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Comment 75 too old? (Score 1) 478

I met a man who was 91 a few weeks ago. He gave his 66 GMC C1000 to me. Very nice, entertaining, funny guy. He was a little out there and was not very physically capable, but he seemed to have a lot to say and was articulate and humorous.

I think that the scale in which we age and how drastic it is directly relates to how we choose to live and treat our bodies.

I plan to keep taking care of myself and to see how it goes...if I hit 75 and want to end it then that's easy. Not really something I can speculate on now...and don't really think this guy is in his right mind to speculate either.

Comment Commodity crapware (Score 1) 287

I'm currently running 2 old desktops stuffed full of HDDs and a new i3 machine.
1) Pentium 4, 4g ddr POS, 6x2tb storage and a tiny OS disc.
2) Older core i7, 8g ddr2, 6x2tb storage and tiny OS disc.
3) i3 machine, 32g ddr3, 16g ssd for OS, 500g for VMs.

Usable space is about 7tb. Server #2 mirrors with server #1, the machines each run raid 5 with a hot spare... overkill but I've lost data enough times to be completely done with that mumbo jumbo. I'll soon be adding storage to #3 and moving #1 off site and mirroring remotely. I run a mix of debian/fedora/other. Between server #2 and #3 I have 6 VMs.

Comment Privacy! rabble! (Score 1) 790

I agree that the act of scanning email is pretty big brother-y...but a lot of people have activated Google Now which is MEANT to scan your email and other communications and data for information gathering.

If this perv piece of trash had Google Now turned on then what do you expect?--or any of you fine folks have it active? That no human will ever come across data that is freely accessed by their software?

Just saying.

Comment Re:Which 90% ? (Score 1) 224

This is database architecture and IS used.

It works like this: You tier where your data is stored based on how often it is read.

Depending on your database load, you could use a tier similar to..
1+ reads per second
1+ reads per day
1+ reads per month
1+ reads per 6 months
1+ reads per year (this is your archive/old data level)

Based on your needs, you make data more available; data that isn't used is eventually shelved further back. Eventually unused data migrates toward 'old data' and takes increasingly more time/energy to read, but is still available when needed. Whereas your frequently accessed data is available immediately.

Comment Re:Which 90% ? (Score 1) 224

This is database architecture and IS used. It works like this: You tier where your data is stored based on how often it is read. Depending on your database load, you could use a tier similar to.. 1+ reads per second 1+ reads per day 1+ reads per month 1+ reads per 6 months 1+ reads per year (this is your archive/old data level) ..Based on your needs, you make data more available; data that isn't used is eventually shelved further back. Eventually unused data migrates toward 'old data' and takes increasingly more time/energy to read, but is still available when needed. Whereas your frequently accessed data is available immediately.

Comment Re:Hmm.... (Score 3, Insightful) 833

I happen to indulge in world of warcraft from time to time, and let me tell you this...

I've posted on the forums a total of maybe 3 times...ever.

If you don't want to show your real name, then just don't use the forums. You can get support in-game or over the phone.

And parents that want to protect their children: Disable realid (forum) access in the parental controls panel.
Canada

Cheap Cancer Drug Finally Tested In Humans 363

John Bayko writes "Mentioned on Slashdot a couple of years ago, the drug dichloroacetate (DCA) has finally finished its first clinical trial against brain tumors in humans. Drug companies weren't willing to test a drug they could not patent, so money was raised in the community through donations, auctions, and finally government support, but the study was still limited to five patients. It showed extremely positive results in four of them. This episode raises the question of what happens to all the money donated to Canadian and other cancer societies, and especially the billions spent buying merchandise with little pink ribbons on it, if not to actual cancer research like this."

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