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Submission + - Being penalized by employer for Facebook entry 2

jkyrlach writes: A friend of mine recently got written up by his employer for posting the following comment on his/her Facebook page: "I'm either a really well paid technical support person or a really poorly paid Integration Engineer. Either way, my new motto is 'Have you tried turning it off and back on again?' (from The IT Crowd)." I don't understand how this type of penalization can be legal. This friend lives in OH. Any recommendation, especially those of you with legal expertise, on what my friend should do? Isn't this a violation of his/her freedom of speech?

Submission + - India to get new copy-right laws (medianama.com) 1

prayag writes: "India, is supposed to introduce a new copyright law. Despite opposition from broadcasters, the Indian government has approved the introduction of a bill to amend the Copyright Act of 1957 in a far-reaching step that will give artists and musicians protection, long overdue recognition and locus standi. According to the government's communique, the "Amendment is proposed to give independent rights to authors of literary and musical works in cinematograph films, which were hitherto denied and wrongfully exploited, by the producers and music companies."

The amendments are in line with international treaties such as the WIPO Copyright Treaty and WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty. Though India has not signed either treaty as yet, it is trying to align its laws with them."


Submission + - Privacy Issues Of Data Collecting (net-security.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Will 2010 see the beginning of a change in regulations regarding net privacy? It's hard to tell. The issue has been a matter for dispute for quite some time now, but there have been no significant steps toward dealing with it and the "enemy" is strong: money. The simple fact is that advertising is what makes free content possible. And, if we look at it from the marketers point of view, we can't but agree that they have to get something in return. But, looking at it from our common user perspective, we feel a little naked, a little vulnerable knowing that someone out there can use the gathered information to steer us towards choices we may wish we hadn't.

This restaurant was advertising breakfast any time. So I ordered french toast in the renaissance. - Steven Wright, comedian