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Comment: Re:C is dead (Score 1) 640

by jimbolauski (#48554995) Attached to: How Relevant is C in 2014?

It is crazy how much more C code is needed to get the same level of performance and security that equivalent C++ has

They both require the same amount of code that code is just hidden in C++, just because you don't see it doesn't mean it's not there.

And for all those who will say that C++ can't fit in the tight spaces that C can...well, you're wrong. Just disable the parts of C++ that you don't want (usually exceptions), and you can still get most of the benefits of clean code and RAII, with the same or better performance.

Creating drivers, firmware, kernels, and embedded applications using c++ will have external dependencies you will have to support those dependencies which will use up valuable space, C does not have this issue. Windows and Macs both have limited stdlib support of c++ at the kernel level, things like new and delete are not supported. There is a time and place for everything you just have to know what code is appropriate.

Just look at all the extensions that C compilers, and even the C11 Standard, borrow from C++ (generics, RAII) - but in a convoluted ugly way to preserve the precious ABI for 50 years.

There is no standard ABI in C, the ABI is platform dependent and always has been. It would make no sense to have a standard ABI as there are many different platforms and every platform but one would have to emulate the chosen platform. I suspect you have very little experience with C and this is why you think C++ is always the right answer

Different codes work better for different applications but first you have to intimate understanding of those codes. A good programmer knows the strengths and weaknesses of each and can choose accordingly

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 262

by jimbolauski (#48507011) Attached to: Obama Offers Funding For 50,000 Police Body Cameras

Why is this a federal charge? While I firmly believe all cops should wear cameras, I also firmly believe individual departments should be paying for them.

It's not the federal government's money in the first place, it's the people's. The only push back on this issue is from police unions and privacy advocates, I would say this is a perfect use of federally confiscated money.

Comment: Re:Super-capitalism (Score 1) 516

by jimbolauski (#48466907) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?
Their outages are not just due to energy shortages, after a snow storm one city lost power for 3 weeks in 2008. As long as you have above ground power you will be susceptible to storms causing power outages, the only difference is that China keeps a tight lid on negative information.

Comment: Re:Super-capitalism (Score 2) 516

by jimbolauski (#48466195) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?
I don't know where you get your sources but China has power outage problems.

Blackouts appear to be the worst in smaller towns like Yiyang here in Hunan, one of Chinaâ(TM)s largest and most populous provinces. The power shortages are threatening to curb the explosive growth the province has experienced since the opening in late 2009 of a high-speed electric train link to prosperous Guangdong province to the south, which helped companies tap Hunanâ(TM)s cheaper land and labor force.â

Energy shortages have forced factories to cut production and ration their energy supplies. In some cases factories operate only a night when demand for energy is low. In other cases they have been forced to shut down completely for more than two weeks. The shortages were particularly hard on industries that need a lot of energy like aluminum, steel and cement and ones with furnaces that need a constant supply f energy or they break.

Factories in Guangdong were told that their power would be cut one day a week, then two days a week, then five days a week, during peak hours. Under these conditions the factories switched production to the night and on weekends of bought their own diesel generators, which increased manufacturing costs by around 5 percent.

In Shanghai there have been runs on power generators and power has been cut to factories while neon lights were allowed to keep blinking on the Bund; decorative lights on skyscrapers are kept on late into the night; and air conditioning is kept on the fancy shopping malls so that everything seems to hunky dory to visitors ib Shanghai.

Power outages have been a boon for makers of diesel generators of all sizes. General Electric, Siemens and Mitsubishi heavy Industries have won large contracts supplying turbines and other technology for Chinaâ(TM)s power-generating plants.

Comment: Re:No thank you (Score 1) 267

by jimbolauski (#48329769) Attached to: 'Star Wars: Episode VII' Gets a Name
Oceans 11, the original was an awful musical.
The Fly, the original costumes and make up took away from the story
Scarface, the original was from 1932
True Grit, the original was a spaghetti western
There are probably even more westerns that were better then the originals but you get the point there are more then a few remakes that exceeded the originals.

Comment: Re:This is great news! (Score 1) 485

by jimbolauski (#48304373) Attached to: Silicon Valley Swings To Republicans
The unemployment rate is not a good indicator that our economy is turning around. People that are not working but have given up looking for work are not counted in the unemployment rate. The labor participation rate is a better indicator of our economy as it is a measure of how many people are working which has been in decline since 2009. Labor Force Participation Rate

If it happens once, it's a bug. If it happens twice, it's a feature. If it happens more than twice, it's a design philosophy.

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