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Comment: Re:And this is why there's traffic... (Score 1) 596

by garcia (#48604087) Attached to: Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

Clearly you have never been to the UCLA campus because, if you had, you would have known this isn't true in the least. You can walk all over that place.

The problem in LA is the culture. People believe they are to be seen in their automobiles and they buy or lease expensive cars and drive them ridiculously short distances for that sole reason (if there is another reason, please do share but nothing really makes sense).

I worked for a company based out of LA for 2.5 years and we were there often. One guy lived a 10 minute walk from the office but chose to drive each and every day. He didn't buy an M3 to have it sit in his garage, after all. Nope, it sat in the company's garage instead.

SMH.

Comment: The Click is Dead Anyway (Score 1) 285

by garcia (#48555271) Attached to: AdNauseam Browser Extension Quietly Clicks On Blocked Ads

I work in marketing analytics and, specifically, in measuring the effectiveness of online marketing campaigns at a customer level. Straight up click tracking is dead and this will do nothing which is purports as organizations begin moving away from siloed measurement of IMP -> CLK within single channels at an aggregate level and instead go down to the very granular cross-channel customer-level attribution.

If you really want to avoid detection and behavior tracking, I highly suggest you entirely disable cookies entirely (yes, I realize this is not worth it at all), otherwise you will not have accomplished what you had hoped.

Comment: Re:Very sad (Score 1) 277

by garcia (#47974409) Attached to: Phablet Reviews: Before and After the iPhone 6

For the first time since I started w/the iPhone (the 3G was my first one), I see absolutely nothing of value with this major release version which makes me want to upgrade to it.

I'll be paying $99 for the 5S and be happy w/it. Sorry but unnecessarily bigger sizes and a better camera is not worth $200+contract renewal.

Comment: Re:Your employer (Score 4, Insightful) 182

by garcia (#47965099) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who Should Pay Costs To Attend Conferences?

The IT world is certainly competitive; however, ALL companies should see the internal benefits to training employees and working to ensure they do not leave. Companies with the mindset you laid out above are doing themselves a double disservice by not training their employees and leveraging the benefits and immediate returns provided by investments in their human capital. In some fields and with some resources, professional development is seen as a bigger happiness motivator and retention tool than more salary.

What you have outlined above is a company which is not interested in its people and only its immediate bottom line and one where it's clear its people should move on regardless of payscale and internal short-term opportunity provided.

Comment: Conference Attendance and Funding (Score 2) 182

by garcia (#47965007) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Who Should Pay Costs To Attend Conferences?

As someone who has repeatedly attended and presented at conferences in my field, I make it a point during negotiations for any new job to ensure these are funded fully but only if I am presenting; otherwise, I opt to share in the costs associated in attending with my employer.

Each and every company I have worked at in the past (and current) has a budget for training and professional development of its employees, some more than others; however, by making a case that I am giving back to a community of like-minded professionals and putting our name and brand out there during presentations, I have found this is an easy sell for companies for which I want to work.

I work extensively w/SAS and utilize a lot of the conference (SAS Global Forum/SUGI prior) materials in my day to day both for myself and our entire organization. By making it clear to my employers that I want to give back by presenting, I have opened organization's view on how the sharing of information benefits the business while benefiting the entire industry.

Make your determination and desires known when you sign on and, if that is not an option, make it clear to your management that you want to do the same thing. While I have received a variety of different types of pushback over the years for this view, they have all relented and ended up changing their world view when the benefits are presented as they are.

Conferences are not inexpensive (SAS Global Forum is usually around $3000 - $3500 for a single person encompassing travel, conference registration, lodging, meals, etc) but the ROI can be HUGE beyond that depending on the knowledge transfers that occur, the networking opportunities, and the new business development which I have seen from these conferences.

While I did not attend SASGF 2014 this year, it was solely due to my available time to develop a presentation topic, not because my company would not send me (this was my first missed attendance since I became involved in the SAS world) and I look forward to contributing to and learning from others in the future.

Best of luck.

