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Comment: Re:Here we go again (Score 1) 455

by pla (#48434821) Attached to: As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines
The ideology in question simply states that women are equal to men. That's it.

Do homeless white males still need to check their privilege?

Kindly explain "eye rape" to me, please.

Can misandry exist?

Does giving preferential treatment to any group, at the expense of another, meet your requirement for "equality"?

Comment: Re:Here we go again (Score 1) 455

by pla (#48434461) Attached to: As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines
You are saying there is no hatred

No. He said "there's no hatred directed at women here" - A categorically true statement, given that I made no mention of women at all. None.

Disagree with my stance on the merits of basing your world-view on mock indignation, if you will. But do make an attempt to stick to the topic at hand, rather than whatever strawmen (sorry, "strawpersons") you'd prefer to attack.

Comment: Re:Here we go again (Score 1, Interesting) 455

by pla (#48427741) Attached to: As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines
The first person to use the term "SJW" has probably just proven the point of the article.

Funny thing about using a group's identity pejoratively...

If retards didn't exist, we wouldn't call them retards. And if we considered retards a good thing, we wouldn't use that word as an insult. Similarly, much as "retarded" replaced "idiot" and "moron", "SJW" itself replaced "PC", once that older term had become too commonplace.

If you manage to make the actual use of "SJW" gauche, you can expect to simply see something else replace it - Of course, I suppose people could just start calling them the more accurate "indignation whores", but that seems a bit too blunt to adopt for common usage.

Comment: Re:About time for a Free baseband processor (Score 2) 200

by pla (#48386429) Attached to: Department of Justice Harvests Cell Phone Data Using Planes
Nowhere does it mention the Declaration. Go ahead, try citing it as legal authority in a courtroom and see how far it gets you, Mr. Constitutional Scholar.

Don't confuse "legal" for "ethical", Mr. Rules Lawyer.

All people have a right - An obligation - To resist an oppressive government to the greatest extent possible. For some people, that means voting. For some, it means running for office. For some, it means running issues ads. For some, it means stalling paperwork as a low-level clerk in some office deep in a government building. And for some... It means preparing for when, not if, all the lesser options fail to achieve the desired result.

FWIW, I don't think we've reached that point - yet. Getting harder and harder not to notice that the asshats in Washington seem intent on getting us there as rapidly as possible, however.

Comment: Re:Huh (Score 1) 223

by pla (#48386313) Attached to: Comet Probe Philae To Deploy Drill As Battery Life Wanes
They know everything that could go wrong in ten years of space travel.

...Except landing in a shadow in the most important 30 seconds of the mission?


Though overall, I agree, and offer the ESA a hearty congratulations - Well done! Just somewhat disappointing that the coolest part of the whole mission, while "technically" successful, won't get to do anything more than drill a few small holes.

Comment: Re:Huh (Score 1, Insightful) 223

by pla (#48385689) Attached to: Comet Probe Philae To Deploy Drill As Battery Life Wanes
Y'know, I realize that all the self-righteous "Papa knows best" crowd recently learned the term "Dunning Kruger", but casually tossing it out as a way to instantly shut down any discussion works about as well as complaining about "privilege".

More importantly - For all you know, koan works for the Mars Rover program, and has a legitimate right to mock the ESA's lack of foresight.

On a purely practical level - Yes, more instruments means more weight. But to have no maneuvering capabilities, not even the ability to flip itself over if it landed on its side, or make short hops around the surface - Keep in mind the gravity here - A tiny piston slightly off-center on each side of the cube would have added a few hundred grams and meant a billion dollar mission wouldn't die later today because of shadows, of all things.

Comment: Re:"Court order"? (Score 5, Insightful) 98

by pla (#48378141) Attached to: Carmakers Promise Not To Abuse Drivers' Privacy
What does "court order" mean? Are they going to require an actual warrant, or will they just cough up your data on any request by a court? Because if a warrant ain't required, I ain't interested.

Even if they do require a warrant, I ain't interested. They can keep their BS extra features that require tracking me. I can call AAA on my own. I can read a map on my own. I can remember to schedule my regular maintenance without automated reminders based on telemetry data.

Free hint, automakers - Any feature that requires data to leave my car, I will actively disable. And even any feature that requires the car to log data locally, I will minimize to the greatest extent possible. I don't trust you, I don't trust the NSA, I don't trust the state government not to retroactively issue speeding tickets in a revenue-tight year (like they've already proven they will do with EZ-Pass type toll transponders - You know, the ones they promised (just like in TFA) they'd never use for anything other than paying your tolls).

Someone want to get rich? Develop an ODBC-II dongle that erases my car's EDR every time I turn the car off... Or for that matter, continually if possible.

Comment: Re:yea no (Score 1) 319

by pla (#48372691) Attached to: Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday
Think you're smarter than a Supreme court justice?

Argumentum ad verecundiam. Try again.


Do not assume that you know the law better than a prosecutor that's poring over emails after your dean forwarded them on with a note "Hey frank, I hate this kid... screwer him if you can"

The fact that, given "six lines written by the hand of the most honest of men, [you] will find something in them which will hang him" doesn't have any bearing on whether or not plagiarism itself counts as a crime. Which it doesn't.


I never said it would be a copyright law you broke. You have no idea which laws you could break... none what-so-ever...

Put up or shut up - Pick an actual law, or cede the point.

Comment: Re:Ok, I am naive, but... (Score 1) 319

by joss (#48371737) Attached to: Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Sure, I know. Few things are truly novel and one has to be able to do all of it, including the grunt work. It's just that there's no point doing something original when its faster to copy, so one copies up to the point where either nobody has done it before or its just easier to reinvent it oneself than find and incorporate somebody else's solution I just took that attitude a little earlier than I was supposed to. I wasn't trying to be clever, I just wasn't ready to start working hard at the time.

Comment: Re:type of assignment (Score 1) 319

by joss (#48371631) Attached to: Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Do you mean, the repeated code, or the cool professor is as likely as winning the lottery ? Either way, its more common than that.

Same thing happened to me in college, except I didnt even discuss the assignment with him. It was a lisp project and we both decided to do it as purely as possible (which at the time meant no assignments - what today would be called functional style). The end result was about 150 lines of lisp (equivalent to maybe 2k lines of C). Our code was identical except for some identifier names.

Comment: Re:yea no (Score 1) 319

by pla (#48370233) Attached to: Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday
First, I agree with almost all of what you said. Never implicate yourself. Ever. Don't lie about it, don't tell the truth about it, don't say anything about it unless compelled to speak by a court (and even then, run every word by your lawyer first). However, before we go all tough-guy with "get a warrant"...


By admitting to copying someone else's code you could be confessing to a real crime that could result in time in prison.

Complete and utter bullshit. Plagiarism does not commit a crime, period. Academic violation, yes. Institutional violation, yes. Intellectual violation, yes. Probably a workplace violation in some cases (though typically only if you create content for your employer intended for public consumption). But criminal violation? No, no, no.

At most, the real author could sue for copyright violation - non-commercial, academic, non-distributed copyright violation. Good luck even finding a lawyer to waste time on that goldmine of a case.

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." -- Bertrand Russell

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