Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Christmas Cheer

Which E-Commerce System Will Fail This Season? 63

Posted by Zonk
from the big-of-a-dire-prediction dept.
Esther Schindler writes "Every year, there's some retailer whose e-commerce or supply chain fails. And it's a big deal, since the holiday shopping season can make or break their year. The IT challenge encompasses everything from server scalability to supply chain management to search engine optimization to database cajoling to business integration to... well, come to think of it, just about everything. To explore this, CIO.com has a big package of articles examining "Black Friday" and its implications, entitled E-Commerce and Supply Chain Systems Gird for Black Friday. Topics covered include online shopping and holiday IT failures. Despite all this—and at least ten years of industry experience in e-commerce sales—we all just know that someone will make yet another big mistake. I wonder who it'll be this year?"
Google

Google Honors Veterans Day, Finally 693

Posted by kdawson
from the that-wasn't-so-hard-was-it dept.
theodp writes "It took nearly a decade, but Google has done a turnabout and is honoring Veterans Day with a special holiday design for its famous logo. Users who log onto Google's home page are greeted with three World War I-era helmets capping the letters 'o' and 'e' in Google's name. The decoration is a marked departure for the company, which has come under fire from veterans' groups for ignoring American holidays such as Veterans Day and Memorial Day since Google's inception in 1999."
Software

OpenDocument Foundation Closes 177

Posted by kdawson
from the to-bed-without-your-supper dept.
Munchkinguy writes "First, they dropped support for their namesake OpenDocument Format and declared a switch to the W3C's 'Compound Document Format.' Then, W3C's Chris Lilley clarified that CDF 'was not created to be, and isn't suitable for use as, an office format.' Now, the Foundation has mysteriously closed up shop, leaving the following message: 'The OpenDocument Foundation, Inc. is closed. We sincerely wish our friends and associates in the OpenDocument Community all the best and much success going forward. Good-bye and good luck.'"

Canadian ISP Co-Op Shows Upside of Line Sharing 85

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the grass-roots-muni-wifi dept.
Golden Gael writes "The FCC got rid of mandatory line sharing in the US a few years ago, but it's alive and kicking in Canada, and an interesting article at Ars Technica looks at what can happen when there's vibrant broadband competition. 'Wireless Nomad does things a little differently. The company is subscriber-owned, volunteer-run, and open-source friendly. It offers a neutral Internet connection with no bandwidth caps or throttling, and it makes a point of creating wireless access points at the end of each DSL connection that can be used, for free, by the public. Bell Canada this is not.' The ISP has some ambitious plans for the future, including getting involved in WiMAX."
Input Devices

Headband Gives Wearer "Sixth-Sense" 234

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the use-the-force dept.
An anonymous reader writes "New Scientist reports on a headband developed at the University of Tokyo that allows the wearer to feel their surroundings at a distance — as if they had cats whiskers. Infrared sensors positioned around the headband vibrate to signal when and where an object is close. There are also a few great videos of people using it to dodge stuff while blindfolded."
The Internet

The Smiley Face Turns 25 :-) 250

Posted by Zonk
from the heh dept.
klubar writes "Another milestone of online communications has been reached. The smiley turns 25, according to Carnegie Mellon University professor Scott E. Fahlman who says he was the first to use three keystrokes. 'Language experts say the smiley face and other emotional icons, known as emoticons, have given people a concise way in e-mail and other electronic messages of expressing sentiments that otherwise would be difficult to detect. Fahlman posted the emoticon in a message to an online electronic bulletin board at 11:44 a.m. on Sept. 19, 1982, during a discussion about the limits of online humor and how to denote comments meant to be taken lightly.'"
NASA

NASA Decides No Fix Needed for Endeavor's Tiles 209

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the damn-the-tiles-full-speed-ahead dept.
bhmit1 writes "It looks like NASA is reporting that no repairs are needed for Endeavor. 'After meeting for five hours, mission managers opted Thursday night against any risky spacewalk repairs, after receiving the results of one final thermal test. The massive amount of data indicated Endeavor would suffer no serious structural damage during next week's re-entry. Their worry was not that Endeavor might be destroyed and its seven astronauts killed in a replay of the Columbia disaster — the gouge is too small to be catastrophic. They were concerned that the heat of re-entry could weaken the shuttle's aluminum frame at the damaged spot and result in lengthy post-flight repairs.'"
Hardware

New Chip-cooling Technology 167

Posted by samzenpus
from the cool-off dept.
BillOfThePecosKind writes "Researchers have demonstrated a new technology using tiny "ionic wind engines" that might dramatically improve computer chip cooling, possibly addressing a looming threat to future advances in computers and electronics. Purdue researchers funded by Intel have improved the "heat-transfer coefficient" by some 250%. I never liked water cooled systems, and this sounds promising. However I wonder how much ozone one of these things produces."
Google

