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Graphics

+ - Linux based OpenGL development system without X

Submitted by
zelko
zelko writes "myOS — Linux based OpenGL development system without X Minimalistic GNU/Linux system, stripped down of everything, but core necessary files to compile and run OpenGL/C code. It has simplified directory structure and cleaned up internal cross referencing. Programs compiled in myOS will run on any Linux with or without X. Copy of the OpenGL Red Book is included, together with 45 examples from the book. Examples are organized by chapters, each in separate folder, ready to compile, run and play with. Source code is modified to use Scitech drivers and is very similar to GLUT version in the Red Book. This little collection is really all one needs to learn OpenGL. In fact the whole system being very simple to use or analyze and understand, can be a tool to teach Linux basics and C/OpenGL programming. http://one.xthost.info/zelko/opengl.html"
Censorship

+ - Is your website banned in China?

Submitted by
tcd004
tcd004 writes "Is your site banned in China? FP Passport recently profiled a new online service, Greatfirewallofchina.org, which tests any website from a server based inside the Middle Kingdom, and reports back whether or not the page is available. Passport also notes that the Great Firewall reveals Chinese censorship whittles down websites to block out individual pages, instead of always applying a site-wide block. The site keeps a running log of each test so Censorship trends over time can be easily tracked."
Programming

+ - Swing Bling - Java effects comparable to Flash

Submitted by Nemi
Nemi (627009) writes "From the article — "But the one thing that Swing still lacks is eye candy. Swishy, bouncy, scrolly stuff. Now personally I can't stand it... But the Flex demo got me wondering: just how easy would it be to add swishy, bouncy, scrolly stuff to a standard Swing GUI?"

This is a very simple demo, but shows what is possible with Java/Swing. Now that Java is open sourced, may we be seeing more of this become available?"
Businesses

+ - Comparison of Working at the 3 Big Software Giants

Submitted by
castironwok
castironwok writes "Finally, everything you've ever wanted to know about being an employee at Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo. Tastyresearch describes his (or her) past few years interning and working at the three companies. Things I didn't know from before: Bill Gates wears old shoes, Google's internal security watches you like a hawk, the office styles of each company, and how to fill your suitcase with Google T-shirts. He calls the few select companies the 'prestigious internship circle', noting "once you have worked at one, it's a lot easier to get into another". But what *I* really want to know now, is who has a more equal male-female ratio?"
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Amazing Cancer Drug Found; Scientist Annoyed.

Submitted by
sporkme
sporkme writes "A scientist was frustrated when the compound she was working with destroyed her sample of cancer cells. Further research revealed that the substance was surprisingly well suited as a cancer treatment. From the article:

"I made a calculation error and used a lot more than I should have. And my cells died," Schaefer said. A colleague overheard her complaining. "The co-author on my paper said,' Did I hear you say you killed some cancer?' I said 'Oh', and took a closer look." They ran several tests and found the compound killed "pretty much every epithelial tumor cell lines we have seen."
Lab test results on hapless mice have resulted in the destruction of colon tumors without making the mice sick. The PPAR-gamma compound is expected to be especially useful in combating treatment-resistant types of cancer."
Programming

+ - Employer Ratings for Coders, by Coders

Submitted by
witten
witten writes "Coderific is new site for software developers where you can actually write reviews of your employers. The scores for the reviews are totaled up, and lists are generated for the best employers and the worst employers. Additionally you can look up employers based on geographical area, so the next time you're moving to a new area you can find out about the best companies to work for. There currently aren't very many entries on certain employers, but some do have enough reviews to give you a good idea of problems to look for."
Movies

+ - The Top 12 Movies that Were Ahead of Their Time

Submitted by
Alex Billington
Alex Billington writes "What makes a movie years down the road be referred to as ahead of its time? It's the visual effects and technical achievements that the filmmakers implemented, from the miniatures in Star Wars to the time-freezing camera system in The Matrix, these movies were vastly ahead of their time. FirstShowing.net has comprised a comprehensive list of the top 12 movies in history that were ahead of their time, ranging from Psycho and 2001 to The Matrix."
Businesses

+ - I am the bad boss!! what now?!?

