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Submission + - Starbucks, Google Invading Privacy in Korea (koreaittimes.com)

mateomiguel writes: "Starbucks and Google have teamed up to offer free WiFi in South Korea. Google foots the bill for free Starbucks' WiFi and gets users redirected to its Korean language portal after logging into WiFi services. However, before logging in users are required to submit their real name and resident registration number (or foreign registration number in the case of foreigners). This may be too much information to require in order to offer free WiFi access.

There are two twists to the story. Originally, when the service was launched, users only had to use temporary usernames and passwords to log in (http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2898718), but some time since December 2008 it was changed to full legal names and social security numbers.

Secondly, Google Korea just caused a big media stir in April by circumventing a new Korean government regulation that required any web portal which accepted user content (such as comments or videos) to ask for real names and registration numbers of all its users. Google Korea sidestepped this issue on its YouTube Korea site by disabling the ability for users on the Korean YouTube site from uploading content or posting comments. However, users could still access the international YouTube site without problems. This seemed to infuriate the KCC and caused them to start a 'legal review' of Google in order to try to nail them for some sort of violation as revenge. (http://english.hani.co.kr/arti/english_edition/e_editorial/350258.html)."

Google

Submission + - Google Filters Torrents From Search Results (torrentfreak.com) 1

HiddenL writes: According to TorrentFreak.com:

Google has been filtering its search results for years. That's proven very useful for the Chinese government, and of course content owner representatives like the MPAA and RIAA. According to Google, the filtering of torrents from the search results is a response to the DMCA complaints they receive. The owner of SumoTorrent told TorrentFreak that he discovered that A search on Google for sumotorrent now triggers the following message at the bottom of the results page:

In response to a complaint we received under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act, we have removed 1 result(s) from this page. If you wish, you may read the DMCA complaint that caused the removal(s) at ChillingEffects.org.
A search for other BitTorrent sites like Torrentspy and Torrentreactor comes up with the same message (note. the sites are still indexed but some results are removed).
Apparently "Do No Evil" includes mass filtering of legitimate content.

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