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Comment: Re:Were nerds here... use the f'ing metric system (Score 2, Interesting) 472

by johndierks (#27256791) Attached to: The 100 Degree Data Center

Farenheight has no basis in anything practical at *any* range. At least Celsius is based around water, which is useful for a number of reasons.

That's not quite true, 0*F to 100*F is pretty much the range humans can survive in without any kind of crazy technology. Makes sense to me.

Comment: Re:They just don't care. (Score 4, Insightful) 963

by johndierks (#24637361) Attached to: Why Is Adobe Flash On Linux Still Broken?
I'm a flash developer and I'll be the first to admit that the format has some major drawbacks.

The parent is correct though, there are no viable alternatives to the format. Nothing I know of provides the kinds of experience that flash is capable is. (see this site) Advertising drives the consumer side of the web and advertisers aren't going to move to less interactive or more static mediums. It also doesn't hurt that flash has a 99% penetration.

If there was a better platform with good penetration, while maintaining the ability to build rich interactivity, I'd be the first to jump.
Music

+ - Jury awards RIAA $222,000 piracy case->

Submitted by johndierks
johndierks (784521) writes "Jammie Thomas, a single mother of two, was found liable Thursday for copyright infringement in the nation's first file-sharing case to go before a jury. Twelve jurors here said the Minnesota woman must pay $9,250 for each of 24 shared songs that were the subject of the lawsuit, amounting to $222,000 in penalties. They could have dinged her for up to $3.6 million in damages, or awarded as little as $18,000. She was found liable for infringing songs from bands such as Journey, Green Day, AFI, Aerosmith and others. After the verdict was read, Thomas and her attorney left the courthouse without comment. The jurors also declined to talk to reporters."
Link to Original Source
Music

Universal Refuses To Renew On iTunes 287

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the don't-be-greedy dept.
UnknowingFool writes "It appears for the moment that Universal will not renew its long term contract with Apple for content on the iTunes store. While the details are not known about the exact nature of the dispute, many speculate that it has to do with Apple's stance on fixed pricing and Apple's refusal to license their DRM. The worse case scenario may include Universal pulling its entire catalog from iTunes. Both sides stand to lose out with 1/3 of of new releases coming from Universal and an estimated 15% of Universal's sales coming from digital downloads. Apple's market share is about 75% of digital downloads, and digital downloads are growing while CD sales are shrinking."
Music

+ - Universal choses to not renew iTunes contract->

Submitted by John
John (784521) writes ""The Universal Music Group of Vivendi, the world's biggest music corporation, last week notified Apple that it will not renew its annual contract to sell music through iTunes.... Instead, Universal said that it would market music to Apple at will, a move that could allow Universal to remove its songs from the iTunes service on short notice if the two sides do not agree on pricing or other terms in the future, these executives said."

Seems like a game of chicken. Who will flinch first, the world's largest music label or the world's third largest music retailer?"

Link to Original Source
Google

Google Wins Nude Thumbnail Legal Battle 204

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the over-for-now dept.
eldavojohn writes "Google is currently fighting many fronts in its ability to show small images returned in a search from websites. Most recently, Google won the case against them in which they were displaying nude thumbnails of a photographer's work from his site. Prior to this, Google was barred from displaying copyrighted content, even when linking it to the site (owner) from its search results. The verdict: "Saying the District Court erred, the San Francisco-based appeals court ruled that Google could legally display those images under the fair use doctrine of copyright law." This sets a rather hefty precedence in a search engine's ability to blindly serve content safely under fair use."
The Courts

RIAA Backs Down Again in Chicago 126

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the can't-win-them-all dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "The RIAA seems to have a problem making things stick in the Windy City. It has once again backed down in BMG v. Thao, after suing a misidentified defendant. Same thing occurred last October in Elektra v. Wilke. In the Thao case, the RIAA based its case on information that the cable modem used to partake in file sharing was registered to Mr. Thao. However, it turned out that Mr. Thao was not even a subscriber (pdf) of the ISP (pdf) at the time of the alleged file-sharing, and therefore did not have possession of the suspect cable modem at that time."
Announcements

+ - Patent Reform Legislation Hits The U.S. Congress

Submitted by mrneutron2004
mrneutron2004 (1003975) writes "Finally, someone on Capital Hill woke up and noticed how utterly absurd modern patent law. Abuse of patent law has spiraled out of control in the digital age, with many companies being taken to the cleaners for significantly huge sums over what we feel are extremely vague patents. Two congressmen from both parties have begun forcing through legislation to significantly cap patent infringement awards. Let's hope that alongside this potentially positive development, the U.S. Judiciary will get involved in self-education. As large an issue is a judiciary that fundamentally doesn't understand technology, and the absurdly vague patents and suits thereof that cycle through our legal system. http://www.fastsilicon.com/latest-news/patent-refo rm-legislation-hits-the-u.s.-congress.html?Itemid= 60"
Businesses

+ - TurboTax Meltdown on Tax Day

Submitted by sfjoe
sfjoe (470510) writes "Intuit says as many as 100,000 users of TurboTax may have had their IRS filings delayed due to server overload. A story in the San Francisco Chronicle says, "Intuit blamed the problem on an unexpected increase in e-filing, which overloaded its computer system". Intuit has gotten the IRS to give e-filers a break. On the TurboTax site, they say, "Intuit customers using TurboTax software to electronically file their U.S. federal income taxes won't be penalized as long as they e-file their returns by midnight April 19th"."
Microsoft

Microsoft WGA Phones Home Even When Told No 403

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the huge-shocker-here dept.
Aviran writes "When you start WGA setup and get to the license agreement page but decided NOT to install the highly controversial WGA component and cancel the installation, the setup program will send information stored in your registry and the fact that you choose not to install WGA back to Microsoft's servers."
Privacy

The Pentagon Wants a 'TiVo' to Watch You 256

Posted by Zonk
from the i-think-the-shulmans-are-particularly-funny-this-week dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Danger Room, a Wired blog, today cites a study of future electronic snooping technologies from Reuters, written by the Pentagon's Defense Science Board. More than anything, it seems these outside advisers want a surveillance system that would put Big Brother to shame, and they're looking at the commercial sector to provide it. 'The ability to record terabyte and larger databases will provide an omnipresent knowledge of the present and the past that can be used to rewind battle space observations in TiVo-like fashion and to run recorded time backwards to help identify and locate even low-level enemy forces. For example, after a car bomb detonates, one would have the ability to play high-resolution data backward in time to follows the vehicle back to the source, and then use that knowledge to focus collection and gain additional information by organizing and searching through archived data.'"
Microsoft

Microsoft Charging Businesses $4K for DST Fix 395

Posted by Zonk
from the pricey-way-to-tell-time dept.
eldavojohn writes "Microsoft has slashed the price it's going to charge users on the daylight saving time fixes. As you know, the federal law that moves the date for DST goes into effect this month. Although the price of $4000 is 1/10 of the original estimate Microsoft made, it seems a bit pricey for a patch to a product you've already paid for. From the article: 'Among the titles in that extended support category are Windows 2000, Exchange Server 2000 and Outlook 2000, the e-mail and calendar client included with Office 2000. For users running that software, Microsoft charges $4,000 per product for DST fixes. For that amount, customers can apply the patches to all systems in their organizations, including branch offices and affiliate.' The only thing they can't do, said a Microsoft rep, is redistribute them."

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