Submitted by Anonymous
Anonymous (666) writes "I'm an IT manager since almost 2 years now and out of no-where (maybe arrogance), I decided to do a 360 feedback (using one of those websites). Employees were able to answer anonymously and, now I'm sure, didn't hold on anything on their mind. Turned out I'm not very good; pretty much very bad. As suggested, I'm one of those managers who got promoted due to "technical prowess" in my previous position. And in all honesty, although I like the job (well, before I did...), I didn't sign up for this (people who hates you and goes bad mouthing about you — not that they're not right, just that I don't want to be known like that). What should I do now? You guys saw anyone in that same position (maybe you?) and actually turned it over and became a good boss?"
Google

+ - Turns Out Google Really Does Listen

Submitted by
SamThomp
SamThomp writes "There's a perfect Google underdog story going on right now. It goes like this: A college student named Aaron Stanton has an idea he thinks Google will love. He tries to get in touch via phone, e-mail, and their web forms with no luck. Then, spurred by his father nearly dying of an embolism near Christmas, he takes a chance and flies to Mountain View, CA without an appointment, intending to sit in their lobby "like a spoiled child" until he gets a chance to meet with someone. He's been there about three days, now.

Here's where it gets interesting. He creates a website called CanGoogleHearMe.com, and uses Google Video to document his journey in hopes that it might be seen by someone at Google and they'll show pity. At first he's turned away (links to Google Video) at the door and doesn't get a chance to talk to anyone. Then, apparently someone in Google does notice the website and it spreads — word of mouth — inside of Google like wildfire; 600 people visit the site in two hours from inside of Google's headquarters at Mountain View.

Then, late last night — three days into his trip — the guy gets an e-mail with the subject line, "We can hear you :)" that says they're willing to listen to him. No meeting for sure yet, but a step in the right direction.

It's like "actual" reality TV. :) If you're looking for an interesting story to pay attention to for the week, it'll be interesting to see how this turns out. So far, Google seems to be living up to their image of being a large company that's open to ideas. As far as I'm concerned, best of luck to them both."
Announcements

+ - Truth in Video Game Rating Act Reintroduced

Submitted by
njkid1
njkid1 writes "The "Truth in Video Game Rating Act" was reintroduced today in the U.S. Senate. This move was spearheaded by Senator Sam Brownback who originally authored the bill in September 2006. The act would require the ESRB to assess all of a game's content before issuing a rating, rather than relying upon demonstrations provided by the developers and publishers. It would also prohibit the witholding of playable content from the ESRB. http://biz.gamedaily.com/industry/news/?id=15248&n cid=AOLGAM000500000000014"
Security

+ - 10 Signs an Employee is About to Go Bad

Submitted by ancientribe
ancientribe (1057834) writes "Tomorrow is the two-year anniversary of ChoicePoint 'fessing up to its credit-card data exposure fiasco. A Dark Reading article today gives 10 warning signs that an employee is about to flip on you or give away the company jewels or other sensitive information — and what to do about it.

http://www.darkreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=117 323&WT.svl=news1_1"
Privacy

+ - U.S. group wants Canada blacklisted over piracy

Submitted by Kaneda2112
Kaneda2112 (871795) writes "Again with the

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM .20070214.wblacklist14/BNStory/National/home

Canadian piracy thing! How can these groups continue to spread misinformation and FUD? It is so irritating for those of us up here! Micheal Geist has debunked this baloney (http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/1656/159/ ) "While the reports have succeeded in attracting considerable attention, a closer examination of the industry's own data reveals that the claims are based primarily on fiction rather than fact." Aarrgh!"
The Almighty Buck

+ - Amazon asserts right to adjust prices after sale

Submitted by An anonymous reader
An anonymous reader (666) writes "On December 23, Amazon advertised a "buy one get one free" sale on DVD boxsets, but did not test the promotion before going live. When anyone placed two boxsets in their cart, the website gave a double discount — so the "grand total" shown (before order submission) was $0.00 or something very small. Despite terms stating that Amazon checks order prices before shipping, Amazon shipped the vast majority of orders. Five days later (December 28), after orders had been received and presumably opened, Amazon emailed customers advising them to return the boxsets unopened or customers' credit cards would be charged an additional amount. (You can read more threads about this here and here.) Starting yesterday, Amazon has been (re)charging credit cards, often without authorization. On Amazon's side, they didn't advertise any double discount, and the free or nearly-free boxsets must have cost them a mint. But with Amazon continually giving unadvertised discounts that seem to be errors, is "return the merchandise or be charged" the new way that price glitches will be handled?"

Power corrupts. And atomic power corrupts atomically.

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