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Comment: Re:Militia, then vs now (Score 1) 1583

by jittles (#46779253) Attached to: Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

At the time there were limited arms (you took about 2 minutes to reload) vs able to empty a couple clips in that same amount of time, now.

First of all, the red coats could fire their weapon at a rate of about 3-4 rounds per minute. Second of all, it's not difficult to empty a clip at all. A stripper clip is designed to empty very quickly. The real rate of fire is how quickly you can empty a magazine. That is the rate of fire for a weapon, and not a tool used to reload the magazine itself (a clip). And anyway, it was perfectly legal to own swords and other weapons back then. I'm not saying that we should allow people to own anything they want. I am just saying you don't have a very good understanding of these weapons.

Comment: Re:IRL! (Score 1) 303

by jittles (#46757641) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

A few years ago we had some Chinese exchange workers come and work for us. At the end of their stint, they did a bit of a presentation about similar work in China. They did a bit of background on China, and were still calling Taiwan part of China! I was a bit flabbergasted...

Different perspectives or propaganda I guess. Eye opener either way.

Did you know that Taiwan also calls itself China? There is the PRC (the mainland side) and ROC (Taiwan side). The first is the Peoples Republic of China, and the second is the Republic of China. They both consider the other to be part of their territory and are waiting for the other side to give in to their leadership.

Comment: Re:It's OK for Apple but not Microsoft? (Score 1) 574

by jittles (#46755773) Attached to: Microsoft Confirms It Is Dropping Windows 8.1 Support

Never mind the huge difference between an OS for a disposable device, and an OS for computers that is expected to last for a decade or more

Since when were computers ever supposed to last a decade? In the United States, the IRS (tax agency) allows you to deduct computer costs in the year they are purchased. For a durable good the IRS forces you to amortize the cost of a business expense over the life expectancy of the item. So that tells you that even the federal government doesn't expect your computer to be worth keeping long term. I might keep a computer for 5-6 years for browsing the internet and checking my email (perhaps even longer) but 3-4 years for a work computer is very long indeed! I'll be keeping my cellphone for 4-5 years if the battery life is acceptable.

Comment: Re:won't stop fraud_just use regular video cam (Score 1) 104

by jittles (#46728769) Attached to: NYC Considers Google Glass For Restaurant Inspections

google glass won't keep...um...people from bribing each other...they can just exchange the money at another time

There's two parts to a bribe- transferring the money (which you addressed), and actually doing what you're being bribed to do. If the inspection is recorded, the inspector can't ignore problems that he sees. I suppose he could deliberately not look in places he knows there are problems, but then the (recorded) inspection would be incomplete.

No he can't hide violations as easily. Instead, he'll notify the owner and the "random inspection" will not be so random or unexpected anymore. You're not likely to fail a health inspection if you know they're coming!

Comment: Re:Equality? How about sports? (Score 1) 673

by jittles (#46714397) Attached to: Google: Teach Girls Coding, Get $2,500; Teach Boys, Get $0

In school sports the boy's sports programs are granted a lot more money, even with Title 9. Do you think Ole Miss or Ohio State are as generous as the girls programs (including admissions) as they are with boys football? If benefactors want to pay girls more to learn programming then it is wonderful?

I believe you are mistaken, to be quite honest. The university I went to bent over backwards to comply with Title 9. They cut every men's sport that was not profitable (down to football, basketball, and wrestling). They also had to recruit female athletes from out of state/country in order to match scholarship funding. They put out adverts in the school paper indicating scholarships were available for walk-on female athletes. They had a women's equestrian team (which is very expensive) specifically so they could balance out football spending. It was almost impossible to be a male athlete at my school unless you were a superstar. You could walk on to the women's soccer team and get a sport's scholarship. Does that seem very fair to the men?

Comment: Re:It's not trending. (Score 2) 371

by jittles (#46695635) Attached to: Smart Car Tipping Trending In San Francisco

This wouldn't even be an issue if the damn local news didn't report on it. 3 cars?! A night of drunken stupidity. Now it's going to be trending.

