Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Comment Server Based Storage (Score 1) 219

Disclaimer: I work for a storage vendor. Also a long time Slashdot reader though, so this isn't mean as a sales pitch.

Half of a petabyte is not really a lot of data in today's world. I talk to people every day that are trying to find ways to manages many PBs (into the hundreds) and are having challenges doing this with traditional storage. The trend that was started by the big Internet companies is to get rid of the fibre-channel SANs and instead solve the problem of storage using standard x86 servers. They use Linux as an abstraction layer from the hardware, and applications acting as storage systems too pool many servers together.

One of the challenges you need to get over is stretching a namespace that big without filesystem limitations like maximum inode counts. This is generally accomplished using some type of key/value store (object) under the hood. Single flat namespaces with no practical size barrier.

Some options that are available today are Swift from OpenStack and Ceph from Red Hat if you want to go the open source route. These can be good choices if you have the engineering staff on hand to piece it all together and the talent to keep it running. GPFS is also making a come back in this area, and there are a ton of startups looking at this space now.

My company has a commercial solution for this stuff. Pretty cool - it's a Linux app and runs on the server of your choice. I'l save you the sales pitch, and if you want you can try it for free on your own here:

Whatever you choose, best of luck to you!

Comment Re:This is why they made the cloud (Score -1) 245

You don't buy expensive, power-hungry [hard]ware that's going to cost an arm and a leg to store, power, and cool for the next year when you only need its brute force for a few hours.

But he is planning to do conversions over and over, one after another, handling problems as they occur. As such, one of his goals is that the conversion be as speedy as possible, and he specifically said that he doesn't want to share a CPU with other cloud users. He wants one fast CPU devoted 100% to his project.

Makes sense to me.


Cloud servers with no virtualization and 100% of the CPU? That's what OnMetal is for, motherfuckers!

Comment Re:*Yawn* I'll Wait for the Mint Edition (Score 0) 179

Yes, it's in one monolithic file.

Try making a minor typo in the syntax, then restart networking. You will lose all network connectivity on ALL interfaces.

Fix your typo and try to start networking again. It won't work until you reboot.

Or you can try adding your config to one of the seemingly infinite network config subdirectories (ifup.d, post-ifup.d, etc). Make the same typo anywhere in the subdirectories and you'll still mess up all networking and have to reboot.

I guess this is acceptable if you haven't used any OS besides Windows 98. For the rest of us it's maddening.

Comment Re:Say what you like about Microsoft... (Score -1) 196

Haven't tested the other video outputs, but who the fuck wants to play on composite or component on an HD system?) and I haven't had a chance to find out if it can be fixed, and if so for what cost.

Component video is an HD output. It can do the same 1080p that your HDMI can. It's just that the media hardware cartel doesn't like it because "it's analog and easy to copy." There's no Macrovision on component. It's a pretty nice interface. actually.

Comment Your fault-should have gotten a Palm Pre (Score -1) 864

Choose Android or iPhone-or you could have a Palm Pre with a full Linux-based OS. You can root it with the blessing of the developer, and you still have a monolithic app store for non-power users. Also, cloud-aware contacts management that whips the buttocks of any other address book. But you idiots got all wet for Apple or Google and forgot who the true innovator was!

Comment NxTop - A Client Based Hypervisor (Score 5, Informative) 349

NxTop is pretty cool. It is a hypervisor that installs directly onto the client hardware, allowing you to pull and boot pre-configured images over the network. The hypervisor removes the need for specialized drivers and supports dual monitors. It also has the advantage over VMwareView of allowing the OS to sync for offline use if you would like to leave the office with a laptop. Sure VMware has it as an "experimental" feature now, but it is production with these guys. They came and did a demo for us the other day, pretty cool stuff. I think it was affordable too. You can set policies for who gets what images, remotely disable a lost or stolen laptop, etc. Check this out:

Comment Re:The whole thing is silly (Score -1) 567

Does anyone buy a new Mac and throw a fit when they can't get OS X 10.0 on it? No, that'd be idiotic.

The problem is, the current Mac OS X is far, far better than Mac OS X 10.0. And I would tell you that Vista is inferior, but I can't so much shake the mouse on my 2 year old laptop with 2GB of RAM without Vista going into swap spasms. It's a dog, even on new hardware.

Comment Re:Number of comments not showing on front page (Score -1) 240

Slashdot: It just keeps getting shittier and shittier. Slashdot going all Web 2.0 just exposes what imcompetent programmers they all are, and how lucky CmdrTaco was to get some of that first-wave Internet Bubble money. Content's still great but they should have stopped "improving" the site design in about 2001.

Comment Re:I usually laud hacker hijinks (Score -1) 124

As it tends to enlighten people to the necessity of better computer security... but when it involves things like airport control towers and hospital equipment and files it is totally not cool.

Yeah, it's "totally not cool." Just like drinking the last beer. Or wearing a Nehru jacket. Dude, they crashed a plane into the World Trade Center, I might just have to leave a note on the fridge next time.

And on the seventh day, He exited from append mode.