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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 24 declined, 1 accepted (25 total, 4.00% accepted)

Security

+ - Ask Slashdot: Is HTTPS snooping becoming more acceptable? 4

Submitted by
jez9999
jez9999 writes "I recently worked for a relatively large company that imposed so-called transparent HTTPS proxying on their network. In practice, what this means is that they allow you to use HTTPS through their network, but it must be proxied through their server and their server must be trusted as a root CA. They were using the Cisco IronPort device to do this. The "transparency" seems to come from the fact that they tend to install their root CA into Internet Explorer's certificate store, so IE won't actually warn you that your HTTPS traffic may be being snooped on (nor will any other browser that uses IE's cert store, like Chrome). Is this a reasonable policy? Is it worth leaving a job over? Should it even be legal? It seems to me rather mad to go to huge effort to create a secure channel of communication for important data like online banking, transactions, and passwords, and then to just effectively hand over the keys to your employer. Or am I overreacting?"
Security

+ - Ask Slashdot: Transparent HTTPS proxying - acceptable or abominable?->

Submitted by
jez9999
jez9999 writes "I recently worked for a relatively large company that imposed so-called transparent HTTPS proxying on their network. In practice, what this means is that they allow you to use HTTPS through their network, but it must be proxied through their server and their server must be trusted as a root CA. They were using the Cisco IronPort device to do this. The "transparency" seems to come from the fact that they tend to install their root CA into Internet Explorer's certificate store, so IE won't actually warn you that your HTTPS traffic may be being snooped on (nor will any other browser that uses IE's cert store, like Chrome). Is this a reasonable policy? Is it worth leaving a job over? Should it even be legal? It seems to me rather mad to go to huge effort to create a secure channel of communication for important data like online banking, transactions, and passwords, and then to just effectively hand over the keys to your employer. Or am I overreacting?"
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - The ISP that pledges to put your privacy first->

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "Nicholas Merrill is planning to revolutionize online privacy by launching a non-profit ISP that would do everything it could to protect users' privacy via mobile connections, and landline connections from $20 a month.

The ISP would try to challenge any orders from the government for data disclosure that were questionable in court; that is, if they even have the capability to release the private information requested. "The idea that we are working on is to not be capable of complying" with requests from the FBI for stored e-mail and similar demands, Merrill says."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Home automation comes one step closer->

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "When Bill Gates unveiled his $100m networked mansion in the mid-90s, it barely seemed believable that mere plebs of more moderate financial standing might too one day use computers to adjust the ambient temperature of their living rooms and queue Chris Rea on the Jacuzzi stereo when they were driving home from the golf course. We still can't. But we are getting very close, thanks to technology from a company called Intamac, says one Inquirer article."
Link to Original Source
Biotech

+ - Scientists show off 'acoustic cloak' blueprint

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "A Spanish team of scientists have unveiled designs for an 'acoustic cloak'. The technology, outlined in the New Journal of Physics, could be used to build sound-proof homes, advanced concert halls or stealth warships.

The cloak uses so-called "sonic crystals". These artificial composites — also known as "meta-materials" — can be engineered to produce specific acoustical effects.

Noisy neighbours could be a thing of the past, if you have enough money to afford this!"
Earth

+ - Giant trees proposed to clear excess CO2

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "Wallace Broecker, the scientist who coined the term "global warming" in the 1970s, has proposed a radical solution to the problem of climate change. He advocated millions of "carbon scrubbers" — giant artificial trees to pull CO2 from the air. He did, however, admit that such a project faced an uphill struggle, as the political will to implement it would likely be lacking."
The Internet

+ - UK considers harsh punishment of music downloads

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "The UK government is considering banning people who they detect illegally downloading copyrighted music and movies from using the internet. They would require ISPs to try and detect, and then report, such activity to them.

The system would operate under a 'three strikes' rule, where users are twice warned, and then banned on the third infringement, from accessing the internet."
Education

+ - UK Professor argues for teaching of creationism 4

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "Head of science at London's Institute of Education Professor Michael Reiss argues that there is an educational value in comparing creationist ideas with scientific theories like Darwin's theory of evolution because they demonstrate how science, unlike religious beliefs, can be tested. He said: "The number of Muslim students has grown considerably in the last 10 to 20 years and a higher proportion of Muslim families do not accept evolutionary theory compared with Christian families. "That's one reason why it's more of an issue in [UK] schools." "By not dismissing their beliefs, we can ensure that these students learn what evolutionary theory really says — and give everyone the understanding to respect the views of others," he added."
Security

+ - UK Lords committee blasts 'e-crime'->

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "A House of Lords report says that the government must do more to protect internet users from the threat of 'e-crime'.

The report claims that the internet is now "the playground of criminals", and that UK internet users are now more scared of internet crime than burglary. It suggests a wide range of security measures that the government should take to increase the confidence of internet users, including making 'software firms' (BBC Radio 5 Live used the term 'ISPs') compensate users for 'e-fraud'."

Link to Original Source
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Bible-based actionfigures set to hit US toy market->

Submitted by jez9999
jez9999 (618189) writes "From the middle of August, Wal-Mart, the biggest toy retailer in the US, will for the first time stock a full line of faith-based toys. The dolls will go under the brand name, 'Tales of Glory'. The company behind the dolls, One2believe, hope that such figures as Goliath and Samson will help to make their dolls competetive in the notoriously difficult-to-crack US toy market."
Link to Original Source
Censorship

+ - Mother successfully lobbies to ban violent porn

Submitted by
jez9999
jez9999 writes "BBC News reports that the [UK] government has announced plans to make the possession of downloaded violent porn images punishable by three years in prison. It follows a campaign by Berkshire woman Liz Longhurst whose daughter Jane, a Brighton schoolteacher, was killed by Graham Coutts. It's already an offence in the UK to publish or distribute such material. Although violent porn will not appeal to many, nevertheless it is between consenting adults."

The first version always gets thrown away.

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