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Comment: Privacy! rabble! (Score 1) 790

I agree that the act of scanning email is pretty big brother-y...but a lot of people have activated Google Now which is MEANT to scan your email and other communications and data for information gathering.

If this perv piece of trash had Google Now turned on then what do you expect?--or any of you fine folks have it active? That no human will ever come across data that is freely accessed by their software?

Just saying.

Comment: Re:Which 90% ? (Score 1) 224

by kage.j (#32861656) Attached to: Dell Says 90% of Recorded Business Data Is Never Read

This is database architecture and IS used.

It works like this: You tier where your data is stored based on how often it is read.

Depending on your database load, you could use a tier similar to..
1+ reads per second
1+ reads per day
1+ reads per month
1+ reads per 6 months
1+ reads per year (this is your archive/old data level)

Based on your needs, you make data more available; data that isn't used is eventually shelved further back. Eventually unused data migrates toward 'old data' and takes increasingly more time/energy to read, but is still available when needed. Whereas your frequently accessed data is available immediately.

Comment: Re:Which 90% ? (Score 1) 224

by kage.j (#32861616) Attached to: Dell Says 90% of Recorded Business Data Is Never Read
This is database architecture and IS used. It works like this: You tier where your data is stored based on how often it is read. Depending on your database load, you could use a tier similar to.. 1+ reads per second 1+ reads per day 1+ reads per month 1+ reads per 6 months 1+ reads per year (this is your archive/old data level) ..Based on your needs, you make data more available; data that isn't used is eventually shelved further back. Eventually unused data migrates toward 'old data' and takes increasingly more time/energy to read, but is still available when needed. Whereas your frequently accessed data is available immediately.

Comment: Re:Hmm.... (Score 3, Insightful) 833

by kage.j (#32816478) Attached to: Blizzard To Require Real First and Last Names For Official Forums
I happen to indulge in world of warcraft from time to time, and let me tell you this...

I've posted on the forums a total of maybe 3 times...ever.

If you don't want to show your real name, then just don't use the forums. You can get support in-game or over the phone.

And parents that want to protect their children: Disable realid (forum) access in the parental controls panel.
Canada

Cheap Cancer Drug Finally Tested In Humans 363

Posted by timothy
from the good-enough-for-the-likes-of-you dept.
John Bayko writes "Mentioned on Slashdot a couple of years ago, the drug dichloroacetate (DCA) has finally finished its first clinical trial against brain tumors in humans. Drug companies weren't willing to test a drug they could not patent, so money was raised in the community through donations, auctions, and finally government support, but the study was still limited to five patients. It showed extremely positive results in four of them. This episode raises the question of what happens to all the money donated to Canadian and other cancer societies, and especially the billions spent buying merchandise with little pink ribbons on it, if not to actual cancer research like this."

Comment: Re:Yeah, so why are they better? (Score 2, Interesting) 423

by kage.j (#28568211) Attached to: Enthusiasts Convene To Say No To SQL, Hash Out New DB Breed
Linq to SQL/Entities(on your entity provider) has it's benefits and downfalls.

But damn, Linq to everything else fucking rocks faces, and anyone who says otherwise seriously needs to buy a linq book and actually use the shit. Linq to XML/collections .. I don't know where I'd be without it. And I don't want to know!

Yeah, linq is handy with Entities, but you run into a whole messuh problems if you don't be careful with it. (And people who don't understand relational databases should stay away from it.)

At least, that is my opinion...but don't take it too seriously
Image

Science Unlocks The Mystery Of Belly Button Lint 161

Posted by samzenpus
from the extreme-navel-gazing dept.
After three years of research, including examining 503 pieces of fluff from his own belly button, Georg Steinhauser has discovered a type of body hair that traps stray pieces of lint and draws them into the navel. Dr Steinhauser's observations showed that "small pieces of fluff first form in the hair and then end up in the navel at the end of the day." Chemical analysis revealed the pieces of fluff were not just made up of cotton from clothing. Wrapped up in the lint were also flecks of dead skin, fat, sweat and dust. Unfortunately, further study has failed to yield a hair or fiber that would give Dr. Steinhauser the last three years of his life back.
Operating Systems

+ - 64 bit Menuet 0.59 available

Submitted by Michael135
Michael135 (1068062) writes "Menuet is a fully assembly written OS for x86. Menuet 0.59 beta includes pre-emptive multitasking, multithreading, ring-3 protection, responsive GUI with resolutions up to 1280x1024, Editor/Assembler for applications, TCP/IP stack with Loopback & Ethernet drivers, simple http/ftp clients, free-form application windows and real-time data fetch. Menuet64 is released as freeware and Menuet32 under GPL."

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