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Comment: Re:Midi-chlorians begone! (Score 1) 403

by juanca (#47077817) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can <em>Star Wars Episode VII</em> Be Saved?

Bear.

(Bare means uncovered, unclothed, naked, unaided...

"I wrestled the big brown bear with my bare hands"

although probably not for long unless the bear had been heavily drugged)

Better yet, "have no effect on who..."

Thank you for explaining the difference unitron, english is not my native language and I don't always get it right :)

Comment: We have something similar at Work (Score 3, Insightful) 385

by juanca (#33489210) Attached to: Best Way To Archive Emails For Later Searching?

At work, we needed to archive (for compliance purposes) all the inbound/outbound email messages of our users (about a 1K aprox). We setup an Ubuntu server with postfix and dovecot IMAP over SSL, using Maildir.

Our users generate about 20K email messages daily, and we store each day in it's own directory, something like this:

INBOX
        |- YYYY
                      |- MM
                                |- DD

The auditors use Evolution to connect to the archive server and search the emails, even though it takes a little while to load a day of emails for the first time, once it's properly loaded searching is really fast. The server is not that powerful, it's a VM with 2 CPUs and 2GB of RAM. You do need a lot of storage though.

Hope this helps.

Bug

Microsoft Zunes Committing Mass Suicide 785

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-bet-a-bricked-zune-is-still-warm dept.
jddeluxe writes "There are multiple reports springing up all over the internet of a mass suicide of Microsoft 30GB Zune players globally. Check Zune forums, Gizmodo, or other such sites; the reports are spreading rapidly, except apparently to the Microsoft official Zune site."
HP

HP Accused of Illegal Exportation To Iran 287

Posted by timothy
from the trade-tends-to-bring-people-together dept.
AdamWeeden writes "According to research done by the Boston Globe, HP has been secretly using a third-party company to sell printers to Iran. This is illegal under a ban instituted in 1995 by then US President Bill Clinton. The third-party company, Redington Gulf, operates out of Dubai and previously stated on their web site that the company began in 1997 with 'a team of five people and the HP supplies as our first product, we started operations as the distributor for Iran,' though now the site has been changed to remove the mention of Iran. Has HP unknowingly been supplying Iran with technology or have they been trying to secretly get by the US government's export restrictions?"
PlayStation (Games)

Breaking Down the Dropping Parts Cost for Sony's PS3 302

Posted by timothy
from the wait-until-it's-all-one-chip dept.
will_die writes "The people at iSuppli have taken apart an October 2008 version of the PlayStation 3 to create a bill of materials, along with providing a comparison to original PS3. The article provides information about the changes Sony has made. One of the big ones was that the hardware has gone from costing $690.23 to the current price of $448.73. This was done using a combination of removing parts (currently 2,820 vs. the original 4,048), cutting the cost of the CPU ($46.46 vs. $64.40), and cutting the cost of the graphics processor to $58.01 from $83.17."
Bug

Tales From the Support Crypt 855

Posted by timothy
from the plug-in-your-mouse-please dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Talking viruses, infected physical devices, and lights that go out are some of the 'problems' Panda Security's tech support service has had to face. Many of them were not a result of computer viruses, but of confused users. This proves once again, that antivirus manufacturers must make a special effort to increase user knowledge regarding computer security and malware effects." For anyone who's been on the receiving end of such questions, now's a good time to tell your cathartic tale.
Science

How Small Can Computers Get? Computing in a Molecule 143

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the nano-pc dept.
ScienceDaily on what the future might bring for atomic-scale computing: "Joachim, the head of the CEMES Nanoscience and Picotechnology Group (GNS), is currently coordinating a team of researchers from 15 academic and industrial research institutes in Europe whose groundbreaking work on developing a molecular replacement for transistors has brought the vision of atomic-scale computing a step closer to reality. Their efforts, a continuation of work that began in the 1990s, are today being funded by the European Union in the Pico-Inside project. ... The team has managed to design a simple logic gate with 30 atoms that perform the same task as 14 transistors, while also exploring the architecture, technology, and chemistry needed to achieve computing inside a single molecule and to interconnect molecules."
Input Devices

Avoiding Wasted Time With Prince of Persia 507

Posted by Soulskill
from the getting-to-the-good-stuff dept.
Zonk pointed out an interesting video presentation by Shamus Young on the importance of the new Prince of Persia, calling it the most innovative game of 2008. Young brings up the fact that many of today's games punish failure by wasting the player's time; being sent back to a check point, the beginning of a level, or sometimes even further. This cuts into the amount of time players have to enjoy the meat of the game — the current challenge they have to overcome. Unfortunately, as Young notes, modern controllers are designed for players who have been gaming since they were kids, and have evolved to be more complicated to operate than an automobile. The combination of these factors therefore limits or prevents the interest of new players; a problem Prince of Persia has addressed well through intuitive controls and the lack of punitive time sinks.

Aren't you glad you're not getting all the government you pay for now?

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