Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Semantics (Score 1) 540

by jittles (#48213035) Attached to: The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

"Any reasonable person should be able to tell when someone is uncomfortable" - bzzzt! This implies that they display the discomfort instead of internalizing, brooding and acting on it later. The dongle incident is a good example of your statement not working.

The victim in the dongle incident was unusually sensitive. That is why a key element in such cases is that the personal has to externalize their discomfort and tell the perpetrator that they are uncomfortable in the situation. If someone is unusually sensitive then the onus is on them to let people know. If you're doing or saying something that is questionable, it should be obvious, based on the person's reaction, whether you should stop.

Comment: Re:Semantics (Score 1) 540

by jittles (#48212363) Attached to: The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

So the GP missed the key point there, which is that it has to be both unwelcome and troublesome. No, you missed the point that the "victim" defines both of those conditions subjectively.

In any reasonable jurisdiction, harassment IS subjective to the receiver of the attention, but they must notify the culprit that they do not appreciate their attention. Any reasonable person should be able to tell when someone is uncomfortable with their behavior, and modify their behavior towards that person accordingly. Where it becomes tricky is when the harasser is in a position of authority. A subordinate may not feel like they can say no. In that case, it is up to others to determine whether or not it was reasonable for the harasser to know that their behavior was unappreciated.

Comment: Re:PUFFERY IS FRAUD (Score 1) 91

by jittles (#48211555) Attached to: Judge Says EA Battlefield 4 Execs Engaged In "Puffery," Not Fraud

If one tells it like it is puffery is fraud just as a salesman's soap is fraud. If a product is desireable enough no sales efforts are required. The reason that we have marketing and sales is that most products really are not desireable at all.

How do I know what a product does without sales or marketing? Someone has to know about it in order for word of mouth to take effect. And what is word of mouth but a viral marketing campaign? I agree that most products are average or mediocre, but to say that sales and marketing is completely useless on a desirable product is naivety at its finest.

Comment: Re:Since these people still don't get it.... (Score 1) 78

by jittles (#48204001) Attached to: DHS Investigates 24 Potentially Lethal IoT Medical Devices
My point is that you can't depend on the language to protect you. I'm not saying you should ignore good technology choices because you know better than those crazy compiler people. But I do not believe that it is possible to create something that is completely unhackable. Perhaps you can create something that is non-trivial to exploit, or that is unexploitable using known techniques, but that doesn't mean that you can create a software/hardware combination that is completely foolproof. There will always be risk associated with any device that is network accessible.

Comment: Re:Secure it but.... (Score 1) 78

by jittles (#48203771) Attached to: DHS Investigates 24 Potentially Lethal IoT Medical Devices
Tattoos can be damaged or destroyed. People can get your password when they video tape you undressing at a department store changing room, or even by implanting hidden cameras in your home. But I supposed if someone went to those efforts to get your pacemaker password, they would find some way to kill you.

Comment: Re:Since these people still don't get it.... (Score 1) 78

by jittles (#48203735) Attached to: DHS Investigates 24 Potentially Lethal IoT Medical Devices

Anything computerized with a network connection can (and most likely WILL) be hacked...

Not if you take appropriate precautions, like using a safe programming language.

Last I checked, programming languages are designed and implemented by human beings. Even if a programming language can decrease your attack surface, there could still be an exploit associated with the interpreter/compiler or a mistake in implementation of the language. When an omniscient being develops your language and its corresponding dev tools, I would say you may have a meaningful point.

Comment: Re:All about perception (Score 1) 200

by jittles (#48185687) Attached to: The Woman Who Should Have Been the First Female Astronaut
I agree with you. Just wanted to say that it is natural for men and women to have different strengths and weaknesses (I mean this in a general way). I think it's a good thing. The real key is how they are treated, and how they treat others. Equality is a two way street. Men and women both need to accept that they, as individuals, have weaknesses and strengths and just get on with enjoying life.

Comment: Re:First taste of Mac OS X (Score 1) 303

by jittles (#48170647) Attached to: OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

It's a shame they differ. But let's face it, actually having Foo.bar and foo.bar, or worse still Foo.bar and Foo.BAR in the same directory is a silly thing to do.

I agree that it is not a best practice, but I have dealt with this issue before. Usually caused by someone who doesn't realize that they're dealing with a case-sensitive filesystem.

Comment: Re:Interesting they keep doing lengthly reviews... (Score 1) 303

by jittles (#48170071) Attached to: OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

Downgrading an OS by a major version is asking to break it. The upgrade scripts will normally change various datafile formats and contents. That's not a reversible process unless there are equivalent scripts to go the other way. And what OS developer is going to put the same development and testing effort into going backwards?

Thats not to say that you can't in GNU/Linux. GNU/Linux lets you tinker with most things. But it generally offers no protection from breaking everything when you do so.

Of course the right thing to do regardless of platform is to make sure you do a complete backup before upgrading, so you can go back to that if you want to.

Go ahead and try to wipe the entire drive and then install an older version of MacOS. Put in a new drive and try to install an older version. They change something - I don't know if its in the SMC or something, but it will give you an error. I do not mean downgrading the OS on top of an existing install. I mean a fresh install of an older OS.

Comment: Re:First taste of Mac OS X (Score 1) 303

by jittles (#48169413) Attached to: OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

My Mac has been set up to be case insensitive. LS, GrEp, cAT, TAIl all behave as if they had been typed lowercase.

So? Why is this an issue?

Linux filesystems are, by default, case sensitive. I can have Foo.bar and foo.bar in the same directory. If my source control is set up properly, I can see and work with both files properly on Linux but not on Mac OS. You can use a case-sensitive filesystem in MacOS, but last time I tried the OS itself was very buggy and unpredictable when dealing with files. Perhaps this has been fixed since 10.8, I don't know, but the general rule of thumb is to NOT use a case-sensitive FS on MacOS.

Comment: Re:Interesting they keep doing lengthly reviews... (Score 1) 303

by jittles (#48169357) Attached to: OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

These Ars OSX reviews have always been really impressive things, full of technical examination and as you can see, very long to write...

It made more sense to me back when you had to pay for an upgrade though, so you could see if it was worth getting. Now that it's free, the need for long technical examination seems to diminish...

That said I hope they keep doing them because it is nice to have a deep technical examination of what is new.

Apple makes it very difficult for the average person to downgrade after you upgrade OS. If you try and run, for instance, the Mavericks installer after having upgraded to Yosemite, it will fail and tell you to install a newer version of OS X. There may or may not be a way around this, I've never tried.

Comment: Re:Just think (Score 1) 183

Good point. Now we need to exert the same pressure on Google for Android support for external devices and regular-ass USB storage device mode for connecting Android devices to hosts.

Google started requiring Android File Transfer for connecting Android devices so that the phone would not need to unmount the drive before allowing the host to mount it. I'm sure they could have come up with a better, more native adaptation to this, but it is what it is.

The flow chart is a most thoroughly oversold piece of program documentation. -- Frederick Brooks, "The Mythical Man Month"

Working...