Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission + - Linking URLs in an Email patented .. (groklaw.net)

An anonymous reader writes: Intellectual Ventures Sues Motorola for Patent Infringement Again .. This one is brought by Intellectual Ventures against Motorola in Florida .. Can you guess one company in this picture? Someone helping Microsoft in its anticompetitive attack on Android and Linux, you say? Yes, one of the companies that seems to have transferred two patents to IV for its holy quest is Nokia, Microsoft's 'partner in crime', as I like to think of them.

Submission + - Fear of thinking war machines may push U.S. to exascale (computerworld.com) 1

dcblogs writes: Unlike China and Europe, the U.S. has yet to adopt and fund an exascale development program, and concerns about what that means to U.S. security are growing darker and more dire. If the U.S. falls behind in HPC, the consequences will be "in a word, devastating," Selmer Bringsford, chair of the Department. of Cognitive Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, said at a U.S. House forum this week. "If we were to lose our capacity to build preeminently smart machines, that would be a very dark situation, because machines can serve as weapons." The House is about to get a bill requiring the Dept. of Energy to establish an exascale program. But the expected funding level, about $200 million annually, "is better than nothing, but compared to China and Europe it's at least 10 times too low," said Earl Joseph, an HPC analyst at IDC. David McQueeney, vice president of IBM research, told lawmakers that HPC systems now have the ability to not only deal with large data sets but "to draw insights out of them." The new generation of machines are being programmed to understand what the data sources are telling them, he said.

Submission + - The Government's FISA Requests Shell Game Scam (vortex.com)

Lauren Weinstein writes: In the latest chapter of the federal government's "we don't trust the American people to tie their own shoelaces" saga, we saw two major Internet firms ostensibly release new information yesterday about key national security (e.g. FISA) user data requests that they receive, but in reality the government has forced them to play the old "three card monte" scam on us all.

You know the con? It's a classic version of the notorious "shell game" (only performed in this case with three slightly bent playing cards) where we're tricked into losing bets — through diversion — into believing a card is in one place, when it's actually somewhere else. This ripoff has its roots in antiquity.

Here's how the federal government version works.

Submission + - India to send world's last telegram (yahoo.com) 2

afarhan writes: India will pull the plug on it's 160 year old telegram service on 15th July, this year. This will be the last telegram every sent in the world. However, telegrams are still relevant in this vast country. More than 500 million people are still without access to a phone or Internet. For these people, telegram still remains the only digital communication available. In India, telegram is also considered a legal correspondence.

Submission + - Sexism Still a Problem at E3 (fresnobee.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Now that E3 has wound down and the big product announcements are out of the way, its time to take a step back and look at the culture represented by the giant gaming show. 'The presence of scantily clad women hawking games and gizmos seemed in particular contrast to a report released this week by the Entertainment Software Association, which organizes the gaming industry's annual trade show. It found that 45 percent of the entire gaming population is now women, and women make up 46 percent of the most frequent game buyers.' While there are fewer 'booth babes' than in earlier shows (and while some are trying to bring balance by adding 'booth bros'), the conference are happy to let exhibitors make their own policy. By contrast, the Penny Arcade Expo forbids 'booth babes,' a controversial but widely lauded stance. A recent article in Kotaku notes, 'For every confident cosplayer who might do the job at a con, I am seeing dozens of companies trying to sell me hundreds of women. They are not drawing my attention to the content of their games, or to their tactics or techniques. They are drawing my attention to thigh-high boots, to low-cut shirts, and, frankly, to the hard work of a really expensive bra. So much of what I see here at E3 is aimed directly at the lizard hindbrain of a 13-year-old boy. But you have to be 18 to get into the show, and it's nominally for industry professionals. Perhaps someday we—men and women alike—can all be treated like the grown-ups we theoretically are, and be trusted to judge a game by its content... not its double-D cover.'

Submission + - Software-Defined Data Centers: Seeing Through the Hype (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: In case you didn’t catch it this morning, AllThingsD ran a piece endorsing the idea of the software-defined data center. That’s a venue where hordes of non-technical mid- and upper-level managers will see it and (because of the credibility of AllThingsD) will believe software-defined data centers are not only possible, but that they exist and that your company is somehow falling behind because you personally have not sketched up a topology on a napkin or brought a package of it to install. If mid-level managers in your datacenter or extended IT department have not been pinged at least once today by business-unit managers offering to tip them off to the benefits of software-defined data centers—or demand that they buy one—then someone should go check the internal phone system because not all the calls are coming through. Why was AllThingD’s piece problematic? First, because it’s a good enough publication to explain all the relevant technology terms in ways that even a non-technical audience can understand. Second, it’s also a credible source, owned by Dow Jones & Co. and spun off by The Wall Street Journal. Third, software-defined data centers are genuinely happening—but it’s in the very early stages. The true benefits of the platform won’t arrive for quite some time—and there’s too much to do in the meantime to talk about potential endpoints. Fortunately, there are a number of resources online to help tell hype from reality.

Submission + - Draft NASA funding bill cancels asteroid mission for return to the moon (examiner.com)

MarkWhittington writes: A draft version of the 2013 NASA Authorization Bill nixes any funding for President Obama’s asteroid retrieval mission and instead directs NASA to return astronauts to the lunar surface as soon as possible, funding of course permitted.

