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Comment: Wonder why women are so uncomfortable... (Score 4, Insightful) 572

by kevjava (#29835783) Attached to: Yahoo Offered Lap Dances At Hack Event

in the Information Technology field? This might go some way to explain it.

Did Yahoo not think that women engineers would be present at this event? They make up roughly ten percent of engineers as a whole. Furthermore, did they think that there was some way that women attendees would be perfectly comfortable watching other women objectified on a stage?

It's not that I mind women being objectified for money -- the women involved are handsomely rewarded for their parts in this business deal. I do mind people in my field saying that they do everything they can to make women comfortable in our field, then turning around and saying that they don't understand why anyone would be offended by this.

Comment: Re:Thanks! (Score 4, Insightful) 216

by kevjava (#29266107) Attached to: The Myths of Security

But, the Schneier chapter isn't meant to piss him off, I have no beef with him whatsoever. I just think the fanboys do the world a disservice by not thinking for themselves, especially when they draw from material that's a decade old.

The thing is, you're not convincing me that the book is out of date. There is plenty of material in the Internet that is over a decade old and is still relatively current. I read the Cathedral and the Bazaar for the first time last month, and drew a good amount of benefit from its words, even if I'm not ready to swallow it whole. The Mythical Man Month shed quite a bit of perspective on project management in a field that our industry has fifty or so years of experience in, and yet we still do terribly at.

The principles of cryptography are still the same today as they were in the days of the Roman Empire and the Caesar Cipher, with all the bits about Alice and Bob with Mallory in the middle. Our toys are much more advanced today, and their rate of advance continues to increase, but just what is it that makes our pulling of information from a 10+-year-old book harmful?

I'm no Schneier "fanboy", and haven't actually read the book; I just genuinely want to know.

NASA

+ - NASA is withholding pilot safety survey results

Submitted by
Ranten_N_Raven
Ranten_N_Raven writes "According to Yahoo News, NASA did interviews of airline pilots in 2005 about safety issues. Can't be good news in it, because they have refused to release the results.

Anxious to avoid upsetting air travelers, NASA is withholding results from an unprecedented national survey of pilots that found safety problems like near collisions and runway interference occur far more frequently than the government previously recognized...A senior NASA official, associate administrator Thomas S. Luedtke, said revealing the findings could damage the public's confidence in airlines and affect airline profits.
But don't worry, now, it's being taken care of: NASA is ordering the contractor who did the interviews to 'purge all related data from their computers.'"
The Courts

Groklaw No Front for IBM 206

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the killing-the-messenger dept.
A Groklaw Reader writes "After all the wild speculation SCO put forth about Pamela Jones, her alleged subpoena by SCO, and her recent vacation due to illness, we now have Stephen J. Vaughan-Nichols writing to say 'Yes, there is a PJ.' In his own words, he says, 'Let me address this directly. Yes, Pamela Jones is a real person. I've met her several times [...] I consider her a friend. She is not a front for anyone.' Hopefully, this statement will be enough to put those SCO-induced conspiracy theories to rest."
Censorship

+ - Ethics of proxy servers

Submitted by
Mav
Mav writes "I was recently asked to host a website for free in return for a lot of advertising. After querying them about how they knew the site would produce traffic they stated the site was going to be running PHPProxy (an open source web proxy). The traffic was a result of him and his contacts (nearly one thousand of them) using the site to bypass his school's firewall in order to view their MySpace pages and get access to their MSN messengers. Given all the attention social networking sites have recently received and the various laws attempting to block or control access to them I feel guilty and unsure making this available. Are there legal implications that I need to worry about? Could I be held liable if one of the students got in trouble? Most importantly, what's the moral thing to do?"
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft blasts IBM in open letter

