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Submission + - Report: Jobs considering Liver Transplant

kaufmanmoore writes: Bloomberg is reporting that Apple's Steve Jobs might be considering a liver transplant as a result of complications from his surgery in 2004. The type of tumor that Jobs had commonly spreads from the Pancreas to the Liver. A doctor quoted in the article says that people with Jobs' diagnosis tend to live 20 years past their original cancer diagnosis and respond well to the surgery. In an interview conducted today Jobs is quoted as saying "Why don't you guys leave me alone — why is this important?"

Submission + - UK Secretary wants website ratings, censorship

kaufmanmoore writes: The UK culture secretary calls for a website rating system similar to the one used for movies and downright censorship in an interview with the Telegraph. He also calls for censorship of the internet saying "There is content that should just not be available to be viewed." Other proposals he mentions in his wide-ranging calls for internet regulation are "family-friendly" services from ISPs and requiring sites that host content with a proposal to force takedown notices to be enforced within a specific time interval. Mr. Burnham wants to extend his proposals across the pond and seeks meetings with the Obama administration.
The Internet

Submission + - TW trying cable Caps + overage fees (

redelm writes: Yahoo! reports Time-Warner will try out traffic caps on cable internet service in Beaumont, TX. They will charge an overage fee of $1/GB. Base included transfers will be from 5-40 GB/month. Most interesting was the justification — 5% of users using up to 50% of bandwidth. And that others have secret caps.

Submission + - Adobe takes aim at Google with Acrobat .com (

CWmike writes: "Adobe Acrobat software is getting a Web 2.0 makeover, as the graphics software maker prepares to challenge Microsoft and Google in the online office arena. On Monday, Adobe is launching a public beta of an upcoming hosted collaboration service called Components include a Web-based word processor named Buzzword, which Adobe acquired last fall; the company claims that it produces more-polished-looking documents than other online word processors, such as Google Docs. One take on if it has a fighting chance: Enabling PDFs to become .zip-like file containers is "nice in certain work situations," said Guy Creese, an analyst at Burton Group in Midvale, Utah. "But it sort of begs the question: Is helping people continue to send stuff around by e-mail the best way to do things when you can use wikis or SharePoint and do it better? I'm not convinced this will have a great uptake in the market.""

Submission + - Couple Sues Google for Posting House Pix (

kaufmanmoore writes: A Pennsylvania couple is suing Google, saying a "Street View" picture taken of their house violates their privacy and lowers their property value. Google has offered to remove the image, but the couple's lawyer says that will not undo the damage done. Coincidentally, Allegany County has a similar picture of the same house on a real estate website.

Submission + - Men fall harder than women for Internet fraud ( 1

bednarz writes: "Data compiled from more than 206,000 complaints received last year by the U.S. Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) shows that men lost $1.67 to every $1 lost by women in online fraud. "Historically men were more apt to purchase large ticket items like electronics ... that could explain a lot of it," said John Kane, an IC3 research manager. The difference is also due to the fact that certain types of schemes — like investment fraud — seem to suck men in. The IC3 is the clearinghouse for online crime complaints in the U.S., and its database is used by regulators and law enforcement to get a picture of criminal trends. It's a joint effort run by the FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center."

Submission + - NJ Law Bans Some Sex Offenders from Internet Use

kaufmanmoore writes: A new law signed into law Thursday bans sex offenders who used to internet to lure their victims and those under lifetime supervision bans them from using the internet for non work related use. The offenders would be required to discuss their computer access to their parole officers and violations could result in fines and jail time. New Jersey joins Florida and Nevada as the only states to restrict internet use among convicted sex offenders. More details available here.

