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Comment: Correction on several inaccuracies (Score 5, Interesting) 1034

by kh+ln (#14907435) Attached to: 1001 Islamic Inventions
I read the "Top 20" article and found the following inaccuracies that warrant clarification:
3 A form of chess was played in ancient India but the game was developed into the form we know it today in Persia. From there it spread westward to Europe - where it was introduced by the Moors in Spain in the 10th century - and eastward as far as Japan. The word rook comes from the Persian rukh, which means chariot.
The Indian game mentioned is Pachisi , precursor to the Americanized Parcheesi "Royal Game of India"
14 The system of numbering in use all round the world is probably Indian in origin but the style of the numerals is Arabic and first appears in print in the work of the Muslim mathematicians al-Khwarizmi and al-Kindi around 825...Algorithms and much of the theory of trigonometry came from the Muslim world.
The system of numbering commonly called "Arabic Numerals" is now deprecated, and in fact, reads Hindu Arabic Numerals as the article alludes to. Trigonometry was first discovered much earlier (by nearly 1000 years) by the Indians ,Egyptians, & Greeks. Arab scholars recognized it as a distinct branch 2000 years later.

I note a trend: the Arabs, perhaps because of their geographic location at the crossroads of the East and West, are bound to discover many new and exciting ideas and teaching from their neighbors. They were in pretty good company (Greco-Roman thoughts to the West, Indian thoughts to the East) so they are bound to pick up something.

The universe does not have laws -- it has habits, and habits can be broken.

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