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Comment: Re:Trendy no more? (Score 1) 65

by kauaidiver (#45786051) Attached to: Ruby 2.1.0 Released

I don't know enough about Ruby to say anything positive or negative about it. I was just commenting on Python because that's what I know - it's just funny to hear people moan and whine about similar things, which I've heard re. Python. And the quote "Ruby adds nothing to the existing languages" is harsh, C certainly got slapped around in its early days. Who needs to get slapped around more now and kicked off the bus (or at least charged for taking up two seats) is Java.

Comment: Re:Trendy no more? (Score 1) 65

by kauaidiver (#45785527) Attached to: Ruby 2.1.0 Released

You are more likely to "shoot yourself in the foot" so to speak and code can get unmanageable.

In short given too much flexibility you can make the language so different than the norm. 10 people with 10 different styles writing Ruby code on a 2+ year project...come back after a 6 month break take a look and you got a big mess on your hands :) Style guides help there but still.

Bottom line and not just ruby avoid getting "cute" with the language. I got berated by a college prof. because I thought it was a good idea in C++ to overload the ++, -- operators on a stack class to do push and pop! He asked sarcastically why stop with just ++ and --?

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