Google Rolls Out Online Storage Services 285

Posted by Zonk
from the instant-access-warez-stash dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The associated press reports that Google is slated to provide online storage at a price. From the article: 'Web search and Internet services company Google Inc. on Friday began selling expanded online storage, targeted for users with large picture, music or video file collections. The prices range from $20 per year for 6 gigabytes of online storage; $75 per year for 25 gigabytes of storage; $250 per year for 100 gigabytes of storage; and $500 per year for 250 gigabytes of storage.' Is this too expensive for what there offering, or are you going to make use of it?"
Biotech

Homeland Security Commissions LED-Based Puke-Saber 378

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the this-one-won't-cut-off-hands dept.
E++99 writes "Homeland Security has contracted with Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. to develop an "LED Incapacitator," a nonlethal weapon consisting of a large flashlight with a cluster of LEDs capable of emitting "super-bright pulses of light at rapidly changing wavelengths." Sounds innocuous enough... until they they shine "the evil color" at you and you start puking! A working prototype has been completed, and they will soon be putting it through its paces. Homeland Security hopes to give it to Border Patrol agents and National Guardsmen by 2010."
Encryption

EMI May Remove DRM From Parts of Catalog 161

Posted by Zonk
from the almost-too-good-to-be-true dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica is reporting that EMI may announce on Monday that it will be freeing much of its catalog from the shackles of DRM. The Wall Street Journal, in a subscription-only portion of its site, is saying that that Apple CEO Steve Jobs will be present at the announcement in London and that the music will be sold through the iTunes Store and possibly other online outlets. In early February rumblings were heard that EMI was thinking about ditching DRM, but EMI was unable to entice the likes of Apple, Microsoft, and others. As it turned out, EMI wanted a considerable advance payment to offset what it perceived as a risk: selling DRM-free music online. EMI's position was simple: if they sell music without DRM, then users will find trading it that much easier." There's also rumours of an Apple/Beatles announcement sometime today, perhaps tied into this drm decision.
Windows

+ - Prescription Meds for Windows Vista Sleep Disorder

Submitted by
Arnold O'Connor
Arnold O'Connor writes "NeoSmart Technologies has compiled a list of hotfixes and patches provided by Microsoft for Windows Vista SP1 that address a (large) number of issues related to waking/resuming a Windows Vista (both x86 and x64) PC from sleep or hibernation. Sleep-related disorders have plagued Windows Vista since its release, and most are due to be included in Windows Vista SP1 (Codenam Fiji)."
Software

+ - Opera /. easter egg and new speed dial feature

Submitted by Thelomen
Thelomen (1074114) writes "Opera Browser contains a fairly unknown Easter Egg: Simply type /. in the address bar and you are taken directly to Slashdot.org. This easter egg was recently reported over at OperaWatch.com .

Other recent news from Opera is their new Speed Dial feature, precent in the most recent build from Desktop Team. Speed Dial is nothing more than 9 bookmarks you can open with CTRL+1 to CTRL+9, however the pages on the Speed Dial are shown as a thumbnail and automatically prefetched in background, making it ideal if you have some heavy pages among your top 10 bookmarks, and you may come to use this feature much more than you thought."
PC Games (Games)

+ - Viiv Versus Live!, Battle For The Living Room ?

Submitted by
Spinnerbait
Spinnerbait writes " Intel Viiv and AMD Live! branding and standardization efforts for Media Center PC architectures have their pluses and minuses, depending on what you intend to do with your system. While Intel imposes strict guidelines on system builders for the use of Intel chipsets with integrated graphics, AMD's Live! platform allows for third party chipset vendors like NVIDIA to enter the fray. As a result, pre-built systems based on Intel Viiv branding may come up short, when you consider how strong an AMD platform may be with an nForce IGP chipset versus the i965G. Viiv versus Live! is an interesting dynamic for the DYI market, where you can definitely build yourself a more capable Intel-based HTPC that isn't Viiv compliant."
Programming

+ - Alternatives to SF.net's CompileFarm?

Submitted by cronie
cronie (698178) writes "Not long ago, SourceForge.net announced it shuts down the Compile Farm — a collection of computers running wide variety of OSes, available for compiling and testing open-source projects. SF.net states their resources "are best used at this time in improving other parts" of the service. I seriously consider this sad news for the OSS community, because portability is one of the strengths of OSS, and not many of us, developers, have such variety of platforms in our possession to compile and test our software on. As a consequence, I expect many projects dropping support for some of the platforms they simply don't have access to. Are there any sound alternatives with at least some popular OS/hardware combinations? Any plans to create one? (Perhaps Google or IBM might come up with something?)"

"In matters of principle, stand like a rock; in matters of taste, swim with the current." -- Thomas Jefferson

Working...