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Comment: Re:What idealistic state? (Score 1) 470 470

The main problems are with weird 'features' MS added (outside of the specification), probably as intentional feature bloat to thwart other office suites importing the files. OO/LO is perfect, I believe, with Word 2000 and older .docs, while slightly lacking in some of those newer 'features.'

Word 2004, though, as I have discovered, has a horribly broken implementation of the .doc format. Any OO/LO-saved .doc will lose all of its formatting in 2004. I call this a Word 2004 bug (and it may have been fixed—my teacher may have an old version; I don't know), because it works fine with 2003, 2007, and 2008, and I know OO/LO follows the standard.

Comment: Re:Shocking news: (Score 1) 387 387

Depending on your hub and controllers, it may be an underpowering issue. If your hub isn't externally powered you might want to consider getting one that is (one with a power adapter). If you have multiple ports directly on your computer, you can test this theory by plugging a few controllers in directly and seeing if they work.

Comment: Re:Not new; irony. (Score 1) 135 135

It is obviously not just an interface to the paper form. The paper form allows you 150 words. Not 1,000 characters or something similar. If you write in tiny tiny letters, you're still only allowed to use 150 words, even if you could fit 500 in the space allotted.

It is just an interface to the paper form. It's not a very good interface to the paper form. We already know it is buggy :P. And the word counts obviously apply either way; they are nothing to do with paper or online forms.

Comment: Not new; irony. (Score 4, Informative) 135 135

This problem has existed at least since last year (I applied last year) and presumably ever since the invention of the online Common Application. I find it amazingly hilarious and ironic that the problem is only getting publicity in the year in which the Common Application added warnings about the problem to the website. The obvious solution is to use a monospaced font and allow exactly the correct characters on the online form. (Note: some sections of the application already are in monospaced fonts. This should be easy.)

It is not explained why an electronic submission must have such strictly enforced limits.

It is because the form is actually just an online interface to a paper form. The warning tells you to look at the preview of the printed application to check for problems.

Comment: Re:Is that picture supposed to be erotic? (Score 1) 113 113

FTFA (don't kill me—I read the article because the picture had no nose or mouth and weird eyes, which had to have a reason):

A male torso from Tactile Mind; the Braille message is informational more than lyrical — he wears a mask, he has a muscular bare chest ...

So, it's not supposed to look or feel like a face.

But it's creepy.

Comment: Re:Four megawatts of power for up to eight hours? (Score 1) 301 301

It is badly worded, but I am pretty sure it means that it can hold 32 MWh (megawatt-hours). That is a unit of energy, whereas watts are a unit of power (energy per unit time).

In SI, if unconventional, units, the battery holds 115.2 gigajoules.

Data Storage

SSD Price Drops Signaling End of Spinning Media? 646 646

gjt writes "When Intel and OCZ recently announced new 'affordable' Solid State Disk drives — offering a meager 32-40GB — we initially yawned. But, then we took a closer look at the press releases and the in-progress research and development in SSD technology and opened our eyes. While the new drives aren't affordable on a cost per gigabyte basis for everyone, it does set a precedent — and most importantly a barometer price of $100. And it really does start the death clock for hard drive technology."
Government

+ - Senate Votes to Replace Aviation Radar With GPS-> 1 1

plover writes: The U.S. Senate today passed by a 93-0 margin a bill that would implement the FAA's NextGen plan to replace aviation radar with GPS units. It will help pay for the upgrade by increasing aviation fuel taxes on private aircraft. It will require two inspections per year on foreign repair stations that work on U.S. planes. And it will ban pilots from using personal electronics in the cockpit. This just needs to be reconciled with the House version and is expected to soon become law. This was discussed on Slashdot a few years ago.
Link to Original Source

+ - Does ITunes give your information away?

An anonymous reader writes: I recently noticed that iTunes changed to its online contract yet again, but this time it put its privacy policy on the Apple site (and not in the contract you see in the iTunes program, as they have done previously). Long story short, this new policy no longer states you won't be personally identifiable. It now states that "At times we may be required by law or litigation to disclose your personal information. We may also disclose information about you if we determine that for national security, law enforcement, or other issues of public importance, disclosure is necessary." So does this mean they reserve the right to rat you out for one of the government's various data-mining projects?
Data Storage

+ - The Hard Drive Death Watch Begins Now->

gjt writes: When Intel and OCZ recently announced new "affordable" Solid State Disk drives — offering a meager 32-40GB — we initially yawned. But, then we took a closer look at the press releases and the in-progress research and development in SSD technology and opened our eyes. While the new drives aren't affordable on a cost per gigabyte basis for everyone, it does set a precedent — and most importantly a barometer price of $100. And it really does start the death clock for hard drive technology.
Link to Original Source

If a 6600 used paper tape instead of core memory, it would use up tape at about 30 miles/second. -- Grishman, Assembly Language Programming

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