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Comment: Re:Christmas is coming early this year (Score 1) 683

by khasim (#47401445) Attached to: TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes

Take away the security and you don't even need "smart" or "poised".

No one is saying that there should not be any security.

Keep security static and you don't need smart people - just enough attempts from dullards until they chance upon a workaround, the way penicillin eventually adapts to an antibiotic.

You might want to review that. And the "dullards" still need a basic level of competence. And that basic level of competence is what is extremely rare.

But not non-existent, as history has shown.

And it will never be "non-existent". Ever. As long as airplanes are still used. So putting "non-existent" as a criteria means that you will always fail.

And you will never know if the money being spent is not being wasted because there incidents are so rare already.

So your point about "reducing risk" is meaningless.

Comment: Re:Christmas is coming early this year (Score 1) 683

by khasim (#47400637) Attached to: TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes

Think in terms of Venn diagrams: start with "people who want to blow up an airplane".

I'd change that to "people anywhere in the world who want to blow up a plane in the USofA". Which is a large number of people.

But then:

Now add "operatives smart and poised enough to carry out the attack but willing to kill themselves in the process".

Another slight change. "Operatives smart and poised enough to carry out the attack in the USofA but willing to ...". This is a very, very, very small number.

You don't need any of the other qualifiers because with just those two criteria you've reduced the number to almost non-existence.

So the problem would be to find someone who fit the "smart and poised" category. Once that person is found, you can teach him/her whatever is needed from a technical standpoint.

It's not insanity - it's all about reducing risk.

I disagree. The risk is already almost non-existent. Causing more difficulties for non-threat people will not reduce the risk any further.

Comment: Re:So post the info here. (Score 1) 401

by khasim (#47396555) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

I think you've missed the point.

I think I nailed the point. YOU claim that YOU cannot find people to hire for a position that YOU cannot identify or even characterize. Is it programming? Is it networking?

There is no glut of competent workers.

Any yet YOU cannot characterize the position that YOU claim YOU have open except:

I'm not even looking for particular skills or experience. Just people who are genuinely into technology.

So you will train people who are not currently qualified ... but there isn't anyone who is qualified.

Not all businesses allow you to post jobs to Slashdot, although I suppose I could lobby to change that internally.

If you're running the ad on Dice or someplace then post a LINK to that posting.

You are quick to claim that you cannot find qualified people (even though you'd train someone who was not qualified) but rather reticent to post any information about the opening you claim to have.

That's suspicious.

You're statement about narrowing my search is also part of the problem with this industry. A good engineer can work on almost anything.

No. A good automotive engineer CANNOT design a bridge as well as a good civil engineer. And neither of those are electrical engineers.

And someone looking for a programmer would NOT have any problem stating that AND what language(s).

Comment: So post the info here. (Score 2) 401

by khasim (#47396077) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

I've been trying to hire developers for multiple high-compensation positions in NYC.

So post it here.

Truly smart/capable/motivated people are not looking for jobs. They are already employed.

Yes. Usually. So you have to offer them something MORE than they have at their current job to make them willing to take a risk on a new job.

I'm not even looking for particular skills or experience. Just people who are genuinely into technology.

Yeah. You might want to re-evaluate your criteria.

At least narrow it down to whether you're looking for a programmer or a CCIE. Is this about writing drivers? Or programming EPROM chips? Or iPhone games? Or encryption? SatNav?

Comment: Re:Waste of time (Score 2) 131

by khasim (#47377373) Attached to: Employees Staying Away From Internal Corporate Social Networks

...(1) the only contributors are employees with time on their hands, who tend to be the drones.

Maybe. They do need extra time to type something up that can be read the way they intended it.

Those employees who actually know someting useful to you are too busy to waste time with crap like this

I'd say it was because the people with the knowledge are busy applying that knowledge to the issues that have arisen that affect X people. Do they have time to type a reply to your question if your question isn't shared by X other people?

We've all had to wade through different forums looking for answers where there are thousands of threads NOT related to what YOU are having a problem with.

And no one thinks about the problem the same way YOU do. I cannot print. Why? Because I changed my password and forgot it and cannot login to get the document to print it. So it is a printing problem.

(2) the only employees who will tell you anything at all are ones you have actually met face to face - otherwise you are not a real person, and they don't trust you, no matter what you say.

I've seen this in action and it annoys me. The people who get their problems addressed are the people who:

a. Have the time to camp out next to someone until that someone fixes their problem.

b. Have a manager who can demand that the other manager re-allocate their workers' time to fix the problem.

c. Have already established a friendship with the person who can fix the problem. I brought cookies for you! Hope you like them. By the way, there's a small problem with the X. Could you look at it sometime?

Comment: Re:besides that (Score 2) 131

by khasim (#47377247) Attached to: Employees Staying Away From Internal Corporate Social Networks

Employers can read your emails, so having a 'conversation' on a social tool should not be a problem as long as you don't include stuff you wouldn't include in a meeting or email.

