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Comment: To Ask This Question Is To Answer It (Score 1) 1123

by kannen (#25949469) Attached to: IT Job Without a Degree?

The answer, which may be hard for you to hear, is that *you* will not be getting a "good IT job" as a sysadmin any time in the near future.

To be a sysadmin, or to qualify for some other "good IT job", you need experience, knowledge, and the proven capacity to learn and adapt. No company (besides a tiny mom-and-pop joint) will be entrusting their systems to a person who has read a lot on websites, but has not accomplished anything. A degree is an accomplishment of sorts, because it means that you are willing to use your resources (time and money) toward your chosen industry. Of course, a degree without a related internship or other work experience is still very sketchy.

If you want a sysadmin job without a degree, then you will have to work your way up through other less glamorous IT positions - like a help desk. This is a completely acceptable route because you will learn a lot in these positions, gaining that much needed experience and knowledge and showing whether or not you can learn and adapt (as a job in the tech field always demands).

Lower your expectations and look for a job in the IT industry that is commensurate with your level of experience and then work hard at it. As time goes by and you gain experience, you can look for other IT jobs that fit your higher level of experience.

You do not want a job that pays a lot for a level of experience that you do not have. You will find yourself overwhelmed by the responsibilities, unhappy in the position, without respect from your fellow co-workers, and wishing you'd taken the longer route.

Media

+ - How The Tech Boom Killed Business 2.0->

Submitted by Heinz
Heinz (666) writes "Is the technology industry eating the publications that cover it alive? Barring a last moment reprieve, Business 2.0 magazine's September issue could be its last, a source familiar with the matter said in response to a report in the Tuesday edition of The New York Times.... But while Business 2.0's backer's got it right when they bet on a tech resurgence, they apparently didn't count on the traditional advertising business becoming one of the new boom's first victims."
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Book review - Stealing Your Life

Submitted by
Ben Rothke
Ben Rothke writes "Untitled document It's a fallacy that our elected officials take forever to get things done. Two examples where Washington acted with speed are with the National Do Not Call Registry and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

The National Do Not Call Registry was slated to take effect on October 1, 2003, but various marketing associations challenged its legitimacy and even if the FTC had the jurisdiction to enforce it. Notwithstanding, President Bush speedily signed the bill authorizing the no-call list to go into effect in September 2003 and the United State Court of Appeals upheld the constitutionality of the registry in February 2004.

On June 25, 2002, WorldCom revealed it had overstated its earnings by more than $7 billion by improperly accounting for its operating costs. Senator Paul Sarbanes then introduced Senate Bill 2673 that same day where it passed 97-0 less than three weeks later. The House and Senate formed a Conference Committee to reconcile the differences between Sarbanes's bill and Representative Michael Oxley's bill (HR 3763) and on July 24, 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was passed.

The bottom line is that when politicians really want votes and PR, they can act swiftly. The frustration is exacerbated when politicians choose to do nothing when it comes to identity theft. In Stealing Your Life: The Ultimate Identity Theft Prevention Plan, Frank Abagnale details the frustration that consumers face (and will face in the years to come) when their identities are stolen, the ease at which the criminals carry out such crimes, and the months and often years of effort required to regain ones identity.

Abagnale's tenure on the criminal side long ago gives him the advantage that he knows firsthand how criminals think and such an outlook is pervasive throughout the book. Looking at the current state of identity protection, he states that he is personally horrified at how easy identity theft is. In fact, he calls it "a crook's dream come true". The book details incident after incident where criminals and criminal gangs obtained credit in someone else's name with ease.

What makes this worse is that the book shows how we haven't even scratched the surface of the identity theft problem. Everyone, including the FTC agrees that current identity theft figures are quite low, due to the fact that so many cases go unreported or undetected.

The book notes that lenders often miscategorize a good deal of identity theft because it looks like delinquent bills, as opposed to a crime. Only later does the victim realize what has been going on and complains, at which time it becomes apparent that fraud was involved. But by that time, the money has been written off as a credit loss and then appears as negative information on the victim's credit report.

Like many other books on the subject of identity theft, Stealing Your Life: The Ultimate Identity Theft Prevention Plan covers the main issues, and makes numerous suggestions on how to control your identity. What is interesting about the book is that Abagnale also focuses on why identity theft is so popular for today's criminals. One of the main reasons it that the person committing the crime has the odds significantly stacked in their favor. The book quotes a Gartner study that found that identity thieves have roughly a 1 in 700 chance of getting caught by law enforcement, which is a figure any criminal would jump at.

The books 13 chapters are written in an easy to read and compelling style. The early chapters detail the prime causes of what makes identity theft such a problem and astutely notes that a large part of the problem is that financial services companies are conducting business today by doling out credit like candy and do almost nothing to ascertain that people really are who they say they are when applying for credit. In addition, issuers of credit in their haste to rack up more business frequently accept a social security number from an applicant at face value, without demanding proof. The book lists many examples of where children and dead people have been given credit.

In chapter 6, the book lists 20 steps one can take in the hope of preventing identify theft. The author notes that since the punishment for identity theft, and the recovery of stolen goods from identity theft are so low, the only viable source of action is prevention by the individual. All 20 steps are fundamental, from protecting your social security number and examining your financial statements, to using a shredder and more.

Chapter 8 lists one of the more important points of the book, in which Abagnale writes that all credit and personal information should be opt-in based, as opposed to the prevalent opt-out requirement. Such an approach is what one would hope Congress would mandate, but does not have the tenacity to do. The problem is that if a consumer does not opt-out, they are giving the financial institution permission to share their personal information with the hundreds and often thousands of affiliates they share data with.

Companies obviously prefer opt-out, which shifts the burden to the consumer to take action to keep their information from being shared. With opt-in, the burden shifts and the financial services company has to prove that consumers granted their consent to have their personal information shared. National opt-in requirements would significant stem the flow of personal information, which is in part why identity theft is so easy to carry out.

Aside from a glaring error in chapter 12 where Abagnale erroneously writes that true authentication is impossible on the Internet and occasionally hawking companies he has financial dealings with, Stealing Your Life: The Ultimate Identity Theft Prevention Plan is an interesting and entertaining book on a subject of the fasting growing crime in the USA.

The book details what happens when an apathetic Congress and financial services industry do almost nothing to protect their constituents, and the thieves who have never had it easier. These identity thieves are able to acquire gigabytes of personal information without ever having to leave their workstations. When you factor in that the odds are in their favor of never being prosecuted, it leaves nearly every individual at risk for identity theft.

With Congress dropping the ball and doing nothing, Abagnale shows that it is up to each individual to take responsibility for protecting their own personal information. Stealing Your Life: The Ultimate Identity Theft Prevention Plan is indeed a great place to start such an approach.


Ben Rothke is a security consultant with BT INS and the author of Computer Security: 20 Things Every Employee Should Know"
Software

+ - Interview with Linus Torvalds

Submitted by sucker_muts
sucker_muts (776572) writes "It seems to have been a while, but there's an new interesting interview with Linus Torvalds. Covering important topics like what he thinks about gpl v3, Microsoft in general and the niches of linux. He considers the desktop to be the best place for developement since it has varied and complex usages, compared to servers and embedded devices.
But is Linus still doing it 'just for fun'? His words: "Yes. Its still why I do it. The parts I do that end up beign fun have been different over the years — it used to be purely about the coding, these days I dont write all that much code myself, and now its mostly about the organizational side: merging code, communicating with people, pointing people in the right direction, and then the occasional bugfixing myself.""

How many NASA managers does it take to screw in a lightbulb? "That's a known problem... don't worry about it."

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