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Comment: Re:If and only if (Score 1) 578

by khallow (#48464619) Attached to: Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

Ah, the ostrich algorithm.

This is the sort of situation where one should consider the "ostrich" algorithm: high present day cost to mitigate unknown distant future cost. It doesn't always make sense to anticipate future problems, especially when you can just let those future problems sort themselves out.

For example, we know we're all going to die and it's far more likely to be a very painful way to go, if we don't control how we die. As a result, should you painlessly kill yourself now so you don't have to worry about dying later in a much more painful way? Ostrich algorithm works when you realize you have goals in your life other than avoiding a painful death.

I'm not calling for a complete abandonment of any sort of planning or insuring against future risk. Just be sensible about it and keep those options open. Here, the ostrich strategy continues to grow the global economy. So even if it should turn out that global warming or some other climate change problem is bad, we'll be wealthier and more able to deal with the problem.

Comment: Re:Number of interviews... (Score 1) 402

by khallow (#48459515) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

Try performing a quick sort, or any high level maths sort in the real world it would take you years to sort that 1000 item list.

Again, you have to adapt the methods to your particular computer. Not all sort algorithms are equal in this regard. It's not that hard to find an O(Nlog(N)) algorithm or hybrid algorithm that works manually.

but I would argue, in this case using a computer that is so fundamentally different will require a complete rewrite and a completely different approach.

That turned out to be false as jbolden demonstrated.

Comment: Re:If and only if (Score 1) 578

by khallow (#48459241) Attached to: Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

This is a flawed idea in that just refuses to consider political action in response. When you can't imagine a government putting the externalized costs of fossil fuels on fossil fuel consumers, this conclusion is a natural one.

Sure, we can implement behavior changes via political action. But why should we? Also, fossil fuels also have externalized benefits such as cheaper everything due to lower transportation costs. My view is that there isn't a particularly good reason to act right now. But with a few decades of experience we should be able to tell if global warming is a serious problem or not. That should also give us a good idea how long we can push the various fossil fuel industries and may even obsolete a few of the uses for fossil fuels.

Comment: Re:Duh (Score 3, Informative) 402

by khallow (#48457285) Attached to: Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

So by open market you mean protected local labor market?

Reread the previous post. Nothing about reducing H1-Bs. Maybe that's the end game for the previous poster, but greatly reducing the indentured servitude aspect of an H1-B visa (especially while saying nothing about reducing the number of H1-Bs!) doesn't restrict the labor pool.

Comment: Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (Score 1) 453

by khallow (#48455283) Attached to: In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

[...] the crash would be listed as "alcohol involved" and "speed related", despite neither of those being the cause.

Neither driver would be intoxicated.

That's a lie. I've not seen anyone state that, and certainly not me.

In my original quote which you first replied to:

If we are still going to have human drivers, then we will need more road capacity, more safety feature, heavier and more expensive cars to withstand accidents, etc.

Moving on:

Most of the rest of us are pointing out the benefit that it will greatly increase road capacity.

Unless it doesn't actually do that.

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler." -- Albert Einstein

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