Eh when I was a wee lad we used to do the same thing with the Honda N600. Boys will be boys. The tricky part is sneaking out into the pasture without getting any dung on your shoes. And heaven help you if you tip the thing onto you!

Comment: Re:Alternatives (Score 3, Informative) 240

by jittles (#46684979) Attached to: Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS

A quick search reveals http://www.noip.com/, and I'm sure they'll be more. Anyway isn't this supposed to be a stopgap before IPV6 means we can all have permanent static IPS?!

I've been using ZoneEdit for a long time. They've changed their business model slightly. Don't know if they still offer as many free options any more, but they have been great for me for over 10 years now!

Comment: Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (Score 1) 402

by jittles (#46657345) Attached to: NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

Yes, yes, just as Neil Armstrong and Harrison Schmidt returned to Earth. But with any luck, there are people who are alive today who will help to settle the Moon - and die there of old age. Humanity must either continue out to the other planets, and to the planets of other stars, or our race will die here in the cradle of Earth the next time a BIG rock hits the Earth, we will become extinct. I'm a big believer in humanity not becoming extinct.

The ultimate "space exploration is immoral" argument boils down to one of two things. Either you're a coward, and think all humans should be cowards, or you hate humanity and APPROVE of the idea of human extinction. Because if we sit here long enough, it WILL happen. It's a statistical certainty.

The less-sane of the commenters here seem to think that we're about to blast off for Mars tomorrow. It's not going to happen; we don't have any rockets. We can't even send more Americans to the International Space Station, now that NASA has decided to cut off cooperation with the Russians. But by the time we _can_ go to Mars, we'll be ready to live there - for a long time. Will it be ten years? Thirty? Fifty? Hell, I'm astonished that we haven't even been back to the Moon in the last 40 years. We could be on Mars NOW, if we had wanted to, in 1980.

So, let's start NOW. It won't be easy, it won't be cheap, and it won't be entirely safe - but nothing worthwhile ever is. People died learning about electricity. Marie Curie died learning about radium. People died learning how to fly, and people died learning how to dive, and people die every day in learning how to drive. People will die learning how to build lunar habitats, and learning how to land on Mars, and how to build homes there. And a lot more people WON'T die, and we'll learn what we need to know to settle Mars, and to build starships.

And just as it has always done, the knowledge that we gain in doing these things and going those places will make life easier and safer for you cowards who stay behind.

I'm not saying that we should not be preparing such a mission. I am just saying that we should not send anyone on a one-way trip without careful consideration. Human beings are very fickle. Someone who wants that one way trip now may change their mind in two weeks. Besides, there may be resources on Mars that we want to bring back to Earth anyway, so it will become more economically feasible if we can send raw materials back to the Earth.

Comment: Re:Cynicism (Score 1) 148

My mobile provider (3, in the UK) has started rolling out a thing that lets you use your inclusive minutes and data allowance in other countries without any extra charge (the costs if you go over those limits are pretty dire). It was actually cheaper for me to use data on my mobile when I visit the US than it was for the people I was visiting, on my last trip. I think they've seen the writing on the wall and started making these agreements long before they were needed. They're able to do this and charge 3p/minute for calls, 2p/text and 1p/MB for data (pre-pay - if you get a bundle and buy in bulk then things are cheaper, but the bundles are time limited).

Just got back from a trip out of the US. With T-mobile I had free text and data in three different countries but the cost for a voice call was $0.20 a minute. Of course, with free data, I could use my voip service to make calls at $0.01 per minute.

Comment: Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (Score 1) 402

by jittles (#46647959) Attached to: NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

By your standard, the Plymouth and Jamestown colonies were "suicide missions"; the people who boarded the Mayflower never expected to come back.

The first people that went to the new world did come back, though. Christopher Columbus didn't just hang out in Hispanola for the rest of his life. The people who went to Jamestown and Plymouth had the capability of coming back if those so chose. In fact, some early colonists did just that. There is a huge difference.

Never put off till run-time what you can do at compile-time. -- D. Gries

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