Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:I have said it before (Score 1) 209

by jythie (#49188029) Attached to: French Nuclear Industry In Turmoil As Manufacturer Buckles
It all depends on who pays the costs. Could you imagine if the coal industry was actually charged for all the costs they incur? There are whole regions that have been abandoned in the US and mining operations can render huge areas uninhabitable due to groundwater contamination. But they do not pick up the tab for that, it is generally spread out between the fed and local people. The nuclear industry is held to higher standards of responsiblity, but that is about it.

Comment: Re:Hmmmm! (Score 1) 328

by jythie (#49187999) Attached to: White House Threatens Veto Over EPA "Secret Science" Bills
However, as these immigrant groups move up the social ladder, the GOP offers them something the democrats do not, the oppurtunity to use their newfound political power on others. The democrats are fairly big on 'remember when you had it hard? why not help someone else?' while the GOP provides 'real americans are better, now that you are a real american you can be crappy to others too, you earned it!'. This has proven to be a pretty effective tactic for courting previously dismissed groups.

Comment: Re:Hmmmm! (Score 1) 328

by jythie (#49187989) Attached to: White House Threatens Veto Over EPA "Secret Science" Bills
Keep in mind, while the whitehouse is important to the party, it is irrelevant to individual members of congress. 'Loyalty' is something trumped, but actual representatives are pretty self serving and are mostly doing what gives them the best chances of being reelected (or revolving door) themselves. Who controls the white house our what legislation change actually makes it through is a secondary concern.

Which is pretty much the personality type you HAVE to have in order to get and keep such offices. People who do put the party first, or getting things done first, do not generally last as long.

Comment: Re:Lots of weird crap coming out of Congress latel (Score 1) 328

by jythie (#49187971) Attached to: White House Threatens Veto Over EPA "Secret Science" Bills
No wondering required, this is a pretty time honored political tactic. Passing bills you know have no chance of making into law (or better yet, no chance of surviving SCOTUS) not only scores points with your own voters but allows the person to escape the negative repercussions of insane bills and the effect they would actually have.

Comment: Re:Yes, I agree (Score 1) 554

by jythie (#49173883) Attached to: Why We Should Stop Hiding File-Name Extensions
Well yes, the issue is not where the metadata of sorts is stored, but how it is expressed to the user.

Though at the moment executables can select their own icon and make it appear like a file icon from some other application. The idea would be to have some element of the icon that is based off the exention but which the file has no other control over, so if something is a file that doulble-clicking it will execute code, there would be some visual cue as such.

Comment: Re:Water (Score 1) 206

by jythie (#49172887) Attached to: What Would Minecraft 2 Look Like Under Microsoft?
Yeah, there are some areas where it could really use some improvement, though striking a 'do what I mean' balance has proven somewhat tricky.

Mod wise, BuildCraft's flood gate introduces some fun new water mechanics, though wow can it make a mess if you do not think through your placement. Luckily many packs also include some expanded sponge mechanics to clean up the mess.

Comment: Re:Here's hoping they bought it to close it down. (Score 4, Insightful) 206

by jythie (#49172843) Attached to: What Would Minecraft 2 Look Like Under Microsoft?

Why do you need this sandbox in order to build stuff? What is wrong with building mechanical stuff using actual wood or metal or meccano or lego? What is wrong with building electrical stuff using actual breadboards and wires and components?

Need? No, but it does have one significant advantage, and that is cost vs return. The game is not that expensive, the hardware to run it is not that expensive, and the flexibility within it is pretty significant. Mechanical and electrical projects both require obtaining raw materials per project and tools can be quite expensive. Minecraft also has a significant multiplayer capability which allows collaborative projects on scales a child hobbyist is less likely to have access to.

I would not call it a replacement for other craft projects, but then again I would not consider mechanical/electrical projects a replacement for fiber crafting or vice versa. Different tools, different experience.

I am not sure what misunderstanding of my argument leads you to say that. I'd be against writing in a word processor which limits your vocabulary and sentence structure for no good reason, certainly.

Any project, wood, writing, music, is going to have limitations on it due to the tools or physical laws.

No, but I'd have a problem if one electronic music creation platform (say... Garageband?) massively dominated all other sorts of music composition online or offline.

Ah, the old 'if something is popular and it is not my thing, it is bad!' argument. Why exactly something that draws people in and gets them creating stuff bad? People gravitate twoards the tool and platform that suit them best, so while it is possible if you remove the option they would find other outlets, those outlets have already been rejected by them for not being what they are looking for.

That is remarkably false. Many school field trips and demonstrations and home experiment kits which were routine when I was young are permitted today, at least in the UK.

Not sure where you are paying attention, but I see a vibrant kit marketplace well in excess of what was available 20 or 30 years ago. I envy kids today and the options they have at just a few clicks of a mouse and a little shipping time. I have even been ordering kids projects or reading plans lately because there are so many and they make great little lazy saturday activities. The only place I can think of that is more limited today would be chemistry sets, which were a small market in the first place and their removal impacts a tiny number of (enthusiastic) people.

But on the whole I have seen the market for beginners and experiment kits in pretty much every domain explode, with more variety easier to obtain than ever.

Comment: Re:Here's hoping they bought it to close it down. (Score 4, Informative) 206

by jythie (#49172173) Attached to: What Would Minecraft 2 Look Like Under Microsoft?
How is giving them a sandbox to build whatever they want tearing their imaginations from them? Are you against writing too? Or music? Are only 'maker' projects acceptable acts of creativity?

Not sure where you are bringing regulation into it since that has pretty minimal impact on the types of projects a child is going to be able to build unless their parents shower them with resources.

Comment: Re:Yes, I agree (Score 1) 554

by jythie (#49171929) Attached to: Why We Should Stop Hiding File-Name Extensions
I had a similar thought. While there is focus on the file extension, if the goal is to make sure users are only double clicking files they should be, having them memorize a bunch of magic 3 letter codes probably will not improve things much.

A better solution would either be something obvious about the icon (runnables bordered in red or something), or even have two different mechanisms for 'load this file in its proper application' and 'run this application'. Having the same action for both behaviors was probably a mistake in the first place.

Comment: Re:New News: Product Design is Hard! (Score 1) 212

I guess one lesson to take away is that it is dangerous to think you know what you are doing, or how a little experience can be worse then none. This was their second product, so they went through all of this before and were successful. This time it got away from them.

Breadth-first search is the bulldozer of science. -- Randy Goebel

Working...