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Comment: Re:tl;dr - it's just like a business (Score 1) 128

by julesh (#46292893) Attached to: Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

He also brings up some timing advice: since businesses are allowed to deduct the costs of doing business, you don't want kickstarter to cut your check on December 31st.

Here in the UK we're allowed to claim expenses in a tax year if they relate to business conducted in that year even if the expense is paid for in a later period (see http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/manuals...). Is this not the case in the US?

Plus it's also irrelevant when kickstarter pay you: you pay the tax on the money you receive in the tax bill for the period in which you earn it, which for preorders (which is what kickstarter finance effectively is in most cases) is the period in which the product is dispatched, not the period you receive the money.

Comment: Re:tl;dr - it's just like a business (Score 1) 128

by julesh (#46292881) Attached to: Kicktaxing: The Crazy Complexity of Paying Tax Correctly On Crowdfunding

He also brings up some timing advice: since businesses are allowed to deduct the costs of doing business, you don't want kickstarter to cut your check on December 31st.

Here in the UK we're allowed to claim expenses in a tax year if they relate to business conducted in that year even if the expense is paid for in a later period (see http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/manuals...). Is this not the case in the US?

Comment: Re:Looks more like a formula (Score 1) 149

by julesh (#46292837) Attached to: Can Reactive Programming Handle Complexity?

Indeed. Their entire product seems to be "we've got this wonderful solution to problems caused by databases that aren't in 3NF: you put your database in 3NF and then calculate the dependent value on the fly" which is of course exactly the same thing we've been doing since 1971 when Codd first described 3NF, but hey, they've got a funky new buzzword for it so it's obviously cool again.

Comment: Re:A few problems... (Score 1) 149

by julesh (#46292819) Attached to: Can Reactive Programming Handle Complexity?

A few problems:

  - What about circular reactions?

  - Is SQL really that right language for encoding business logic?

  - Triggers are kind of an anti-pattern.

  - What about atomicity? What if I need the whole reaction chain to work or none of it.

I'm afraid there more questions than answers with this proposed pattern.

Yep. It's worth noting that in both of the articles linked the only reason the logic is complex is because their databases aren't correctly normalized. To be specific, their tables are not in 3NF.

Comment: Re:64 bit Firefox (Score 1) 257

by julesh (#45318557) Attached to: Chrome Will End XP Support in 2015; Firefox Has No Plans To Stop

On other platforms, this is solved by nspluginwrapper, which runs the plugin as a separate process and just sends events and screen contents between them. Given that most web browsers now do something similar for security and stability (so a plugin can't crash the browser and a security problem in the plugin is isolated), it's not likely to be a significant issue.

Unfortunately, Windows' security model is somewhat different to X's, and under Windows you can't just have two processes rendering into the same window without them being written quite carefully to cooperate with each other. Chrome is able to do this, but AIUI the method they use to make it work is (1) so complicated nobody else has even tried to make it work and (2) relies on a hack that fails if they try to have one of the processes as 64-bit and the other as 32-bit. AFAIK, Chrome is the only browser that runs NPAPI in a separate process under Windows.

Comment: Re:Unrealistic to say the least ! (Score 1) 112

by julesh (#45268813) Attached to: Motorola's "Project Ara" Will Allow Users To Customize Their Smartphones

I don't know how many pins a current Cortex A-9 has but I'd bet it's over 300...

Varies depending on the precise implementation. The smallest I'm aware of is the Allwinner A13, which has a 176-pin package. It's possible that some application-specific chips have fewer: the A13 is designed to run with external RAM and NAND flash, high colour LCD display and multiple additional external peripherals, which explains the pin count -- but if you designed a chip with onboard RAM and storage for an application where monochrome display was standard and you only wanted to talk to a handful of peripherals, I'm sure you could get the pin count down to something a lot more manageable.

Comment: Re:Links ! (Score 1) 242

by julesh (#44816887) Attached to: Wireless Charging Start-Up Claims 30-Foot Radius

I don't know about you but I can't seem to find ANY studies besides the one done by the 9th graders on the effects of wifi on low order plants.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02861092 finding that under 60kW of radiation of the same type as wifi, 90+ hours of exposure is required to prevent plant growth over a radius of 50 metres. So say you're looking at 900 hours exposure (i.e. about the length of time the referenced expirement would have taken) and for simplicities sake 60mW (which is more power than a wifi router actually emits), the radius receiving plant-killing levels of exposure would be about 0.5cm. If you put your plants right on top of the router, they may suffer a touch. Otherwise, they'll be fine -- which suggests something went wrong in the reported experiment other than wireless interference with the plants.

Comment: Re:billion dollar terrorists, yeah (Score 1) 236

by julesh (#44783371) Attached to: Most Tor Keys May Be Vulnerable To NSA Cracking

Yeah, actually if someone is bad enough to make the NSA's top 10 list,

If they can break keys in "a few hours", you don't have to make their top 10 list for them to break your key. "A few hours" per key = a few thousand keys per year. With most targets staying under scrutiny for multiple years, this means you probably only have to be in the top 10,000 to have your keys cracked. I'd imagine it's fairly easy to end up there by mistake.

Comment: Re:Seriously? Android Bounty? Android Twix? (Score 1) 247

by julesh (#44755047) Attached to: Android 4.4 Named 'KitKat'

I've not heard of a Key Lime Pie before (I'm British).

Really? They're in Tesco in the refrigerated dessert isle, right next to the cheesecakes. Live a little, wander around a supermarket and try something you've never tried before. I did that last week and ended up with a tub of Marshmallow Fluff. Hope they consider that in a couple of versions time... :)

Never put off till run-time what you can do at compile-time. -- D. Gries

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