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Submission + - Justice Department Slaps IBM Over H-1B Hiring Practices 1

Dawn Kawamoto writes: IBM reached a settlement with the Justice Department over allegations it posted discriminatory online job openings, allegedly stating a preference for H-1B and foreign student visa holders for its software and apps developer positions. The job openings were for IT positions that would eventually require the applicant to relocate overseas. IBM agreed to pay $44,400 in civil penalties to the U.S., as well take certain actions in the way it hires within the U.S. The settlement, announced Friday, comes at a time with tech companies are calling for the U.S. to allow more H-1B workers into the country.

Submission + - AMD and DICE Bring Low-Level, High-Performance Graphics API To PCs With "Mantle" (

MojoKid writes: In addition to unveiling a new family of GPUs this week, AMD has also announced Mantle, a “low-level high-performance console-style” graphics API for the PC. Mantle will ostensibly allow developers to work “closer to the metal”, like they do with console GPUs. As it turns out, it's AMD GPUs that will be powering all next generation consoles, so the whole concept flows out of AMD’s experience with both consoles and PCs. AMD’s angle is that PC graphics present several challenges that hamstring both performance and programmability. For instance, you have to support a huge range of hardware, from the slowest to the fastest platforms out there, and the GPU has to be fed workload by the CPU, limiting the full power of a modern GPU in some cases. Essentially, AMD feels that devs can get more performance out of GPUs and tap into their real capabilities better with Mantle. AMD has already partnered with DICE to co-develop Mantle and EA's Frostbite 3 engine will render natively with Mantle as well as make use of standard DX11 rendering on Radeon GPUs.

Submission + - Ooops...They were wrong

jmccay writes: Apparently, Al Gore was wrong. The science behind global warming is not settled. All the past models and results can now be thrown out the window. Summarised here. The computer models apparently were not set up properly with the correct data. Here is a better description.

Linus Torvalds For Nobel Peace Prize? 541

An anonymous reader writes "I'm as much of a Linux fanboy as anyone else, but I've never thought of anything in computing as being worth a Nobel Peace Prize. Apparently, there are those who take global collaboration seriously, though..." The suggestion has been bouncing around the Portland Linux community, where Torvalds lives. Is it worthy of wider attention and discussion?

GNOME 3 Delayed Until September 2010 419

supersloshy writes "Contrary to popular opinion, GNOME 3 will not be released in March next year. It has been delayed until September 2010, six months later. According to the news message, this is because 'our community wants GNOME 3.0 to be fully working for users and why we believe September is more appropriate.' GNOME 3's main goal is to re-define the ways people interact with the desktop, mainly through a new UI design (currently called 'GNOME Shell'), while GNOME 2.30, set for release in March, will have a focus on being stable. An early visual tour of GNOME 3 has been posted at Digitizor."

Microsoft Buys Teamprise, Will Ship Linux Tools 200

spongman writes "Microsoft's Senior Vice President, Developer Division, S. Somasegar has announced that Microsoft has acquired Teamprise from Sourcegear, LLC, and will be shipping it as part of the upcoming Visual Studio 2010 release. Teamprise is an Eclipse plugin (and related tools) for connecting to Team Foundation Server, Microsoft's source-control/project-management system. What's most interesting about this is not only that Microsoft has realized that heterogeneous development platforms are important to their developer customers, but the fact that Microsoft themselves will now be developing and shipping products based on those heterogeneous platforms, including 5 versions of Unix."

The Inexact Science of Carbon Neutrality 302

snydeq writes "Sustainable IT's Ted Samson raises questions regarding the purchasing of carbon offsets, a practice growing in popularity among tech companies such as Dell, Yahoo, and Google in an attempt to achieve 'carbon neutrality.' Essentially financial instruments, carbon offsets enable companies to invest money in sustainable endeavors in an attempt to counteract the carbon footprint they incur conducting their business. But as a recent article in the Wall Street Journal shows, measuring the value of these carbon offsets is tricky business, as some recipients of offsets say the results of their sustainable efforts would be achieved regardless of any one company's investment. 'The question of whether carbon offsets hold value just scratches the surface of the overall carbon-neutrality question,' Samson writes. 'For the time being, there isn't even a consistent approach to measuring an organization's carbon footprint in the first place. And if you don't know how much CO2 you're responsible for, how do you know how much offsetting is necessary to become neutral?'"

Submission + - Astronomers find planet collision (

thered2001 writes: From the article:

"It's as if Earth and Venus collided with each other," said Benjamin Zuckerman, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and a co-author on the paper. "Astronomers have never seen anything like this before; apparently major, catastrophic, collisions can take place in a fully mature planetary system."

"If any life was present on either planet, the massive collision would have wiped out everything in a matter of minutes: the ultimate extinction event," said coauthor Gregory Henry, an astronomer at Tennessee State University. "A massive disk of infrared-emitting dust circling the star provides silent testimony to this sad fate," said Henry.


Homeland Security Department Testing "Pre-Crime" Detector 580

holy_calamity writes "New Scientist reports that the Department of Homeland Security recently tested something called Future Attribute Screening Technologies (FAST) — a battery of sensors that determine whether someone is a security threat from a distance. Sensors look at facial expressions, body heat and can measure pulse and breathing rate from a distance. In trials using 140 volunteers those told to act suspicious were detected with 'about 78% accuracy on mal-intent detection, and 80% on deception,' says a DHS spokesman."

Submission + - Forget iPhone, the Gphone is here (

gambit3 writes: "Google, the nearly $13.5 billion search engine major, is believed to be a fortnight away from the worldwide launch of its much-awaited Google Phone (Gphone) and has started talks with service providers in India for an exclusive launch on one of their networks. One big obstacle to the gPhone: the name has already been applied for as a trademark, and not by Google. Micro-g LaCoste, Inc., a company in Lafayette, Colorado, applied back on March 5 for a gPhone trademark, according to"

Feed Science Daily: Social Parasites Of The Smaller Kind (

Cooperation is widespread in the natural world but so too are cheats -- mutants that reap the benefits of others' cooperative efforts. In evolutionary terms, cheats should prosper, so how cooperation persists is puzzling. New research reveals that some cheats orchestrate their own downfall. The pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa cooperates to scavenge iron, but cheats steal the iron supplies. Cultures with fewer cheats thrived, to the benefit of the few cheats. Cultures with many cheats grew poorly.
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Making a inertial navigation system?

An anonymous reader writes: Hi guys, I am interested in making an inertial navigation system using the now common embedded accelerometers. The problem is, I can't find any specs on what the sensitivity or accuracy of those sensors are. What kind of accuracy should I expect out of one of the laptop embedded accelerometers, and how much out of one of the embedded systems like Gumstix that cost a few hundred dollars? I will probably be using it in a car, if you need to know the operating enviroment. Horizontal X and Y axis required, vertical axis optional.

Submission + - Gamma Ray Anomaly Could Test String Theory (

exploder writes: String theory is notorious for its lack of testable predictions. But if the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope team's interpretation is correct, then a delay in the arrival of higher-energy gamma rays could point to a breakdown of relativity theory. A type of "quantum lensing effect" is postulated to cause the delay, which is approximateley four minutes over a half-billion year journey.

A committee is a group that keeps the minutes and loses hours. -- Milton Berle