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Television

+ - Norwegian TV airs world's longest show, CC's it->

Submitted by
ketilwaa
ketilwaa writes "Norwegian public broadcaster airs world's longest TV programme, the voyage of the Hurtigruten cruise ship going north between Bergen and Kirkenes. For geeks like me, the FAQ http://nrkbeta.no/2011/06/21/hurtigruten-faq-eng/ contains information that makes this even more exciting: the footage from the front view camera is CC-licensed, and GPS data will be freely avaliable. So far, the stream has been accessed from 90% of the world's countries, making this more than a local story..."
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Comment: Related: Miserware (Score 1) 258

by ketilwaa (#28893753) Attached to: How Wolfram Alpha's Copyright Claims Could Change Software
This reminds me of a piece of proprietary software called Miserware. The original license said you needed permission to publish data reported by Miserware. After some rumblings, they issued this e-mail:

Dear MicroMiser beta participant,

Thank you for your involvement in the MicroMiser beta! The response so far has been tremendous and well beyond our expectations. The information we are getting when you run the mw-feedback script is really helping us improve our products and documentation.

The license you agreed to when registering for the beta said you needed permission from MiserWare to publish data reported by our software. We would like to lift this requirement to some extent by allowing you to share performance and power numbers reported by MicroMiser. More precisely our lawyers told us to say it like this:

"You are hereby authorized to disclose information regarding the performance of the MicroMiser software, provided that such information is provided to you in a MicroMiser software report."

This includes any information (including energy savings information) provided by MicroMiser in any of its log files and/or information reported in tools such as the mw-feedback script which reports system specific information to MiserWare thereby aiding future development and earning you points in the incentive program.

Several folks have asked about benchmarking against other power management software. With regard to benchmarking, we want to clarify the intent of the license. Our intent was not to preclude benchmarking altogether, but to ensure the measurement methodology is fair to all parties. More precisely, our lawyers told us to paste both permissions together:

"You are hereby authorized to disclose information regarding the performance of the MicroMiser software, (i) provided that such information is provided to you in a MicroMiser software report, or (ii) provided that such information is obtained using techniques approved in writing by MiserWare."

There is no need for you to sign another license agreement as these clarifications simply give you additional permissions under the original license.

These clarifications are the result of your feedback. Please continue to send your comments to feedback@miserware.com . We promise to keep listening.

Regards,

MiserWare

Good thing they have lawyers, huh? Needless to say, I thought about it for a millisecond, and realized I could live without this particular piece of software.

Comment: Re:With friends like these, who needs enemies? (Score 1) 1008

by ketilwaa (#28496857) Attached to: Richard Stallman Says No To Mono
I think you're missing the point. Check up on what free software commentators have been spending their last 3-4 weeks on. Not only are the devs behing F-spot, Beagle, Gnome Do and Tomboy getting side tracked, a big chunk of the FLOSS community are too, getting absorbed in this endless discussion. If you think that topics not directly related to their projects are not eating into the 24 hrs that every day of a distro developer consists of, think again.

Comment: With friends like these, who needs enemies? (Score 2, Insightful) 1008

by ketilwaa (#28496543) Attached to: Richard Stallman Says No To Mono
Interesting, compared to this which has been his comment earlier. Nice to see RMS give the Mono haters more fuel to their flame wars, so that developers can get tangled up in endless discussions about this in stead of actually hacking away. Again, this is one of the reasons GNU/Linux is not gaining more than it does. All MS needs to do in order to keep hackers busy not making great software (and cloning already great C# apps instead), is issue some kind of new vague statement on the nature of .NET. Then, we all lose. Like we've been doing since day 1. Nice. Thanks. With friends like these, who needs enemies?

Comment: Re:When taking a stand... (Score 1) 503

by ketilwaa (#28340473) Attached to: Mono Squeezed Into Debian Default Installation
I sure hope you base your decision on more than that. Otherwise I'd be anti every type of programming language, because of the bugs I've seen in various applications. I personally think F-spot sucks bigtime, so I don't use it. I think other applications like Gnome Do and Tomboy are great. So, your gripe with F-spot is not necessarily due to Mono, but could very well be due to poor use of it.

Comment: Re:Incredible horrifying bloat (Score 1) 503

by ketilwaa (#28337339) Attached to: Mono Squeezed Into Debian Default Installation
I made a slight mistake in my spelling, so I can understand some of the confusion. Gnote calls them "add-ins". My Norwegian translation of Tomboy calls them "Tillegg", which is the same word used to describe Firefox addons/extension. They're not extensions like you're used to in Firefox, but features you can turn off or on, that comes with the app.

Comment: Re:Incredible horrifying bloat (Score 1) 503

by ketilwaa (#28336049) Attached to: Mono Squeezed Into Debian Default Installation
You wrote: "Gnote is a line by line clone of Tomboy from C# to C++. Even the GUI is exactly the same."
It is not. Tomboy offers features that Gnote does not. The fact that an actual clone is worked upon does not mean it's here. You are telling me Gnote is incomplete, which it is. The reasons for lacking features are largely irrelevant to the user.

It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

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