The NASA bill is currently working its way through the House Science Committee. Thus far the Senate has not taken up NASA authorization. However the cancellation of the asteroid retrieval mission and an insistence on returning to the moon, which both President Obama and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden have opposed, would place Congress on a collision course with the White House should that version of the bill be passed by both houses of Congress.

Submission + - Removing harrasing photos from social media 1

EtherMonkey writes: Here's the situation. A friend of mine's wife's photo was used without permission on some creep's Facebook page. This 20y/o creep was arrested on suspicion of murdering a 15 year old girl he contacted through Facebook. My friend and his wife feel harassed and threatened by any association with the creep and asked Facebook repeatedly to take down the image from creep's page. Facebook refused. My friend reached out and asked his friends, including myself, to also report the image in the hope that sufficient reports would encourage Facebook to actually get a human being to look into the situation and make a responsible decision, but so far this has been ineffective.

Questions: I there any legal basis for forcing Facebook to remove the image? Is there anyway to contact a living human being at Facebook to have a conversation? Any other suggestions?

Story on the arrest: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/body-found-in-woods-could-be-missing-maine-teen-hundreds-have-been-searching-for-her/2013/05/21/97d11b14-c20c-11e2-9642-a56177f1cdf7_story.html
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/kyle.dube.775/about

Submission + - Future of drone strikes could see execution by algorithm (abc.net.au)

dsanarco writes: The Pentagon is discussing the possibility of replacing human drone operators with computer algorithms, especially for 'signature strikes' where unknown targets are killed simply because they meet certain criteria. So what characteristics define an 'enemy combatant' and where are they outlined in law? Reported by Annabelle Quince from ABC Radio National.

Submission + - Let Them Eat Teslas

theodp writes: If you're a bright kid who wants to prepare for the 21st century workforce (pdf) by studying engineering at Purdue, the government will help your parents pay the $100,000 or so tuition tab with a 7.9% interest loan (plus 4% fees) that's likely to be non-dischargeable in bankruptcy and paid back with after-tax money. If, on the other hand, you want to buy a tricked-out $100,000 Model S, Tesla has teamed up with the government, Wells Fargo, and U.S. Bank on what it calls a 'Revolutionary New Finance Product' that enables those who play the game right to avoid paying sales tax, get the government to pick up the first $15,000 (no down payment needed!), and also receive a 2.95% bankruptcy-dischargeable loan for the balance, the payments for which could be tax-deductible. Yep, 'Revolutionary' may be about right!
Privacy

Submission + - Why Surveillance is Bad (ssrn.com)

An anonymous reader writes: We have a sense that surveillance is bad, but we often have a hard time saying exactly why. In an interesting and readable new article in the Harvard Law Review, law professor Neil Richards argues that surveillance is bad for two reasons — because it menaces our intellectual privacy (our right to read and think freely and secretly) and because it gives the watcher power over the watched, creating the risk of blackmail, persuasion, or discrimination. The article is available for free download at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2239412, and is featured on the Bruce Schneier security blog here: http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2013/03/the_dangers_of.html.
Networking

Submission + - Open DNS Resolvers Center Stage in Massive DDoS Attacks (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: While the big traffic numbers and the spat between Spamhaus and illicit webhost Cyberbunker are grabbing big headlines, the underlying and percolating issue at play here has to do with the open DNS resolvers being used to DDoS the spam-fighters from Switzerland. Open resolvers do not authenticate a packet-sender’s IP address before a DNS reply is sent back. Therefore, an attacker that is able to spoof a victim’s IP address can have a DNS request bombard the victim with a 100-to-1 ratio of traffic coming back to them versus what was requested. DNS amplification attacks such as these have been used lately by hacktivists, extortionists and blacklisted webhosts to great success.

Submission + - Lawsuit could expose whether top VC firms are actually good investments (xconomy.com)

curtwoodward writes: "Venture capitalists like to project the image of wise kingmaker, financial alchemists who have a unique gift for spotting the Next Big Thing. They do not like having anyone see data about their performance, which has been generally lackluster over the past decade. This can be a problem, however, when VCs cash big checks from investors at public pension funds — taking taxpayer money sometimes comes with public disclosure. That's the crux of a court fight happening in California, where the state's massive university system is resisting attempts by the Reuters news organization to decode a complex shell game intended to hide the return data of two giants of Silicon Valley: Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Sequoia Capital."
United States

Submission + - Why Isn't Election Day a National Holiday? (vice.com) 4

pigrabbitbear writes: "Voting is a pain in the ass. First of all, there are lines, unpredictable lines that leave some out in the November cold while they’re waiting to do their civic duty. Then, with all of these new voter ID laws popping up, there’s all kinds of red tape. “Do I need to bring my Social Security card?” you might ask yourself. “How about my passport, a copy of my most recent utility bill, an expired library card? What’s it take to prove you’re American these days?” And inevitably, you’re going to miss some work since Election Day is always a Tuesday. For salaried employees, this is probably just annoying — or a relief depending on how much you like your job. But for hourly employees, this means lost wages. So in a way, you have to pay to vote. No wonder voter turnout is so low."

Slashdot Top Deals

"It takes all sorts of in & out-door schooling to get adapted to my kind of fooling" - R. Frost

Working...