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Electronic Frontier Foundation

Submission + - Non-profit secure & private ISP planned form ISP who fought NSLs and the FBI (cnet.com)

erfnet writes: "Nick Merrill, previously mentioned here http://yro.slashdot.org/story/10/08/12/1721255/isp-owner-who-fought-fbi-spying-freed-from-gag-order when fighting a gag order from the FBI, is planning a new ISP "designed from its inception to shield its customers from surveillance...The ISP would not merely employ every technological means at its disposal, including encryption and limited logging, to protect its customers. It would also — and in practice this is likely more important — challenge government surveillance demands of dubious legality or constitutionality." Does this have a chance of success at protecting citizen's privacy and due process rights? Or will Congress quickly change the law to require even more stringent "legal intercept"? Fundraising tool Kickstarter has already turned him down, forcing him to go to IndieGoGo to raise donations."

Submission + - The ISP that pledges to put your privacy first (cnet.com)

jez9999 writes: Nicholas Merrill is planning to revolutionize online privacy by launching a non-profit ISP that would do everything it could to protect users' privacy via mobile connections, and landline connections from $20 a month.

The ISP would try to challenge any orders from the government for data disclosure that were questionable in court; that is, if they even have the capability to release the private information requested. "The idea that we are working on is to not be capable of complying" with requests from the FBI for stored e-mail and similar demands, Merrill says.


Submission + - Fully functional Nintendo controller coffee table (tech-stew.com)

techfun89 writes: "Ever wished that you could defeat Bowser literally right from your coffee table with giant built in buttons? Well, your dreams have come true with the fully-functional Nintendo Controller Coffee Table. This is the creation of Charles Lushear that has combined old school entertainment with maple wood and craftsmanship. Simply plug into an existing classic NES system and go to town. The table also features a removable glass top with retractable cord to use the furniture as just a table when you are done playing Mario. All for around $3500."

Submission + - UK ISPs Make Deal With BPI (bbc.co.uk) 1

daemonburrito writes: The BBC reports that the six largest ISPs in the UK have agreed to a deal with the trade group British Phonographic Industry, assisted by government arbitration. Under the reported terms of the deal, the ISPs will begin mailing notices to subscribers identified by the BPI, and aim for a "significant reduction" in music sharing. Hundreds of thousands of notices are expected.
The Internet

Submission + - UK Government Plans to Disconnect File Sharers

brown-eyed slug writes: "A leaked consultation document describes the UK government's intention to cut the internet access of illegal downloaders. After an email warning and then a suspension, repeat offenders would have their contracts cancelled. Broadband firms that do not enforce the rules would also face prosecution. The Internet Service Providers Association wants a voluntary agreement, "Every right-thinking body knows that self-regulation is much the better option in these areas," but discussions between ISPs and the entertainment industry have not yet led to an agreement on the issue."

Submission + - Major blow for OLPC (bbc.co.uk)

carvell writes: According to reports, it looks like Intel have pulled out of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project, citing "philosophical" differences as the reason. Back in May 2007 the OLPC founder, Nicholas Negroponte said that Intel should be ashamed of themselves, as they had planned a "rival" "classmate" laptop, intended to drive out the OLPC competition. Could this latest development be related to the classmate at all? Although OLPC appear to be using AMD processors, surely the loss of a major company backing the project will have repercussions for the OLPC project as a whole.

Submission + - Intel drops OLPC support (bbc.co.uk)

siddesu writes: Intel has pulled out of the OLPC project, citing "philosophical differences". An Intel representative, Chuck Molly has commented that OLPC project has asked Intel to drop support for "rival" low-cost PC projects, including Classmate PC, and "to focus on the OLPC platform exclusively. At the end of the day, we decided we couldn't accommodate that request."

The OLPC has not yet commented on the story.

More available on the BBC site and here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119940537839566305.html


Submission + - Intel remove support from OLPC

smithberry writes: The One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project has not to look far for its troubles lately, as stories on /. over the last few weeks prove. The BBC are now reporting that Intel are removing their support. The article is very brief, but it says

Citing "philosophical" differences, Intel has withdrawn its funding and technical help from the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project.
Arstechnica say it changes very little because OLPC are committed to AMD, but I wonder what the long term outlook for OLPC is now? Is this the end of the beginning, or the beginning of the end? Have they simply paved the way for some similar project to come along with newer and cheaper hardware and gain from the OLPC concept? So many questions, and only time will tell.
The Internet

Submission + - Net Neutrality Debate crosses the Atlantic (independent.co.uk)

smallfries writes: The network neutrality debate has raged on in the States for some time now. Now broadband providers in the UK have banded together to threaten the BBC that plans to provide programming over "their" network could disrupt operations. The BBC is being asked to cough up the readies to pay for bandwidth charges, otherwise traffic shaping will be used to limit access to the iPlayer. Strange really, I thought that the monthly fee we pay already was to cover access ... but maybe it only covers the final mile and they need to be paid twice to cover the rest of the journey.

Submission + - UK Lords committee blasts 'e-crime' (channel4.com)

jez9999 writes: A House of Lords report says that the government must do more to protect internet users from the threat of 'e-crime'.

The report claims that the internet is now "the playground of criminals", and that UK internet users are now more scared of internet crime than burglary. It suggests a wide range of security measures that the government should take to increase the confidence of internet users, including making 'software firms' (BBC Radio 5 Live used the term 'ISPs') compensate users for 'e-fraud'.


Submission + - Music from DNA patented (genome-technology.com)

stm2 writes: "Two lawers patented the idea of generating music from a DNA sequence. According to the patent, it covers "music generated by decoding and transcribing genetic information within a DNA sequence into a music signal having melody and harmony". I remember seeing such a algorithms since earlier 90's. Is this another well known idea that gets patented?"

Submission + - AMD giving away free "half life 2: lost coast&

Vo1t writes: I would like to share with the /. community the news about AMD giving away Half Life 2: Lost Coast and Deathmatch for all their customers. This page gives you details on what you have to do to get them.

"Survey says..." -- Richard Dawson, weenie, on "Family Feud"