But that is the problem. There are already different avenues for that same professional interaction.

If you want a permanent record of something you write it down and submit it to management.

If you want a permanent record of the discussion of something you put it in email.

If you do NOT want a permanent record then you meet in person. Or use a phone that the company does not control (record).

They are really to do work related stuff,explore ideas and share information.

That's too much of mixing the informal with the formal. And leaving a permanent trail. People can already do that at the water-cooler or coffee machine WITHOUT it becoming a permanent record at HR. And if someone is remote you can always include them on speaker-phone.

Comment: Re:besides that (Score 1) 131

by khasim (#47376873) Attached to: Employees Staying Away From Internal Corporate Social Networks

Think about the things you do and say with your friends AFTER work.

How many of those things would you want to personally document for your boss (and his boss and his boss ...)?

So when those interesting things are absent from the "social" media part it becomes just another boring means for management to distribute work-related material. Just like all those boring "team meetings" that you are forced to attend. Where the exact same material will be covered AGAIN for anyone who did not read the internal site.

Comment: Re:Not the same. (Score 0) 1316

by khasim (#47355805) Attached to: U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

Condom breaks and the woman ... Too bad asshole, ... lied about being on pills.

Okay. It seems that you have some other issues than the subject at hand. You might want to take them off-line.

And what stops her from seeing the regular doc then getting the script filled at a clinic?

Doesn't that sort of depend upon the location of the free clinic? And what hours it is available? And whether she has to go through any protesters to get inside?

And whether this ruling can be interpreted to allow a company to refuse coverage for the doctor visit to prescribe the pills?

My insurance company isn't giving me free condoms, and I don't have any get out of jail free cards made available to me if my birth control fails.

I think that your side issues are becoming a problem with your ability to discuss the main issue.

Comment: Statistics. (Score 1) 1316

by khasim (#47355639) Attached to: U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

The insurance companies charge different rates for different demographics because the insurance companies have the statistics to back up their pricing.

Insurance is heavily regulated at the federal and state level. If the insurance companies are charging demographic X more than demographic Y they had to provide evidence based upon statistics that showed X is involved in more accidents or more costly accidents than Y.

Comment: Not the same. (Score 1) 1316

by khasim (#47355535) Attached to: U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

Getting hormonal birth control from a doctor other than your regular doctor means that those two doctors have to both have access to your medical records or both consult on any issues you might have.

Different pills have different effects (and side effects) on different women.

The only time it makes sense for a woman to get hormonal birth control from a free clinic is when that is her only source of non-emergency medical care.

Comment: Re:Obama's police state? (Score 5, Insightful) 272

by khasim (#47175451) Attached to: US Marshals Seize Police Stingray Records To Keep Them From the ACLU

Are they "true believers" who really managed to convince themselves this is all for some kind of nebulous greater good?

Pretty much.

There's a degree of self-serving included. They work for the government so any attempt to reveal what they do and how they do it is an attack on them.

And if you're attacking them, that makes you the "bad guy". And they have to stop the "bad guys".

Comment: Re:Annoying. (Score 4, Insightful) 347

So in effect you want to nationalize the internet backbone and put all backbone providers out of business.

I think you are a little bit confused on what the "backbone" is. It is not the same as the "last mile" which is what I am discussing.

In my suggestion, each of the ISP's that were leasing space would also need a connection to an "upstream" provider. Whether that was one of the backbones or an intermediary would be up to each company.

All the government does is provide access to the pipes from the government site to the houses.

Comment: Annoying. (Score 5, Insightful) 347

The core issue is whether a government should be providing a service. But that should not be an issue.

The government should provide the pipes (fibre or copper or whatever) to the houses that it covers. Paid for by taxes.

The pipes terminate at a government facility that the government leases space at to ANY AND ALL companies that want to provide ISP services over those pipes. As cheap as possible but without allowing one company to lease ALL the space.

Then switching between ISP's should be as simple as moving a patch cord.

Your taxes pay for the pipes and their maintenance and the facility and its maintenance (minus the lease revenue).

Comment: Re:Sigh (Score 5, Insightful) 147

by khasim (#47111109) Attached to: Virtual DVDs, Revisited

If you don't like a article, skip it.

Or you can present counter-points to explain WHY you did not like the article. Such as these:

1. Bennett Haselton is focusing on NetFlix. Whether his idea matches the business model that NetFlix has chosen OR NOT.

2. Bennett Haselton is focusing on the media players that he owns. Combine that with #1 and you have a very narrow complaint about a very niche service not being offered by a specific company that may not want that as their business model.

3. Bennett Haselton ignores the LEGAL ISSUES with his fantasy of a specific company offering a specific service for his specific devices.

4. Bennett Haselton is continuing on this tirade despite having been answered in his previous tirades.

For every bloke who makes his mark, there's half a dozen waiting to rub it out. -- Andy Capp

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