Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Not about ease, about authority (Score 3, Interesting) 231

by jsrjsr (#47904325) Attached to: School Installs Biometric Fingerprint System For Cafeteria
The last time I bought alcohol, I happened to have my 17-year-old son with me. The cashier wanted to see his ID as well as mine. She wasn't going to sell to me because he was with me! Said it was the stores new policy. I asked to speak with the manager, who confirmed that it was the store policy. When I told him this policy was stupid, he backed down and sold me the alcohol. This "It's for the CHILDREN!" crap has got to stop!

Comment: Re:"they shouldn't email you?" (Score 1) 232

by jsrjsr (#47698185) Attached to: Daimler's Solution For Annoying Out-of-office Email: Delete It
One of my former managers asked how to contact my during deer hunting season one year. I told him, "Call my cousin at the feed mill. He won't know where I am, but he can leave a message for me at the hunting shack. I'll call you back the next day." He decided he didn't need to know the feed mill's telephone number after all.

+ - House of Reps Gives Itself Permission to Not Report Privately-Sponsored Travel 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The U.S. House Ethics Committee has quietly done away with the requirement for House members to reveal all privately-sponsored travel on their annual financial-disclosure forms. "The move, made behind closed doors and without a public announcement...reverses more than three decades of precedent." The requirement was put in place in the 1970s after the Watergate scandal. Free trips for congressmen, their families, and their aids was at its highest last year since "the influence-peddling scandal that sent lobbyist Jack Abramoff to prison." These types of disclosures must still be made to the House's Office of the Clerk, but reporters, watchdogs, and the public in general refer to the annual financial-disclosure form to keep tabs on who pays their representatives and in what form that payment is made."

+ - There's More Fiber in Fast Food Than You Realize 1

Submitted by danomac
danomac (1032160) writes "It looks like McDonald's, along with other fast-food chains like Burger King and Wendy's, put more fiber in your burger than you realize.

Listed in the ingredients is "microcrystalline cellulose", also known as wood fiber. Fast-food chains have been using this for quite some time due to the cost effectiveness.

This is also not just in meat, but in all sorts of ingredients like cheese, sauces, etc."

+ - DARPA demos lightweight, 94GHz silicon system on a chip-> 1

Submitted by coondoggie
coondoggie (973519) writes "Looking to bring lighter, more powerful and less expensive systems for various applications such as communications, radar or guidance systems, DARPA said this week it had recently demonstrated an all-silicon, microchip-sized system on a chip that runs at 94 GHz. DARPA claims that this chip is the first time a silicon-only package has achieved such a high frequency, which falls in the millimeter-wave range."
Link to Original Source

+ - Old disagreements over potential risks of 1918-like influenza study surface

Submitted by bmahersciwriter
bmahersciwriter (2955569) writes "After almost a year of wrangling over gain of function influenza studies involving H5N1 in 2011 and 2012, the Wisconsin institutional biosafety committee (bizarrely? brazenly?) still deemed similar work — by one of the same labs involved — on a 1918-like influenza bug to fall outside the remit of dual use research of concern. Documents obtained by Nature suggest laxity in the biosecurity assessment. But NIAID set them straight and forced them to re assess the work. The research was published early last month."

Everyone can be taught to sculpt: Michelangelo would have had to be taught how not to. So it is with the great programmers.

Working...