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Submission + - A lecture to engage students into Computer Science

cpcfoursixfour writes: I'm College Professor and I was challenged to give high school students a lecture to get them passionate about Computer Science. Our 3rd year students are organizing a small summer school for high school students. The idea is to motivate them to enroll into Engineering degrees. This summer school consists of several activities and classes on subjects like Electronics, Networking, Computer Science, etc.
Now, if you were given one hour to get high school students passionate about Computer Science, how would you go about it?

Two Senators Call For ACTA Transparency 214

angry tapir writes "Two US senators have asked President Barack Obama's administration to allow the public to review and comment on a controversial international copyright treaty being negotiated largely in secret. The public has a right to know what's being negotiated in the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Senators Sherrod Brown, an Ohio Democrat, and Bernard Sanders, a Vermont Independent, argue in the letter."

Submission + - Apple to challenge Aussie Woolworths over logo (smh.com.au)

jquirke writes: Apple looks to be unhappy with Australian retail & gambling group Woolworths Limited's new logo for it's supermarket division, which Woolworths says is a stylized 'W' and is not an apple, but a piece of 'fresh fruit' that also resembles a person with their arms in the air.

Apple insists the Woolworths logo is too similar to its own, and will be filing a case with IP Australia, the body that governs trademarks in Australia, to have the Woolworths application overturned.

This would not be the first time Apple has flexed its legal muscle in regards to trademark disputes, with defendants ranging from New York City to business schools.

"Love your country but never trust its government." -- from a hand-painted road sign in central Pennsylvania