Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re: Or so they say... (Score 1, Flamebait) 142

by jmcvetta (#47855353) Attached to: Feds Say NSA "Bogeyman" Did Not Find Silk Road's Servers

Yes, that's a good little Centrist - lick that boot. No one could possibly have an experience with the legal apparatus that contradicts the fairy tales you were taught in high school Civics class...

Regardless of your baseless opinion on why I was removed, the fact is at least 11 of 12 original jurors were removed. The attorneys cycled thru something like 18 of the 30-ish potential jurors by the time I was excluded. Jury selection continued after I left.

It's pretty obvious juries in my city are not juries of the defendants' peers, but rather juries of select persons favored by attorneys.

Comment: Re: Or so they say... (Score 1) 142

by jmcvetta (#47855171) Attached to: Feds Say NSA "Bogeyman" Did Not Find Silk Road's Servers

When I was called for jury duty (in California), the attorneys had something like 10 peremptory challenges each. Everyone who wasn't a slack-jawed dimwit was removed. This was only for a traffic accident case - I imagine the lawful-corruption would be even worse in a more serious case.

In Centrist America, it's only a jury of your "peers" if you ride the short bus.

Comment: Re:Is Coding Computer Science? Of Course! (Score 5, Insightful) 546

by jmcvetta (#47820741) Attached to: Does Learning To Code Outweigh a Degree In Computer Science?

The best-run company I ever worked with took what I thought was a sensible approach to optimization:

We were working on a complicated production system with hundreds of individual components and intense uptime requirements. The vast majority of the programmers (about 1000) were to focus on writing "robust" code that worked in an "obvious", easy-to-maintain way. The Performance Engineering team would look at system metrics (everything was instrumented) to find the actual performance bottlenecks. Then they would send in a crack team of commando programmers to do trippy, non-obvious optimizations on very small pieces of code.

The idea was, in a complicated system it's very unlikely that your specific piece of code is going to be the limiting factor in overall system performance. So it's better to have less performance-optimal but more robust code in most places; and to use fast but brittle code only where absolutely necessary.

FWIW, the company in question is outlandishly profitable, and their software is widely considered the best in their industry.

Comment: Re:Yes and no. (Score 1) 546

by jmcvetta (#47819819) Attached to: Does Learning To Code Outweigh a Degree In Computer Science?

Buildings large & complex enough to require a structural engineer generally aren't built by carpenters. Afaik (I don't work in construction) for large steel frame or ferroconcrete building there is role equivalent to the master carpenter on a wooden project - a single person who in theory could build the entire building by himself.

Comment: Re:Programmer or Engineer? (Score 1) 546

by jmcvetta (#47819537) Attached to: Does Learning To Code Outweigh a Degree In Computer Science?

An Engineer Designs. Which do you want to be? The theory that CS teaches is mostly and directly translatable to Software Engineering.

The considerably majority - tho by no means all - of the CS majors I have worked with couldn't design a clean, elegant API if their job depended on it. Alas, it never does.

Comment: Re:False premise (Score 1) 546

by jmcvetta (#47819441) Attached to: Does Learning To Code Outweigh a Degree In Computer Science?

Without a degree you will find nearly impossible to get past HR gatekeepers.

Depends where you are. In my experience, what you say is very true on the East Coast. However in California it's not true at all, and I think out here not having a CS degree might even be a slight advantage.

Remember: Silly is a state of Mind, Stupid is a way of Life. -- Dave Butler

Working...