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Comment Re:Sexual Assault (Score 1) 462

The only true statement in your post is the first and 2nd one the 3rd one reveals that most people make up excuses to feel better about their lame jobs and then the 4th one is completely your own creation.

The second statement is true according to Microsoft.

The fourth is indeed my own creation, based only on my own experience dealing with myself. Not sexual harassment in my case, but we were all young and dumb once.

Comment Re:What's a DLL? (Score 3, Interesting) 117

It's no longer a problem with MS libraries but it can still be a problem with third party dll's, the problem is not that different to having symlinks point to multiple versions of an .so file in unix. In both cases it works when done correctly, but it's easy to get the wires crossed if you're not careful.

Comment Re:What's a DLL? (Score 2) 117

There is no "bug" with the installers or windows, the machine has been compromised prior to running the software.

TFA is a "beat up" (likely paid for by Oracle), it does not explain how the attacker is able to put the compromised dll on the machine in the first place. If an attacker can put a random binary on your local drive then they already own your machine. What a random installer subsequently does on a compromised machine is irrelevant to how the machine was hacked.

Car analogy: If a miscreant cuts your brake line without your knowledge, it is not the manufacturer's fault that the brakes no longer work as advertised. If the manufacturer's can make it more difficult to cut the brake line that's great, but they cannot, and should not, be held accountable for malicious damage caused by someone who had unrestricted access to your brake line.

Comment Re:Cores Schmores (Score 3, Informative) 121

The Thunderbird was nice, but it was more of a price/performance winner than overall performance. A 1GHz Thunderbird ran stable at 1.3GHz and was similar performance to a 2GHz Pentium 4 at a fraction of the cost (particularly as the P4 required RAMBUS DRAM, so you could stick twice as much DDR in Athlon for the same money). It wasn't until the Opteron that AMD really started winning on performance. The integrated DRAM controller was a big win and being first to 64 bits (which, on x86, means more GPRs, sane floating point ISA, and PC-relative addressing) gave them a huge advantage. Unfortunately, they haven't really been competitive since the Core 2, except in market segments where Intel intentionally cripples their offerings (e.g. no more than 2 SATA ports on the Atom Mini-ITX boards to avoid competition with the i3 boards, making AMD the only viable option).

Comment Re: What's the viable alternative? (Score 1) 154

I left HS in 1975, boys in my HS were not allowed to learn typing, cooking or dressmaking. Girls were not allowed to learn woodwork, metalwork or mechanical drawing. I also thought typewriters were "cool" but never so much as touched one until I bought a second hand Apple ][ (a decade after leaving HS). I have been a degree qualified software developer for 25yrs now. I don't give a flying fuck if you are 'embarrassed' by my inability to touch type because it has had exactly zero impact on my career.

Comment Re:so what? (Score 1) 267

You're mixing up capability with likelihood. Total risk is the product of the two. The U.S. has had nuclear-capable ICBMs for over 50 years now, but has never used them. So while it has had the capability for a long time, the proven likelihood that it'll use them is very low, even when it's been provoked. The reason people (not just the U.S.) is concerned about North Korea's capability is because its leadership is extremely erratic and unpredictable, so the likelihood it would actually use ICBMs is a lot higher than existing nuclear powers'.

On the contrary, NK has had nuclear weapons for quite a while and has never used them beyond testing. As with any mutual-assured destruction weapon, showing a capability for something does not indicate anything about willingness to use them at any time except a doomsday scenario.

Depending on the success of this test, and certainly prior to this point, NK only had MAD capability against its immediate neighbors, China, South Korea, and Japan. The only deterrents they had against US invasion were indirect, through threats on US allies. A working ICBM gives them a better ability to deter the type of regime change we pulled in Iraq.

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