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Ubuntu Download Speeds Beat Windows XP's 515

narramissic writes "Doing a download speed test of his Time Warner cable connection, James Gaskin discovered something odd, something that he is quick to note isn't a rigorous benchmarked lab test. The discovery: His Ubuntu machine 'returned a rating from the test of 22-25mbps over several tests' while the same test done from a Windows XP PC returned a rating of 12-14mbps. The two computers used in the test are 'almost identical: both off-lease Compaq small form factor D515s, part of the very popular corporate desktop D500 family. Both have Pentium 4 processors running at 2GHz. The Ubuntu machine has 768MB of RAM, while the XP box has only 512MB of RAM. Both run Firefox 3 as their browser.' Gaskin's question: Can a little extra RAM make that much difference in Internet download speeds or does Ubuntu handles networking that much faster than Windows XP?"

Braid, Games As Art, and Interpretation 37

Zonk points out an opinion piece at Gamers With Jobs about Braid, an independent platformer that received high praise when it was released a few months ago. It's often held up as an example of "games as art," and in this article, Julian Murdoch comments on the act of interpreting such art. He takes Braid's creator, Johnathan Blow, to task for the effect his comments have on the game and its players: "My frustration with Braid is multiplied because it would seem to have been designed with me specifically in mind. I am a student of the obscure. I am pathologically drawn to books, movies, games, and passages of scripture that are dense, difficult, and which hide (and thus reveal) meaning behind layers of art and artifice. Games lend themselves to this layering more than any other medium. The casual player of Oblivion, System Shock 2, Fallout 3 or Bioshock can have an extraordinarily story-light experience if they simply 'play' the games. One layer deeper, a close reading of the environments informs deeper levels of story. Deeper still, evidence in the form of written texts and audio tracks provides footnotes, side-plots and appendices to a central story. ... by the end of my Braid experience, I felt like Blow had specifically constructed something that would generate emails and forum posts begging him to please tell us 'what it all means.'" There is some interesting discussion in the comments, including a response from Blow himself.

Submission + - HP's Answer To Dell Alienware - The Blackbird 002 (

MojoKid writes: "After HP's acquisition of Voodoo PC last year, many speculated that the company's entrance into the high-end gaming PC market was imminent. After all, why else would they have bought Voodoo in the first place? On their own, HP was also secretly working on their own gaming PC and its codename was Blackbird. However, Blackbird wasn't being designed solely by the newly acquired engineers from Voodoo. In fact, the Blackbird project was well underway at HP before the acquisition was finalized. The two did collaborate on a design though, that ultimately became the product that is shown here at HotHardware — a high-end, fully customizable machine that's poised to do battle with the best gaming systems the industry has to offer. Benchmarks and a full design showcase are included in the article."

Submission + - Copyright Alliance: Fair use not a consumer right (

KingSkippus writes: "In response to a complaint to the FCC filed by the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) to change copyright warnings before movies and sporting events, Executive Director Patrick Ross of the Copyright Alliance tells us in an editorial that "fair use is not a consumer right." The Copyright Alliance is backed by such heavy-hitters as the MPAA, RIAA, Disney, Business Software Alliance, and perhaps most interestingly, Microsoft, who is also backing the CCIA's complaint."

Submission + - Sony planning to offer movie downloads...again (

jtroutman writes: Sony has announced that it plans to make its most popular movies available for download. "We want to set business models, pricing models, distribution models like Jobs did for music, but for the film industry," said Michael Arrieta, the senior vice-president of Sony Pictures.
What they don't mention is that this isn't their first foray into the movie download business. Several years ago Sony, along with the support of other major studios, funded a company called Moviefly, which eventually became Movielink, which is now part of Blockbuster TotalAccess.


Submission + - Blockbuster throws hat into movie download busines (

jtroutman writes: Stepping into the ring to compete with entities such as Amazon, CinemaNow and, of course, NetFlix, Blockbuster announced today the acquisition of Movielink, LLC. The deal had been scheduled to take place earlier this year, but was quashed amid trouble between the then CEO, John Antioco, and the Board of Directors.

Adapt. Enjoy. Survive.