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Submission + - Study finds fracking chemicals didn't pollute water

RoccamOccam writes: A landmark federal study on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, shows no evidence that chemicals from the natural gas drilling process moved up to contaminate drinking water aquifers at a western Pennsylvania drilling site.

After a year of monitoring, the researchers found that the chemical-laced fluids used to free gas trapped deep below the surface stayed thousands of feet below the shallower areas that supply drinking water.

Submission + - $11 Mistake Costs Couple Slot Machine Jackpot (kdvr.com)

ainandil writes: Engineering mistakes, while frustrating, seldom definitively alter the end user's life. Not so in Cripple Creek Colorado — MaryAnn and Jim McMahon thought their money troubles were over when they hit an $11 million jackpot at a casino Tuesday. Before paying the jackpot, the Wildwood Casino turned the machine over to the Colorado Gaming Division for inspection. A glitch was found, aha! The Wildwood Casino blamed a slot machine malfunction for the $11 million jackpot. Total actually won by the McMahons? $1627.82. ...and you thought you had a bad day.

Submission + - HP: Cow poop can make data centers greener (infoworld.com)

tsamsoniw writes: Colocating a data center and a dairy farm can be mutually beneficial, according to new research from HP. The biogas extracted from the manure of 10,000 cows would be enough to power a 1MW data center — with watts to spare. Meanwhile, the heat waste from the data center could be used on the farm for such uses as helping break down manure for biogas. Beyond the economic benefits, there are the environmental benefits of putting methane — which is 21 times more damaging than CO2 — to good use.

Submission + - New Mac OS X malware variant spotted (zdnet.com)

Pigskin-Referee writes: "Intego is reporting on a newly discovered variant of a Mac OS X malware first detected in 2004.

According to the company, the source code of the OSX/HellRTS.D is already being distributed across multiple forums, which could potentially allow malicious attackers to create new variants of it."


Submission + - Google shows major improvements with Android 2.2 (pcauthority.com.au) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Google has used the I/O developers conference to launch the latest version of its mobile operating system, Android 2.2, codenamed Froyo. Google claims the operating system will be from two to five times faster thanks to advances made in the compilers and the Dalvik virtual machine it uses, and how it is ported to new processors and platforms. On the enterprise front the new operating system comes with full support for Microsoft Exchange, including access to the global address book and the ability to translate native security features to mobile handsets. APIs have also been added to allow controls such as the automatic wiping of missing handsets and other remote management features. Google is also making its voice translation and search APIs open to developers, and showed off an application developed for the handset that allowed real time translation from English to French.

Submission + - Google hit with class-action over Wi-Fi snooping (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: Google's secret Wi-Fi sniffing has prompted a class-action lawsuit that could force the company to pay up to $10,000 for each time it snatched data from unprotected hotspots, court documents show. The lawsuit, which was filed by an Oregon woman and a Washington man in a Portland, Ore. federal court on Monday, accused Google of violating Federal privacy and data acquisition laws. 'When Google created its data collection systems on its GSV [Google Street View] vehicles, it included wireless packet sniffers that, in addition to collecting the user's unique or chosen Wi-Fi network name (SSID information), the unique number given to the user's hardware used to broadcast a user's Wi-Fi signal (MAC address, the GSV data collection systems also collected data consisting of all or part of any documents, e-mails, video, audio, and VoIP information being sent over the network by the user [payload data],' the lawsuit stated. The suit follows requests for the FTC to investigate the snooping, and Germany launching a criminal investigation into the matter.

Submission + - Firefox "king of the hill"? Looks like it maybe. (efactor.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Seems to be a rollercoaster of browser market shares when people comment on browsers and relative market share. This is an interesting comment on "real customer" signups of entrepreneurs on efactor.com, based on Google Analytics. Puts Firefox as No. 1...

Pound for pound, the amoeba is the most vicious animal on earth.