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Comment: Re:It's already going on... (Score 1) 347

by drakaan (#47415665) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

I tend to agree with you. I'm not ignorant about my driving. That's the *reason* that I'm a conservative driver.

I've been a driver for 24 years. In that time, vehicles I own have been involved in 5 collisions. In two of those, the vehicles were parked and struck by other motorists. In one, the vehicle was stationary, but not parked, and struck by another motorist, in one, I backed into a car that was going around 25 mph through a gas station parking lot (lesson learned), and in one, I clipped some poor guy's '63 skylark with a humvee when doing a courier run at the very end of a 24-hour CQ shift (I still feel like a jackass about that one...I'd swear I looked right and things were clear, but I was obviously wrong).

Aside from that, I've had one claim arising from a hailstorm that beat the crap out of the family minivan.

I was not giving some list of things I do that make me perfect, because I'm not perfect. What I am is cautious, mainly because I'm not made of money, and deductibles are not my friend. I don't drive strictly the speed limit, but I always follow at a safe distance for the road conditions, and I pay attention to folks behind me who don't do the same. I let faster drivers pass me and move over to make that easier when possible. I signal lane changes and turns. I change lanes before the last minute so that I don't have to worry about cutting someone off.

I do all of those things for a couple of reasons. First, I don't want to be the cause of an accident and cause damage to myself, someone else, my car, or someone else's car because it sucks for everyone when that happens. Second, I don't want to pay any more money than I have to for the privilege of driving.

Comment: Very clever (Score 4, Interesting) 68

Reminds me a little of some work done by Terje Mathisen, an expert assembly language programmer. Not exactly that same as the exploit, but probably interesting to a few slashdotters. I'll let him describe it:

"The most complicated code I have ever written is/was a piece of executable text, in order to be able to send binary data over very early text-only email systems:

"Minimum possible amount of self-modification (a single two-byte backwards branch), a first-level bootstrap that fits in two 64-byte lines including a Copyright notice and which survives the most common forms of reformatting, including replacing the CRLF line terminator by any zero, one or two byte sequence. This piece of code picks up the next few lines, combining pairs of characters into arbitrary byte values before flushing the prefetch cache by branching into the newly decoded second-level bootstrap. (Everything uses only the ~70 different ascii codes which are blessed by the MIME standard as never requiring encoding or escape sequences.)

"This second level consists of a _very_ compact BASE64 decode which takes the remainder of the input and re-generates the original binary which it can either execute in place or write to disk.

Comment: Re:It's already going on... (Score 4, Interesting) 347

by drakaan (#47408899) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

Actually, as someone who is a pretty conservative driver, I welcomed the option to let worse drivers subsidize my premiums in exchange for them tracking my driving for a while. I could care less that they know (for example) that I always signal turns and lane changes and don't aggressively accelerate or stop. I could also care less that people who can't demonstrate the same behavior are seen as a higher risk and charged a higher premium.

...except you, of course, since you're on my \. frinds list and all...

Comment: Criteria (Score 1) 276

by JavaLord (#47408287) Attached to: The World's Best Living Programmers
The submission sort of gets at this, but what should be some criteria for judging "the best" programmers?

Having discovered an algorithm? (Bonus points if it's named after you).
Created a programming language?
Written a book (on programming)?
Created a program that was somehow valuable or meaningful?
Educated other programmers?
Science

When Beliefs and Facts Collide 688

Posted by samzenpus
from the what-do-you-think dept.
schnell writes A New York Times article discusses a recent Yale study that shows that contrary to popular belief, increased scientific literacy does not correspond to increased belief in accepted scientific findings when it contradicts their religious or political views. The article notes that this is true across the political/religious spectrum and "factual and scientific evidence is often ineffective at reducing misperceptions and can even backfire on issues like weapons of mass destruction, health care reform and vaccines." So what is to be done? The article suggests that "we need to try to break the association between identity and factual beliefs on high-profile issues – for instance, by making clear that you can believe in human-induced climate change and still be a conservative Republican."

+ - CalTech astronomers predict that 1 in 10,000 stars is composed entirely of metal

Submitted by porkchop_d_clown
porkchop_d_clown (39923) writes "A recently discovered aerodynamic phenomena of turbulence, called 'preferential concentration' causes heavier materials to be sorted out of more turbulent areas, increasing their concentration in eddies.

Now astronomers are theorizing that this effect could lead to the formation of stars with no hydrogen or helium in them.

See also: Some Stars are Totally Metal: A New Mechanism Driving Dust Across Star-Forming Clouds, and Consequences for Planets, Stars, and Galaxies."
Government

California Property Tax Exemptions For Solar Energy Systems Extended To 2025 76

Posted by timothy
from the special-favors-if-you-can-get-'em dept.
New submitter DaveSmith1982 writes with word from PV Tech that A property tax exemption for solar power systems in California has been extended to 2025, following the passing of a bill as part of the annual state budget. Senate Bill 871 (SB871) was approved during the signing of the budget by governor Jerry Brown, which took place last week. The wording of SB871 extends the period during which property taxes will not be applied to "active solar energy systems," which includes PV and solar water heaters.

Comment: Re:So what you're saying... (Score 1) 66

by pudge (#47338077) Attached to: Why capitalism works

Not my "meme." I rarely, if ever, refer to it.

But, it's true. Capitalism relies on private control and a free, competitive market. Crony capitalism is government control and a resulting non-free market by explicitly decreasing competition.

I mean, sure, you can call it whatever you want to, but when I say "capitalism works" and someone says "crony capitalism is proof it doesn't," that's just stupid, because crony capitalism flatly violates some of the primary tenets of capitalism.

Comment: Re:So what you're saying... (Score 1) 66

by pudge (#47338059) Attached to: Why capitalism works

It was a different fork of this thread.

So you admit you lied.

Crony capitalism ... can also happen when a purchased politician prevents regulations from occurring, to improve profitability.

False, but telling that you think such a stupid thing. To you, there's no difference between freedom, and not-freedom. It's just two different options, neither better than the other.

It is also noted that you have still failed to produce an example of a federal regulation that actually impedes profitability of health insurance companies.

a. I never saw you ask that. It might've been in the comment I replied to, and I didn't see it, because after your massive whopper about what you want people to think crony capitalism is, I stopped reading.

b. Why would I produce an example of something I never asserted? Once again: holy shit, you're retarded.

Comment: Re:Big "if" (Score 1) 66

by pudge (#47338035) Attached to: Why capitalism works

For example, does state law say you cannot participate in GOP runoff if you participated in Dem primary?

I think that's the case McDaniel is making, and I haven't heard it refuted.

I haven't seen the case strongly made. If you have a link, I'd be obliged. Stories I saw all handwaved at it.

You don't seem to understand that in modern America, "having rules and enforcing them" == "voter suppression".

But they are Republicans. Voter suppression is expected. It's OK.

Check the mirror and see if you don't notice a big ol' raaaaacist in there, or something. :-)

Only because I see YOU STANDING BEHIND ME. What the fuck, man?!?

Comment: Whatever (Score 2) 358

I was an Emacs dude for a long time and still use it. Then I tried RubyMine, and eventually upgraded to IDEA. The IDE features are sometimes handy. I also use vi very regularly for quick edits of small scripts.

I would no more stick to one editor than I would stick to one programming language. Right tool for the job is the key.

To write good code is a worthy challenge, and a source of civilized delight. -- stolen and paraphrased from William Safire

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