Comment: Re:As a Sr. Analytics Manager... (Score 1) 466

by garcia (#46996207) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Minimum Programming Competence In Order To Get a Job?

For many reasons including:

There aren't many places that do not have Office installed. People are very familiar with it and even if they aren't, they can usually make their way around it in with only a little coaching.

Most companies use Excel for basic analysis, charting, and data delivery to non-technical report recipients.

Deliver a raw dataset and allow the end-user to pivot, chart, etc. It takes the strain off the analytics team for basic tasks and gives the end user the power to do what they want with the data. Tableau seat licenses aren't realistic for most companies and building some sort of analytics platform from scratch in your language of choice isn't always something you can do in the short term and provide more functionality with less training required.

I could go on, but that gives you a general idea.

Comment: Re:As a Sr. Analytics Manager... (Score 1) 466

by garcia (#46990195) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Minimum Programming Competence In Order To Get a Job?

In the work my team is responsible for, I look for culture fit above anything else. I took a guy with some internship work during his graduate schooling and turned him into what I consider a stellar programmer/analyst.

I'd concentrate on your programming skill and your business knowledge, if any. A lot of organizations are looking for report jockeys and/or true analysts and in that case, highlight your visualization and analysis ability first, programming second. What sort of experience did you have during your schooling that you believe makes you a good fit for an analytics role today?

We have sponsored before, but we/I prefer to hire those who don't require it first.

Comment: As a Sr. Analytics Manager... (Score 2) 466

by garcia (#46989873) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Minimum Programming Competence In Order To Get a Job?

What I like to see are the following:

1. Statistics knowledge

2. Excel (pivots, charting, VBA, etc.)

3. SAS/R/SPSS (in order).

4. Unix shell scripting.

5. Some sort of data visualization tool usage (e.g. Tableu)

---

We are currently looking for analysts and the market is tough. We take people from all walks: CS, social sciences, Stats/Math/Econ/Finance, etc. The Analytics market is continually growing and in desperate need of people who are competent until higher education catches up and starts putting people out with a good mix of CS, Stats, and Business knowledge.

Get into Analytics IMO, the pay is great and the work is pretty fun.

Comment: Re:Time for a union that is only way to get the po (Score 1) 215

by garcia (#46979439) Attached to: Plaintiff In Tech Hiring Suit Asks Judge To Reject Settlement

I had a grievance filed against me for "not doing enough work" because my desk was...wait for it...too clean.

Yes, I had to go through 5 weeks of 3-5 FTEs spending several hours each week discussing the fact that someone claimed I was not busy enough because my desk was neat and tidy.

Want to know it was resolved? They came and looked at my desk and then we went to their office and looked at their desk (a fucking disaster area) and then it was dropped.

FTEs = Me, my union rep, the individual filing the grievance, their union rep, and an arbitrator. For 5 fucking weeks.

Unions are horseshit.

Comment: Re:What a joke (Score 4, Insightful) 195

by garcia (#46700835) Attached to: Comcast Takes 2014 Prize For Worst Company In America

Then why aren't you buying your own modem for less than $50 and saving yourself the money every month? I mean, I get it, I think Comcast is for the birds too but honestly bitching about something you can buy yourself and they'll absolutely allow you to take on all the risk for is not something to choose to complain about.

Comment: Better chances if you do not have one? (Score 2, Interesting) 343

by garcia (#45475223) Attached to: Elon Musk Talks About the Importance of Physics, Criticizes the MBA

As a one-time worker bee who is now a part of senior management (with an MPA and not an MBA, although they are pretty similar) I understand what he is saying but I disagree that people should have a better chance of being hired because they have the three letters next to their name.

I hire for open reqs based on the PERSON and their SKILLSET, not the degree they may or may not hold. You know, the way it should be. What Musk is promoting through another one of his ridiculous soundbites is that we should pay more attention to degrees (good or bad) than the skills someone brings along with them.

Musk can be absolutely brilliant and incredibly and insanely stupid all at the same time.

Computers are useless. They can only give you answers. -- Pablo Picasso

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