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Comment: Re: Removed after Initial sales spike (Score 1) 310

The controversy surrounding the game with the Russians comes from a mission in which you play a sleeper agent in a Russian terrorist cell, and participate with them in a mass killing scenario at a shopping mall. It's more about the player's active role in the killing of innocent citizens than the fact that it's Russians that you're with.

Comment: found one of these in a used car I bought (Score 1) 271

by jsh1972 (#48343475) Attached to: Dealer-Installed GPS Tracker Leads To Kidnapper's Arrest in Maryland
I bought a salvaged car (04 grand prix) and whoever the previous owner was, they apparently had an arrangement similar to this guy's. While putting a new stereo in, I found a tracking device inner the dash on the driver's side, kind of behind where the A/C controls where. It was around the size of a pack of cigarettes, had LEDs for GPS and TX/RX if memory serves, it also had a SIM card, which I removed immediately. I looked it up by googling the FCC id number and found the company's web site. I was kind of spooked when I found it until I realized it was probably put there by a dealer catering to high credit risk customers, or perhaps it was a used rental car or something. I eventually just cut the wires and pulled the whole thing out.

Comment: Re: Update to Godwin's law? (Score 1) 575

by jsh1972 (#48043775) Attached to: Obama Administration Argues For Backdoors In Personal Electronics
Actually, they were classified as "munitions", which are defined as military weapons, ammunition, equipment, and stores. The "equipment and stores" part is more applicable here, I don't think anyone would argue that crypto is an actual weapon, as in capable of causing death and destruction. The ban on selling PlayStation 2s to Iraq for fear of them being used as brains of cruise missiles was a situation where the banned thing could be considered a weapon, crypto would be more analogous to releasing radios with military channels.

Comment: Re: It seems to me... (Score 1) 470

by jsh1972 (#48016015) Attached to: The Physics of Space Battles
I understand how subtractive imaging works, but the cover they were under was most definitely not moving, it was the hollow crust left from lava flows. I suppose they could see where they had disappeared from, and where they reappeared at if they are careless enough to come out in the open, but the tubes they traveled in did not move, they were giant hollow tubes many kilometres long.

Each honest calling, each walk of life, has its own elite, its own aristocracy based on excellence of performance. -- James Bryant Conant

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