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Comment: Some classics (Score 1) 247

by jnorden (#46837295) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Books for a Comp Sci Graduate Student?

If by "computer science" you mean "programming", then Knuth's series is indispensable, and an excellent addition would be Aho, Hopcroft, and Ullman's "Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms".

On the other hand, if by "computer science" you mean the branch of mathematics that goes by this name, the best text I know if is Machtey & Young's "Introduction to the general theory of algorithms". Sadly, this book is out of print (few people use use this meaning of "computer science" any more), but right now there are used copies available at amazon. Another excellent book in this category would be Garey & Johnson's "Computers and Intractability: A Guide to the Theory of NP-Completeness". A final text worth looking at is Michael Sipser's "Introduction to the Theory of Computation" (you can save some $$ by purchasing one of the older editions).

+ - Once Slashdot beta has been foisted upon me, what site should I use instead? 2

Submitted by somenickname
somenickname (1270442) writes "As a long time Slashdot reader, I'm wondering what website to transition to once the beta goes live. The new beta interface seems very well suited to tablets/phones but, it ignores the fact that the user base is, as one would expect, nerds sitting in front of very large LCD monitors and wasting their employers time. It's entirely possible that the browser ID information gathered by the site has indicated that they get far more hits on mobile devices where the new interface is reasonable but, I feel that no one has analyzed the browser ID (and screen resolution) against comments modded +5. I think you will find that most +5 comments are coming from devices (real fucking computers) that the new interface does not support well. Without an interface that invites the kind of users that post +5 comments, Slashdot is just a ho-hum news aggregation site that allows comments. So, my question is, once the beta is the default, where should Slashdot users go to?"

+ - Slashdot beta sucks 9

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Maybe some of the slashdot team should start listening to its users, most of which hate the new user interface. Thanks for ruining something that wasn't broken."

Comment: Follow up to Angell article (Score 1) 542

by jnorden (#36791080) Attached to: Mass Psychosis In the USA?

The NYT piece by Marcia Angell is excellent, really worth reading all the way through. The second part of her article can be found here:
here.

I found the most infuriating bit of information to be that Irving Kirsch had to use the freedom of information act to get the FDA to release all of the study data it had on the antidepressants he analyzed. I assume he succeeded because the patents had expired, so the FDA was no longer able to treat the data as "proprietary". It is really criminal that drug companies aren't forced to release all the information that they've collected about a drug once it is approved.

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Man Wants to Donate His Heart Before He Dies 456

Posted by samzenpus
from the cart-before-the-horse dept.
Gary Phebus wants to donate his heart, lungs, and liver. The problem is he wants to donate them before he dies. Gary was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease, in 2008. Phebus says he'd like to be able to donate his organs before they deteriorate, and doesn't consider his request suicide because he's "dead anyway."
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Massive EU Program To Study Three-legged Dogs 85

Posted by samzenpus
from the all-I-really-need-to-know-I-learned-from-a-three-legged-dog dept.
DMandPenfold writes "A multi-billion dollar European Union IT research fund will help study the behavior of three-legged dogs, it has been revealed. The fund will support extensive studies into how three-legged dogs move. There is a particular focus on how the dogs balance and function, given their missing limb."
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Measuring the Speed of Light With Valentine's Day Chocolate 126

Posted by samzenpus
from the speed-of-the-sound-of-loneliness dept.
Cytotoxic writes "What to do with all of those leftover Valentine's Day chocolates? — a common problem for the Slashdot crowd. The folks over at Wired magazine have an answer for you in a nice article showing how to measure the speed of light with a microwave and some chocolate. A simple yet surprisingly accurate method that can be used to introduce the scientific method to children and others in need of a scientific education."

The reason that every major university maintains a department of mathematics is that it's cheaper than institutionalizing all those people.

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