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+ - Kim Jong Un, Ghost of Hitler, Announce Approval of Slashdot Beta

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Supreme Leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the ghost of the former leader of National Socialist German Workers' Party have approved of the new Slashdot Beta site in a rare instance of agreement amongst the two. The two strong personalities have a history strong disagreement of the most mundane of things but united today outside the Great Pyongyang Unicorn Lair with Slashdot Editor Samzenpus to show support. "Morale at Dice [Slashdot's parent company] is at an all time low, but the show of support from such great world leaders is an encouragement to the entire team", said Samzenpus."

+ - CowboyNeal Locked In Basement For Opposing Slashdot Beta-> 23

Submitted by Robotron23
Robotron23 (832528) writes "Slashdot's finest editor to date has been mercilessly locked in a basement filled with fuzzy dice Dice created to furnish Google's self-driving cars. Screaming, followed by sounds of frenzied masturbation, have been reported from the subterranean dungeon. "There's no way enough ejaculatory fluid is getting sprayed on our dice to make us care about this deluded protestor's opinion." a Dice executive commented earlier. Former Slashdot owner turned professional millionaire Robert Malda, expressed support: "No porn. More dice than a casino. Lame.""
Link to Original Source

Comment: The Sub-Seabed Solution (Score 1) 340

by kEnder242 (#42213347) Attached to: How Yucca Mountain Was Killed

Burial of Radioactive Waste under the Seabed; January 1998; Scientific American Magazine; by Hollister, Nadis; 6 Page(s)

On the floor of the deep oceans, poised in the middle of the larger tectonic plates, lie vast mudflats that might appear, at first glance, to constitute some of the least valuable real estate on the planet. The rocky crust underlying these "abyssal plains" is blanketed by a sedimentary layer, hundreds of meters thick, composed of clays that resemble dark chocolate and have the consistency of peanut butter. Bereft of plant life and sparsely populated with fauna, these regions are relatively unproductive from a biological standpoint and largely devoid of mineral wealth.

Yet they may prove to be of tremendous worth, offering a solution to two problems that have bedeviled humankind since the dawn of the nuclear age: these neglected suboceanic formations might provide a permanent resting place for high-level radioactive wastes and a burial ground for the radioactive materials removed from nuclear bombs. Although the disposal of radioactive wastes and the sequestering of material from nuclear weapons pose different challenges and exigencies, the two tasks could have a common solution: burial below the seabed.

Also:
http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/96oct/seabed/seabed.htm

Comment: The Sub-Seabed Solution (Score 0) 347

by kEnder242 (#40939753) Attached to: US Freezes Nuclear Power Plant Permits Because of Waste Issues

Burial of Radioactive Waste under the Seabed; January 1998; Scientific American Magazine; by Hollister, Nadis; 6 Page(s)

On the floor of the deep oceans, poised in the middle of the larger tectonic plates, lie vast mudflats that might appear, at first glance, to constitute some of the least valuable real estate on the planet. The rocky crust underlying these "abyssal plains" is blanketed by a sedimentary layer, hundreds of meters thick, composed of clays that resemble dark chocolate and have the consistency of peanut butter. Bereft of plant life and sparsely populated with fauna, these regions are relatively unproductive from a biological standpoint and largely devoid of mineral wealth.

Yet they may prove to be of tremendous worth, offering a solution to two problems that have bedeviled humankind since the dawn of the nuclear age: these neglected suboceanic formations might provide a permanent resting place for high-level radioactive wastes and a burial ground for the radioactive materials removed from nuclear bombs. Although the disposal of radioactive wastes and the sequestering of material from nuclear weapons pose different challenges and exigencies, the two tasks could have a common solution: burial below the seabed.

Also:
http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/96oct/seabed/seabed.htm

Comment: Re:Fracking vs Saltwater Disposal (Score 1) 299

by kEnder242 (#38567254) Attached to: Earthquakes That May Be Related To Fracking Close Ohio Oil Well

The media keeps mixing and confusing fracking with saltwater disposal wells. (remember how much they confuse hackers and crackers)

Fracking is a one time process for increasing porosity of a formation immediately around the well at the time of completion.

A saltwater disposal well is normally a well(oil or gas) that has played out and is used to return unwanted saltwater back where it came from.

Fracking only affects an area within a few hundred feet of the well.

Sure, that all depends on how you define it.

"If fracking is defined as a single fracture of deep shale, that action might be benign. When multiple “fracks” are done in multiple, adjacent wells, however, the risk for contaminating drinking water may rise. If fracking is defined as the entire industrial operation, including drilling and the storage of wastewater, contamination has already been found."

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-truth-about-fracking

Comment: Re:Obligatory turd in punchbowl (Score 3, Informative) 521

by kEnder242 (#38221048) Attached to: Fighting Mosquitoes With GM Mosquitoes

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-wipeout-gene&page=6

"Some people wonder if it is ethical—or safe—to eliminate an organism, even in just a small geographic area. Proponents argue that A. aegypti is an invasive species that has evolved to exploit a solely human niche. “Urban A. aegypti is not part of any significant food chain,” says Phil Lounibos, a mosquito ecologist at the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory. Yet Lounibos doubts whether eliminating A. aegypti would stop dengue transmission permanently. “A previous campaign to eradicate this species from the Americas in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was the primary vector of urban yellow fever, failed miserably,” he says. The invasive Asian tiger mosquito—another good dengue vector—readily occupies niches vacated by A. aegypti. Moreover, both the Cayman and Tapachula mosquito strains, even if successful, are not permanent. Migration of mosquitoes from neighboring regions into Tapachula could foil eradication attempts and mandate frequent releases of the modified males to keep the population in check."

The first Rotarian was the first man to call John the Baptist "Jack." -- H.L. Mencken

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