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Comment: Netflix - Customer Friendly? (Score 1) 278 278

Too true that Netflix doesn't need to offer this, with this ruling that point is even backed-up. But, can any internet based service these days really do anything that's considered a "dick-move"? The people are fickle, and "bad news" travels a heck of a lot faster these days than it did in the past.

Frankly, I think it's a heck of a risk to fight it. They're probably going to end up putting it in anyways.

Comment: Knowledge (Score 1) 809 809

I would like to echo what the above poster said. The field of security is soooo large, to find someone that knows everything off the top of their head is asking quite alot. Granted there are those out there that can give you the exact rundown of how everything from PKI to Cryptokey works...

But, they're rare and you're going to have to search for a long time to find them and then once you do you'll probably need to pay a premium for them. On top of that you'll need to make sure you give them enough of a challenge every day so they can maintain that level of knowledge. As we all know, if you don't use it, you forget it. I happen to work in the field you're describing and I know I've forgotten enough to fill the Grand Canyon a couple times over.

That being said, encrypting an email is pretty general information, any architect in IS should probably know that.

Comment: Why a button, try a dog! (Score 1) 327 327

You may want to look into getting a dog. They're more reliable than a 2 year old with a panic button. I get what you're thinking and it's good that you want to watch out for your family, but, I think a proactive approach may be wiser here.

I read about these guys, it may be something you want to look into. These dogs have the ability to detect a seizure is coming before it happens.

http://www.epilepsy.com/get-he...

+ - Self-Repairing, Reconfigurable Electronic Circuits Take a Step Closer to Reality->

Zothecula writes: If electronic circuits could automatically reconfigure their internal conductive pathways as required, microchips could function as many different circuits on the one device. If many of these devices were then incorporated into larger pieces of equipment, such as robots, it is possible that self-sufficient, self-sustaining machines could change to suit their environment or even reconfigure broken or damaged pathways to repair themselves. Promising applications like these – and more – could one day be made possible if technology resulting from recent research into atomic manipulation at École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) comes to fruition.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Falling prices (Score 1) 334 334

It's good to see and a definite short term benefit will be realized. Lord knows it cuts down on our commute cost. I think one thing that would need to be addressed is the absolute need for most families in rural areas to have more than 1 vehicle.

I live in small-town Minnesota and I don't know any family that only has 1 vehicle. I think the only way we could do this is to really push a paradigm shift to where companies push more for moving their work-force home where possible. This has been done somewhat, but, we see many companies moving their workforce back to the office too. Frankly, I feel office-work is economically a bad choice, ecologically irresponsible, & doesn't foster work-life balance.

Granted, this won't be a home-run as far as reduction... but, every bit helps!

Comment: Personal online information (Score 4, Insightful) 193 193

Just one more company giving one more reason why corporations should not be allowed to store personal information beyond what is absolutely necessary. Birthday would not necessarily need to be stored anyplace directly accessible, unless it was legally required but could instead be replaced by a flag for "above 13", "above 18", "above 21". If they absolutely needed to have the birthday for representation or audit purposes it could be stored in an offline version that could be brought online as needed.

In the end, efficiency was prioritized over the need to secure personally identifiable information (PII). eBay should not have stored so much PII in the same database, it should have been stored separately and linked on retrieval.

Sadly, security requirements being ignored or missed during design is a commonplace occurrence and they don't get fixed until something like this brings them to light.

Comment: Constructive Criticism (Score 1) 2219 2219

The technical prowess of the crowd that contributes to this site is far above most other sites. The site looks like it was made with Wordpress, this is /. it should be better than that. Granted the old site was too, but, at least the story previews were more compact so you could more easily scan the articles. Also, it's hard to tell the subject line from the comment area, they should be more easily distinguished.

Comment: Re:4 years too old (Score 1) 81 81

Why do I never have moderator points when I need them! Well said... and in regards to the investment reply. I understand what you're saying, but, the greatest investment a country can make is an investment that raises the standards of human life.

If they can reduce the fraud which will in turn allow them to place that money into much needed hands or re-appropriate that money into making lives better... Well, I don't think it matters how many people it actually gets off of welfare, it's stitching the gash vs. cleaning the scrape.

+ - How Gamers Could Save the (Real) World->

Nerval's Lobster writes: Three years ago, game designer and author Jane McGonigal argued that saving the human race is going to require a major time investment—in playing video games. “If we want to solve problems like hunger, poverty, climate change, global conflict, obesity, I believe that we need to aspire to play games online for at least 21 billion hours a week [up from 3 billion today], by the end of the next decade,” she said in a TED talk. Her message was not ignored—and it has indirectly contributed to the formation of something called the Internet Response League (IRL). The small group has a big goal: to harness gamers’ time and use it to save lives after disasters, natural or otherwise. The idea is to insert micro-tasks into games, specifically asking gamers to tag photos of disaster areas. With the IRL plugin, each image would be shown to at least three people, who tag the photo as showing no damage, mild damage, or severe damage. The Internet Response League has been in talks with a couple of indie developers, including one that’s developing a new MMO. Mosur said they’ve tried to get in touch with World of Warcraft maker Blizzard, but haven’t had any luck yet. Blizzard did not return a request for comment from Slashdot.
Link to Original Source

+ - August Patch Tuesday: Microsoft Takes Out 23 Bugs in Windows, IE, Exchange

SmartAboutThings writes: It’s that time of the month when Microsoft released its Patch Tuesday aimed at fixing vulnerabilities. Last month’s Patch Tuesday posed some issues for users as they were still causing bugs, being “half-baked”. This is the eighth Patch Tuesday of the year and it comes with eight new security bulletins (coincidence?) with only three being rated as “Critical” and five as “Important”. The eight security bulletins released by Microsoft address 23 vulnerabilities from Windows, Internet Explorer and Exchange. The most important patches, as per Microsoft’s recommendation, are MS13-059 (Internet Explorer) and MS13-060 (Windows XP and Server 2003.). After applying those first priority patches, you should patch every other software from Microsoft that you are using to make sure you have a top-notch security

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