Submitted by carlmenezes
carlmenezes (204187) writes "Arstechnica has an article on Microsoft's open letter to IBM that adds fresh ammunition to the battle of words between those who support Microsoft's Open XML and OpenOffice.org's OpenDocument file formats. Microsoft has strong words for IBM, which it accuses of deliberately trying to sabotage Microsoft's attempt to get Open XML certified as a standard by the ECMA. In the letter, general managers Tom Robertson and Jean Paol write: "When ODF was under consideration, Microsoft made no effort to slow down the process because we recognized customers' interest in the standardization of document formats." In contrast, the authors charge that IBM "led a global campaign" urging that governments and other organizations demand that International Standards Organization (ISO) reject Open XML outright.
Could MS actually be getting a taste of their own medicine?"
Mozilla

+ - Firefox flaw could let sites fake being "trust

Submitted by thirty-seven
thirty-seven (568076) writes "According to an article on the CBC website, a Firefox bug could be exploited to make it look like users are connected to a trusted site when they are not. Apparently, by exploiting a flaw in the way that Firefox manages data written to the browser's "location.hostname" DOM property, a site could manipulate the authentication cookies for trusted websites such as an online bank, thereby appearing trusted itself."
User Journal

SPAM: BTW: Iranian Dates 5

Journal by Jeremiah Cornelius

Like every one in the known universe, Iran represents the date as day/month/year. Everyone, except the US who backwards talk do.

In Iran, it is the year 1385, and they don't use CE dates. Iran also rejects the Arab lunar calandar in favor of the Zoroastrian solar year, basing year zero on the hijira date 0 to define the beginning of the epoch.

Businesses

+ - Terror and Stock Market

Submitted by sas-dot
sas-dot (873348) writes "Terrorist attacks on vital institutions and installations often send stock indexes tumbling in the past. But the scenario is changing fast. Jihadi groups are now floating fictitious companies to manipulate stock markets to generate funds for their operations. India's National Security Advisor (NSA), M K Narayanan warned of similar developments in India citing isolated reports of companies that had come in from the Mumbai and Chennai stock exchanges , some of which were traced to terrorist outfits. IT companies / BPO's could be target and is not far fetching, considering what happen recently a BPO was supporting call services to drug laundering."
Biotech

Stem Cell Research Paper Recalled 112

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the making-the-grade dept.
MattSparkes writes "One of the best-known stem cell papers describes adult cells that seemed to hold the same promise as embryonic stem cells. Now some of the data contained within the paper is being questioned, after staff at a consumer science magazine noticed errors. It shows how even peer-reviewed papers can sometimes 'slip through the net' and get to publication with inaccurate data."
Mozilla

+ - Over 27% of Firefox patches come from volunteers

Submitted by
dolphinling
dolphinling writes "Everyone knows the Mozilla Corporation makes a lot of money and employs a lot of people now. Google has full-time employees working on Firefox too, as do a number of other places. Yet despite that, in the six months up to Firefox 2 "27% of the patches to Firefox and Gecko and other key projects were submitted by key volunteers, [and] those patches represent 24% of changes made to the source code". What's more, those numbers only counted contributers with 50 patches or more, so the actual numbers are probably quite a bit higher. It's good to see that even as Mozilla does so well in the business world, it can still keep its ties to the community so strong."
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Amir Tofangsazan's laptop goes up for sale!

Submitted by
spikytom
spikytom writes "Some of you might remember the story of Amir Tofangsazan, the idiot who sold someone (me) a broken laptop, only to have all the embarrasing photos and content he left on the hard drive posted up on a website when he refused to pay back the money. well, 3.8 million hits later, and i've decided to put the laptop and the website up on ebay, so someone else has the chance to be the proud owner of the world's most famous broken laptop. Here is the link!"
The Internet

+ - Baidu is the Google of China and booming

Submitted by thefickler
thefickler (1030556) writes "Most news services concentrate, when it comes to search engines, on Google. But in China, soon to be the largest Internet market in the world, Google does not really rate. The company to watch is Baidu which is booming.

Chinese Web search leader Baidu says its fourth-quarter net profits quintupled, but cautioned that revenue growth was likely to decelerate sharply in the first quarter of 2007. To look at a statement like that you can easily pass over that word 'quintupled'. As in it became five times bigger. Not even Google in its best quarter came near that."

It is better to give than to lend, and it costs about the same.

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