, It's a Self-Balancing Electric Motorcycle (Video)

The gyos add complexity, and dropping a third wheel doesn't save that much space. See Riley's classic http://www.amazon.com/Alternat... or just search for some of his existing designs.

As a previous owner of a Sparrow, I wish these guys luck. Unfortunately, I need a three seater ...my trusty (actual) motorcycle sits idle since I've too often got to worry about hauling two kids these days.

Comment: Re: $150 MRC for hotspot that doesn't travel with (Score 1) 216

by khb (#46986865) Attached to: GM Sees a Market For $5/Day Dedicated In-Car Internet

"... No one owns a car for 10 or 20 years anymore..."

Each of my Hondas have done at least 10 years. My 1996 Acura is still quite healthy. My 1987 Shadow as well.

I suspect that no one who reads /. Is in the target demographic. It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Comment: Re: $150 MRC for hotspot that doesn't travel with (Score 1) 216

by khb (#46986863) Attached to: GM Sees a Market For $5/Day Dedicated In-Car Internet

"... No one owns a car for 10 or 20 years anymore..."

Each of my Hondas have done at least 10 years. My 1996 Acura is still quit healthy. My 1987 Shadow as well.

I suspect that no one who reads /. Is in the target demographic. It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Comment: Re:You know what worked better for me then longhan (Score 1) 191

Indeed. In one of my first college courses we were permitted to take notes in the (very small) margin of the text itself. This led to focus on the instructor and very small amounts of note taking.

In High School I took more notes and learned less.

The best situation was where I took little or not notes, but paid one of the transcribers for the hearing impaired for their professional notes (in those dark days before professors provided pointers to their web page ;>). I focused on the lecture, and a professional took notes. I wound up not using the professional notes all that much (usually it repeated things in the text book ... but for the one time in a hundred that material wasn't in the textbook AND was on the test ... it was invaluable ;>).

The other "trick" was to write notes immediately *after* class. While precise dates and fiddly facts weren't recorded, the overall structure of the lecture and the immediate impressions I formed were there for the recording. This has proved useful in the many years since ... recording the gist of discussions (if I can't remember it 10 minutes after the meeting, it probably wasn't terribly important) ... and sending them out as minutes (soliciting corrections from attendees) is usually far more effective than recording and ignoring the mp3 when trying to figure out at what meeting we went down the wrong algorithmic path ;>

...when fits of creativity run strong, more than one programmer or writer has been known to abandon the desktop for the more spacious floor. - Fred Brooks, Jr.

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