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Google Awarded Broad Patent For Location-Based Advertising 54

Posted by kdawson
from the you-are-here-and-we-own-you dept.
Mashable has a report of a patent that just issued (6-1/2 years after filing) — apparently Google now has a lock on location-based advertising. It's not clear that the search company intends to assert the patent against any other companies (such as emerging rival Apple), but it's useful as leverage. Here is the patent. Update: 03/02 14:34 GMT by S : Reader butlerm noted that the incorrect patent was linked. It now points to the correct URL.

Comment: Tor WILL get people killed, if it hasn't already (Score 1, Insightful) 161

by jyoull (#30857234) Attached to: Tor Users Urged To Update After Security Breach

TOR apologists, no fair modding down these comments just because you don't like them.

I wish the holier than thous behind the Tor movement would stop with their outrageous and indefensible claims about the protections Tor allegedly provides.

I tried to have this discussion with, among others, people who've made "names for themselves" traveling from conference to conference blustering about how Tor is making the Internet safe for unpopular opinions in places where an unpopular opinion can get you disappeared right quick (hello China)... shouted down every time because it's not a POPULAR point of view.

I see that I'm not the only one in this discussion with concerns. Thank god things are changing.

Comment: Re:Tor is going to get people killed. (Score 1) 161

by jyoull (#30857230) Attached to: Tor Users Urged To Update After Security Breach

This is why i said "Tor movement" not "authors of Tor"

It doesn't matter. The innocent, non-techies are not hearing from "the authors of Tor". They're hearing from others who are running around promoting it as the salvation of free speech in non-free places... and they are believed.

Comment: Tor is going to get people killed. (Score -1, Redundant) 161

by jyoull (#30856924) Attached to: Tor Users Urged To Update After Security Breach

I wish the holier than thous behind the Tor movement would stop with their outrageous and indefensible claims about the protections Tor allegedly provides.

I tried to have this discussion with, among others, people who've made "names for themselves" traveling from conference to conference blustering about how Tor is making the Internet safe for unpopular opinions in places where an unpopular opinion can get you disappeared right quick (hello China)... shouted down every time because it's not a POPULAR point of view.

I see that I'm not the only one in this discussion with concerns. Thank god things are changing.

Comment: Re:Not Entirely True is not Entirely True (Score 1) 419

by jyoull (#27603919) Attached to: Lose Your Amazon Account and Your Kindle Dies

Books in the public domain are about ten billion years old in reading/writing-years and not highly relevant to any serious discussion about "reading books".. they are, however, a serious distraction to a serious discussion about electronic books. (nothing against old books, but it's a crappy hedge to say "well, but ther are some books in the world that are not locked down with DRM and thus totally at risk on a Kindle or equivalent).

I'll Believe once contemporary, NY Times Book Review publications by current authors are available in an open format. The sites offered a a counter-example carry anything but that... because no site does.

Oh, booksonboard has books by current authors? Sure. Some.
Maybe you missed the fine print:
Adobe Digital Edition
Copy Permissions: Disabled
Print Permissions: Disabled
Lend Permissions: Disabled
Read Aloud Feature: Disabled

i suppose that's kinda-open but it's not open-open.

Comment: Re:Anybody think that this will change anything? (Score 1) 343

by jyoull (#24421089) Attached to: Judge Rules Sprint Early Termination Fees Illegal

Ah, they don't need to MARKET the customer service stuff, they need to DO it.

Even without the $$$ lock-in, there is an implicit switching cost to changing carriers, consisting of the search-and-compare cost + time spent making the actual change.

I'm suggesting they spend some money on retention rather than spending most of it on attempts to snipe from other carriers. This is the basis of the downward spiral to price-based differentiation.

I suspect that the primary motive to jump carriers is to get a free new phone as it's presently fashion-forward to have the latest handheld, whatever that may be this week. T-Mobile used to offer cheap or free periodic upgrades to existing customers, but stopped.... and I just checked and it looks like the upgrade offer is back again. They've also cut some service costs and removed a number of services whose explanations were incoherent at best. Maybe there's hope after all. I thank government-mandated number portability for this breakthrough.

Nothing is more admirable than the fortitude with which millionaires tolerate the disadvantages of their wealth. -- Nero Wolfe

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