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Submission + - Linux Foundation: Security Threatens 'Golden Age' Of Open Source

Mickeycaskill writes: The executive director Linux Foundation has outlined its plans to improve open source security, which could otherwise threaten a 'golden age' which has created billion dollar companiesand seen Microsoft and Apple among others embrace open technologies.

The organisation launched the Core infrastructure Initiative (CII), a body backed by 20 major IT firms, last year and is investing millions of dollars in grants, tools and other support for open source projects that have until now been underfunded.

This was never move obvious than following the discovery of the Heartbleed Open SSL bug last year.

“Almost the entirety of the internet is entirely reliant on open source software,” he said. “We’ve reached a golden age of open source. Virtually every technology and product and service is created using open source.

“Heartbleed literally broke the security of the Internet. Over a long period of time, whether we knew it or not, became dependent on open source for the security and Integrity of the internet.”

“We want to find the projects on the Internet that are broken and fix them. We have raised a multi-million fund to provide grants to projects to help them out."

“We’re not talking about some new technology product or service, we’re talking about your privacy, your security. We believe creating a more secure, more robust Internet is good for all of us.”

Submission + - Linus: "2016 Will Be the Year of the ARM Laptop" (

jones_supa writes: Linus Torvalds took the stage at the latest LinuxCon 2015 that took place in Dublin, Ireland, and talked about a number of things, including security and the future for Linux on ARM hardware. There is nothing that will blow your mind, but there are a couple of interesting statements nonetheless. Chromebooks are slowly taking over the world and a large number of those Chromebooks are powered by ARM processors. "I'm happy to see that ARM is making progress. One of these days, I will actually have a machine with ARM. They said it would be this year, but maybe it'll be next year. 2016 will be the year of the ARM laptop," said Linus excitedly. He also explained that one of the problems now is actually finding people to maintain Linux. It's not a glorious job, and it usually entails answering emails seven days a week. Finding someone with the proper set of skills and the time to do this job is difficult.

Submission + - Debian dropping Linux Standard Base (

basscomm writes: For years (as seen on Slashdot) the Linux Standard Base has been developed as an attempt to reduce the differences between Linux distributions in an effort significant effort. However, Debian Linux has announced that they are dropping support for the Linux Standard Base due to a lack of interest.

If [Raboud's] initial comments about lack of interest in LSB were not evidence enough, a full three months then went by with no one offering any support for maintaining the LSB-compliance packages and two terse votes in favor of dropping them. Consequently, on September 17, Raboud announced that he had gutted the src:lsb package (leaving just lsb-base and lsb-release as described) and uploaded it to the "unstable" archive. That minimalist set of tools will allow an interested user to start up the next Debian release and query whether or not it is LSB-compliant—and the answer will be "no."

Submission + - One uncle's gift of Linux .. (

An anonymous reader writes: The year was 1996. December 1996 to be more precise. I had just finished my first semester of college and was spending Christmas at my uncle's apartment in Port Jefferson, New York.

My uncle was a PhD student studying computational geometry and eager to show me some of his work. He was especially interested in telling me about this free Unix-like operating system that came with a book he had bought.

Submission + - Linux Foundation puts the cost of replacing open source at $5 billion. (

chicksdaddy writes: Everybody recognizes that open source software incredibly valuable, by providing a way to streamline the creation of new applications and services. But how valuable, exactly? The Linux Foundation has released a new research paper ( that tries to put a price tag on the value of open source, and the price they've come up with is eye-popping: $5 billion. That's how much the Foundation believes it would cost for companies to have to rebuild or develop from scratch the software residing in its collaborative projects.

To arrive at that figure, the Foundation analyzed the code repositories of each one of its projects using the Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO) to estimate the total effort required to create these projects. With 115,013,302 total lines of source code, LF estimated the total amount of effort required to retrace the steps of collaborative development to be 41,192.25 person-years — or 1,356 developers 30 years to recreate the code base present in The Linux Foundation’s current collaborative projects listed above.

Submission + - LibreOffice turns 5 (

An anonymous reader writes: Italo Vignoli, founding member of The Document Foundation, reflects on the project's five-year mark in an article on

LibreOffice was launched as a fork of on September 28, 2010, by a tiny group of people representing the community in their capacity as community project leaders. At the time, forking the office suite was a brave—and necessary—decision, because the open source community did not expect to survive for long under Oracle stewardship.

Submission + - Persistent "pipes" in Linux (

An anonymous reader writes: In a project I'm working on I ran into the requirement of having some sort of persistent FIFO buffer or pipe in Linux, i.e. something file-like that could accept writes from a process and persist it to disk until a second process reads (and acknowledges) it. The persistence should be both across process restarts as well as OS restarts.
Unfortunately in the Linux world such a primitive does not exist (named pipes/FIFOs do not persist their contents to disk and — being in-memory — have low limits on how much data they can contain). The thing that comes closer to this is logrotation (but this has issues when the consumer might stop for extended periods of time). So I figured I could try to come up with something better using hole punching.

Submission + - BOSS Linux - a debian based distro from CDAC (

Abhishek Dey Das writes: CDAC introduced BOSS, a debian based distro to be used by all Government institutions across India, Government funded schools, and even ATM machines. The distro is free to download and comes with added tools and more localization options.

Submission + - Best Reliable Laptop for Linux?

An anonymous reader writes: I will be looking for a new laptop soon and I'm mostly interested in high reliability and Linux friendliness. I have been using an MSI laptop (with Windows 7) for the last five years as my main workhorse and did not have a single, even minor problem with the hardware nor the OS. It turned out to be a slam-dunk, although I didn't do any particular research before buying it, so I was
just lucky. I would like to be more careful this time around, so this is a hardware question: What laptop do you recommend for high reliability and Linux? I will also appreciate any advice on what to avoid and any unfortunate horror stories; I guess we can all learn from those. Thanks.

Submission + - Thanks To Valve, More Than 1,500 Games Are Now On Linux (

An anonymous reader writes: The Steam Store crossed the threshold this morning of having 1,500 games natively available for Linux. Timberman, a 0.99$ video game was the 1,500th title, but while there are a lot of indie games available for Linux, in the past three years have been a number of high profile AAA Linux games too.

The opossum is a very sophisticated animal. It doesn't even get up until 5 or 6 PM.