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Submission Stanford bioengineers develop "Neurocore" chips 9,000 times faster than a PC

kelk1 writes: From the Stanford News Service:

Stanford bioengineers have developed faster, more energy-efficient microchips based on the human brain – 9,000 times faster and using significantly less power than a typical PC. This offers greater possibilities for advances in robotics and a new way of understanding the brain. For instance, a chip as fast and efficient as the human brain could drive prosthetic limbs with the speed and complexity of our own actions.

Boahen and his team have developed Neurogrid, a circuit board consisting of 16 custom-designed "Neurocore" chips. Together these 16 chips can simulate 1 million neurons and billions of synaptic connections. The team designed these chips with power efficiency in mind. (...) The result was Neurogrid – a device about the size of an iPad that can simulate orders of magnitude more neurons and synapses than other brain mimics on the power it takes to run a tablet computer.

But much work lies ahead. Each of the current million-neuron Neurogrid circuit boards cost about $40,000. (...) Neurogrid is based on 16 Neurocores, each of which supports 65,536 neurons. Those chips were made using 15-year-old fabrication technologies. By switching to modern manufacturing processes and fabricating the chips in large volumes, he could cut a Neurocore's cost 100-fold – suggesting a million-neuron board for $400 a copy. With that cheaper hardware and compiler software to make it easy to configure, these neuromorphic systems could find numerous applications.

Submission Can you teach critical thinking?

jhswope writes: Recent post regarding critical thinking has me wondering. Can you teach critical thinking to anyone? How do you accomplish that? I've known many engineers who are completely incompetent in various forms of critical thinking. A mechanical engineer with absolutely no idea of how to recognize a bad investment. An optical engineer who couldn't figure out how to remove a door knob without using a hack saw.

        Very intelligent people but no analysis skills in other ares.

Submission I fired my boss->

An anonymous reader writes: Back in July 2013, I decided to quit my low paying, time consuming job. It was a science job with no future, I had to constantly sacrifice my family to work long hours. I was under pressure and sick all the time. I realized that life had more to offer than suffering through a job. The day I made a decision to quit I had the weight off my shoulders. I am not here to live to others' expectations, I am here to direct my own life. I started internet marketing, and that is the best choice I have ever made. Never will I look back.
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Comment Not all the schools fault (Score 0) 306

Easy to blame schools but the parents spend much more time with their children and should have a more formative influence on the child. Many don't, I am not sure why they even had children. My child can't read.... I could read before I ever got to school (Thanks Mom). My child has no work ethic and so on and so forth. Until you fix your parenting don't try to fix the schools or even lay the blame at their feet. If your child is underperforming or if your employee is underperforming, what have YOU done to resolve that issue?

Comment Sun Sparc Workstations (Score 0) 702

I used to administer a stack of 20 or so of these that were 15+ years old. Roofed leaked in the server room directly above them. Water ran down the entire stack and pooled on the floor. I opened each machine and there was no water inside of any of the cases. This pissed me off because I was really hoping they would die.

Submission IBM's Art of Invention

Roland Piquepaille writes: "The 'Art of Invention' is the name of an exhibit which opened last week at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Museum in Alexandria, Virginia. This exhibit, which will last one year, is featuring 70 works of art created through inventions, patents and trademarks. Two of these works have been provided by IBM and show images created using IBM's Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) in the early 1990s. IBM labeled these works as 'the world's tiniest art on display' and added they 'show nanotechnology at its finest.' The images are beautiful, but IBM's claim might be a little bit exaggerated: watch for example the NanoArt contest held earlier this year. Read more for additional references and, of course, for the art work provided by IBM."

Comment Wanted: New slashdot Super Villain (Score 0, Offtopic) 694

It seems as if Cowboy Neal is no longer upholding the traditions of super villains. Why do we continue to use him to represent all that is evil in the world..... New Year calls for a new Villian. Really what has he done? I have heard of no foiled plots of world take over, no failed super weapon experiments, no diabolical viruses being generated, etc I am certain at this point his only crime is polluting the atmosphere after eating a burrito. Please help us find a true villian to hate and despise and defeat in every way.

The most likely candidates for flame wars are:

George W.
Bill Gates
Steve Ballmer

I suggest the last person who told me to RTFM instead of answering a simple question.

"We don't care. We don't have to. We're the Phone Company."