Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Yes, and to take it further (Score 1) 1183

by john-da-luthrun (#24317209) Attached to: World's Oldest Bible Going Online

Just FYI, Christians are well aware that resurrection from the dead goes against the second law of thermodynamics. That's why it's called a "miracle".

To put it another way: the 2nd law is concerned with closed systems, but the Christian claim is precisely that the resurrection represented an intervention from outside the system. Hence no breach of the second law.

Intel

+ - Major blow for OLPC->

Submitted by carvell
carvell (764574) writes "According to reports, it looks like Intel have pulled out of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project, citing "philosophical" differences as the reason. Back in May 2007 the OLPC founder, Nicholas Negroponte said that Intel should be ashamed of themselves, as they had planned a "rival" "classmate" laptop, intended to drive out the OLPC competition. Could this latest development be related to the classmate at all? Although OLPC appear to be using AMD processors, surely the loss of a major company backing the project will have repercussions for the OLPC project as a whole."
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Do Not Call Registry gets wake-up call-> 2

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "If you signed up for the federal or your state's Do Not Call Registry a few years ago, you might want to thing about refreshing it. Pennsylvanians this week got a wake up call, so to speak from the state's Attorney General Tom Corbett who kicked off a public awareness campaign designed to remind people what many have forgotten or never knew — that the 2002 law set registrations to expire after five years. That is of course unless you want to start hearing from those telemarketers as you sit down to dinner. Corbett said about 2 million people signed up in the immediate aftermath of the law taking effect and those who do not act by Sept. 15 will have their numbers dropped from the registry on Nov. 1. The Pennsylvania action is a reminder that the National Do Not Call Registry has a five year life span as well. The Federal Trade Commission is set to being a nation campaign in Spring 2008 to remind all US citizens to refresh their federal Do Not Call Registry standing. http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/18066"
Link to Original Source
Music

+ - Apple's Steve Jobs proposes scrapping DRM on music

Submitted by
chucken
chucken writes "Steve Jobs is proposing a shake-up of the on-line music business. From the BBC news article:

[Jobs] said the abolition of copy protection software known as digital rights management (DRM) would be good for consumers and music suppliers. Copyright protection had failed to tackle piracy, he argued. The firm behind the iPod has been under pressure to make its iTunes music store compatible with other music players.
"
Windows

+ - Bill Gates lays down the guantlet

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "In an interview on MSNBC, Bill Gates said

I mean, it's fascinating, maybe we shouldn't have showed so publicly the stuff we were doing, because we knew how long the new security base was going to take us to get done. Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine.


Sure sounds like a challenge to me. Will he rue the day he spoke those workds? How long until the first Vista exploit?"
Microsoft

+ - ODF plugin for Microsoft Word released

Submitted by Sputnikmeister
Sputnikmeister (1057062) writes "Just as Microsoft Office 2007 hits the retail shelves, the Open XML Translater plugin allowing Microsoft Word 2007 to work with documents created by OpenOffice has been released. It's a big concession by Microsoft to the open standards movement and a major boost for OpenOffice's efforts to break into the workplace."
Power

+ - British PM's PC hacked...

Submitted by
Xemu
Xemu writes "British Prime Minister Tony Blair's computers have been "hacked" by London law enforcement to find evidence of party political corruption. The police "hacked" the PCs because they were deeply frustrated by the "very slim" pile of documents that they received after it twice asked the administration for all emails, letters and other material relating to the system of awarding seats in Britain's unelected upper chamber of parliament, the House of Lords, in return for financial support."

: is not an identifier

Working...