Submission + - Domains May Disappear After Search 1

Ponca City, We Love You writes: "A perfect domain name pops into your mind, a quick check at your registrar reveals that the domain is available, you put off the registration a few minutes and when you come back to register the domain, it's taken by someone else. How much time has elapsed between the search and the attempted registration — in one case, less than 90 seconds. Daily Domainer has an interesting story alleging that there may be a leak that allows domain tasters to intercept, analyze and register your domain ideas in minutes. "Every time you do a whois search with any service, you run a risk of losing your domain," says one industry insider. ICANN's Security and Stability Advisory Committee (SSAC ) has not been able to find hard evidence of Domain Name Front Running but they have issued an advisory (pdf) for people to come forward with hard evidence it is happening. Here is how domain name research theft crimes can occur and some tips to avoiding being a victim."

Submission + - Broadcasters launch ads opposing wireless internet

kaufmanmoore writes: According to an AP report, The National Association of Broadcasters is launching ads to target lawmakers over a push by a consortium of technology giants including Google, Intel, HP and MSFT who want to use unused and unlicensed TV spectrum for wireless broadband. Broadcasters are airing concerns about the devices creating interference with broadcast television and in a statement NAB chairman Alan Frank takes a swipe at technology companies saying, "While our friends at Intel, Google and Microsoft may find system errors, computer glitches and dropped calls tolerable, broadcasters do not."

Submission + - GPL Violations On Windows Go Unnoticed?

Scott_F writes: I recently reviewed several commercial, closed-source slideshow authoring packages for Windows and came across an alarming trend. Several of the packages I installed included GPL and LGPL software without any mention of the GPL, much less source code. For example, DVD Photo Slideshow ( included mkisofs, cdrdao, dvdauthor, spumux, id3lib, lame, mpeg2enc and mplex (all of which are GPL or LGPL). What's worse is that the company tried to hide this by wrapping them all in DLL's! There are other violations in other packages as well. It seems that use of GPL software in commercial Windows applications is on the rise based on my testing of other software. My question is how much are GPL violations in the Windows world being pursued? Does the FSF or EFF follow-up on these if the platform is not GPL? How aware is the community of this trend?

Submission + - "Viacom hit me for infringing my own copyright ( 2

Chris Knight writes: "Long story short: I ran for school board where I live this past fall and created some TV commercials including this one with a "Star Wars" theme. A few months ago VH1 grabbed the commercial from YouTube and featured it in a segment of its show "Web Junk 2.0". Neither VH1 or its parent company Viacom told me they were doing this or asked my permission to use it, but I didn't mind it if they did. It was great to see the commercial was being enjoyed by a far wider audience than I'd expected. I was honored that they chose to use it and thought that Aries Spears's commentary about it was pretty hilarious, so I posted a clip of VH1's segment on YouTube so that I could put it on my blog. This morning I got an e-mail from YouTube saying that the video has been pulled because Viacom is claiming that I'm violating its copyright. Viacom used my video without permission on their commercial television show, and now says that I am infringing on THEIR copyright for showing the clip of the work that Viacom made in violation of my own copyright! Talk about chutzpah! Needless to say, I would like to fight this: not for any kind of monetary compensation, but just for the right to employ my own self-created material per Fair Use."

Submission + - Microsoft Kills AutoPatcher

Sounder40 writes: Sad news indeed from the AutoPatcher crew:

"Today we received an e-mail from Microsoft, requesting the immediate take-down of the download page, which of course means that AutoPatcher is probably history. As much as we disagree, we can do very little, and although the download page is merely a collection of mirrors, we took the download page down.

We would like to thank you for your support. For the past 4 years, it has been a blast. Unfortunately, it seems like it's the end of AutoPatcher as we know it.
United States

Submission + - Rootkit installation hits PC gaming (

An anonymous reader writes: Sony (the owners of SecureROM copy protection) are still up to their old tricks. One would think that they would have learned their lesson after the music CD DRM fiasco. However, they have now gone over and started infesting PC gaming with their DRM ideas. Recent facts have surfaced that show that BioShock, a recently released PC game, installs a rootkit as part of its SecureROM copy protection scheme. Not only this, just installing the DEMO installs the rootkit on your system, which embeds itself into Explorer. This begs the question: Since when did demos need copy protection?

Do not underestimate the value of print statements for debugging.