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Comment: Re:Argh (Score 1) 70

by jschottm (#43398283) Attached to: Book Review: MODx Revolution - Building the Web Your Way

I believe part of the point is that anyone who brags about having nine degrees (with very, very few exceptions) is full of it. Not that they're lying but that the degrees that they hold are basically worthless. I've worked with some of the top engineering professors in their fields - they typically have two to four degrees, at least one of which is a PhD. Having nine associates degrees (err, certificates) is kind of like having 9 white belts from different martial arts schools. Bragging about it shows a lack of understanding of the value of education.

Kind of like "Instrumental in the development and implementation of 3ringmetals.com to brand the name of the worlds largest manufacturer of ring metals into the single dominating force on the internet..."

Comment: Re:Obligatory car analogy (Score 1) 284

by jschottm (#43301639) Attached to: Schneier: Security Awareness Training 'a Waste of Time'

NO, and I mean ZERO, security breeches that I have been aware of in the last two decades can be traced to password guessing.

I really hope you don't work for any company I'm affiliated with.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/01/07/twitter_hack_explained/
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/twitter-hacked-again--with-a-guessed-password-1748730.html

Guessed passwords are used every day to get a foothold into servers and applications.

Weak passwords are very problematic. One of the first things that an attacker is going to do if they can get access to the password hashes is run them through JtR or the like. You do know that password hasehs under a certain length in non-AD Windows aren't salted and can more or less instantly be cracked using rainbow tables, right?

But users do have problems with long and complex passwords which is part of why two factor authentication is increasingly important.

Comment: Re:they need a service (Score 1) 222

by jschottm (#43100433) Attached to: 'Bandwidth Divide' Could Bar Some From Free Online Courses

You said 100KB/second.

KB is not a standard measurement of bandwidth for video. Again, did you mean kb (kilobit) or kB (kilobyte)?

Was this some sort of laughable attempt to appear knowledgeable

Indeed, but don't be too hard on yourself, just try to learn so you don't repeat the same mistakes.

Comment: Re:they need a service (Score 2) 222

by jschottm (#43074967) Attached to: 'Bandwidth Divide' Could Bar Some From Free Online Courses

Video is bandwidth intensive. There's no way around that (though H.265 will help compared to the current generation). Whether video is strictly necessary for online education is another question, but very little of Coursera's network requirement is "scripts and redirects and google metrics."

They do (at least for the classes I took) let you just download the videos. No overhead there and even if you live in a rural location without access to high speed internet, if you can make it to a library or place with a high speed connection, you can save it and watch at home. The tests/assignments were all pretty low bandwidth - nothing dialup couldn't have handled if it had to.

Comment: Re:Is China even behind at all? (Score 1) 283

by jschottm (#40389821) Attached to: Shenzhou 9 Sparks Renewed Debate On Space Race With China

High ground has little meaning in the world of ICBMs. It's all about (theoretically) firing them fast enough to kill your enemy before they can counterstrike.

The moon is an average of 380,000 km from the earth. The LGM-30 has a maximum speed (which it only reaches at the terminal phase of flight) of 24,100 km/h. Even if we theorize that without having to break gravity that the missile is 5 times as fast (pulling that number out of the air based on the fact that escape velocity from the moon is roughly 1/5 of earth), you're still looking at over 3 hours to get close to the earth.

The LGM-30, on the other hand, starts deploying the payload towards the target about five minutes after launch.

If there _had_ to be nuclear war, the powers that be would be *delighted* to get a three hour headstart for the bunkers (and time to properly target incoming missiles with defensive measures).

Lunar missiles would also be subject to ridiculously high maintenance costs, damage from the hazards of space, and would either have to have human operators living there (again, incredibly expensive) or you'd have to trust remote control of launches.

Comment: Re:Lock Out (Score 3, Interesting) 242

by jschottm (#40386643) Attached to: Locked-Down Tablets Endanger FLOSS For End Users

I've bought plenty of GPL software through retailers who didn't have to supply me with the source code.

"Your license to each App Store Product is subject to the Licensed Application End User License Agreement set forth below, and you agree that such terms will apply unless the App Store Product is covered by a valid end user license agreement entered into between you and the licensor of that App Store Product (the "Application Provider"), in which case the Application Providerâ(TM)s end user license agreement will apply to that App Store Product ... You acknowledge that: you are acquiring the license to each Third-Party Product from the Application Provider"

Even if your argument was true, all they'd have to do is provide the ability to download the source code (which they get to charge for).

Comment: Re:Cheaper to rent a video (Score 2) 376

by jschottm (#40315529) Attached to: Verizon Wireless Goes Ahead With 'Bucket' Data Plans

Please note that I disapprove of the new pricing plan, so don't take this as an endorsement of it.

It's not a truly terrible thing to be discouraging users from doing heavy duty video on cellular connections. 3/4G data connections can push a lot of data but the tower's network connection can easily get swamped. Encouraging users to load movie rentals at home from their broadband connection is a good thing - other than the spur of the moment aspect, there's no reason that users have to transfer those files over the air.

Comment: Re:UDP file transfer? (Score 2) 323

by jschottm (#39791967) Attached to: Google Drive Goes Live

Trying to move video files with TCP is silly.

No, TCP is the protocol to use if you're moving video because you want to do an accurate transmission of the data and adding error checking to UDP is silly when there's a protocol that does it out of the box.

If you're talking on-demand playback, you might have a point, but the majority of the users out there have UDP port filtered and possibly firewalled and it's easier to just send data to TCP port 80 than deal with firewall issues.

Comment: Re:Occupy Wall Street protesters are creating thei (Score 1) 451

by jschottm (#38544120) Attached to: Occupy Protesters Are Building a Facebook for the 99%

Nope. The people can control a specific industry. For example, it would not be completely inaccurate to describe the British Health Service as socialized medicine. However, if the forced transfer of the people's money to private institutions and their shareholders is about as close to the opposite of socialization as you can get.

Administration: An ingenious abstraction in politics, designed to receive the kicks and cuffs due to the premier or president. -- Ambrose Bierce

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