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Comment: Re:Mozilla doesn't build hardware (Score 3, Interesting) 89

by asa (#47289059) Attached to: Mozilla Is Working On a Firefox OS-powered Streaming Stick

Your attempt to confuse here isn't really helpful.

Google does *sell* Google Glass and Nexus phones and tablets and Chromecast and Nest and soon Dropcams and probably more. They are "Google products" branded and sold by Google as theirs.

Mozilla only has one device that it works on directly, the Firefox OS Flame reference phone. The rest of the hardware you see out there is being made and sold by someone else.

And that's not just true of the hardware. Much of the work going on to extend Firefox OS software into areas outside of phones is being done by third parties for their products.

Comment: Mozilla doesn't build hardware (Score 4, Informative) 89

by asa (#47288955) Attached to: Mozilla Is Working On a Firefox OS-powered Streaming Stick

Mozilla doesn't build hardware. We make software, including Firefox OS. Firefox OS is a completely open platform freely available for any company to build on top of without restriction. There are dozens of companies building Firefox OS-based products today and there will be more tomorrow, covering mobile phones, tablets, TVs, set top boxes, game consoles, streaming dongles, wearables, and more. Some of those companies are working directly with Mozilla and others are taking the code and running with it on their own.

Comment: Re:Not sure Sony are going to do much with this (Score 1) 46

by jeti (#47093655) Attached to: Hands-On With Sony's VR Headset

1. Yes, Sony has a bad track record when it comes to marketing VR glasses. (Did you even know that VR glasses for the PS2 exist?) However, with all the press Oculus has generated and the competition getting ready, Sony may be willing to make a bigger bet on VR.

2. FB seems to be going for a hands off approach that won't hinder the adoption of the Oculus Rift. I'm at least willing to take a wait and see approach before condemning the buyout. Apart from that, core members of Oculus like John Carmack and Michael Abrash as well as Mark Zuckerberg seem to be inspired to implement the Metaverse as described in Snow Crash. This is likely a medium term goal that comes on top of the general Oculus platform.

3. Valve has clearly stated that they are not interested in producing their own VR hardware. And the former core members of Valves VR team are now employed by Oculus. Valve will likely promote good VR hardware solutions and software and provide a uniform VR API. It's also probable that we'll see recommended bundles of VR hardware, Steam boxes and the Steam controller.

Comment: Re:Current.... melt (Score 1) 227

by marcansoft (#46685951) Attached to: Nanodot-Based Smartphone Battery Recharges In 30 Seconds

It's 2Ah, so 240A.

Now, it could be that their battery runs at a higher voltage (and thus not really 2Ah, but they're using that figure as a 3.7V li-ion equivalent capabity), or that there is a power converter built into the battery pack (unlikely for a prototype, though). Still, even for a 37V battery (vs. 3.7V for a normal Li-Ion cell), we're talking 24A. That cord didn't look like 24A cord, and I highly doubt they were using a voltage higher than 37V to charge (especially not with exposed banana jacks like that).

I call the demo highly dubious if not an outright fake/mock.

Comment: Mozilla is not a public company (Score 1) 564

by asa (#46671835) Attached to: Was Eich a Threat To Mozilla's $1B Google "Trust Fund"?

Mozilla is not a public company. It is a 501C3 tax exempt non profit and its wholly owned taxable subsidiary. Our stockholders are the people of the world. Our decisions are based on maximizing the value of the Internet for the benefit of everyone everywhere, especially those who lack representation from the giant institutional multinational publicly traded corporations like Google, Apple, Facebook, and Microsoft.

Comment: Re:Hey (Score 5, Interesting) 80

by marcansoft (#46596519) Attached to: eBay Japan Passwords Revealed As Username+123456

Sorry for the threadjack, but this is yet another case of horrible security reporting.

From watching the video, what it seems happened here was that eBay chose phpBB for their community forum, but did not integrate its authentication system directly with eBay's on the server side. Instead, the site was set-up as a standalone system, and whoever implemented the integration had the bright idea of hardcoding the forum password for everyone as username+123456, and then just having the eBay login page issue a hidden POST request behind the scenes to authenticate users to the community forum section.

Thus, this allows anyone to trivially impersonate anyone else on the forum. It shouldn't have anything to do with the rest of the site, though. Nor does this have anything to do with initial passwords, salts, or any of the other terms that have been thrown around.

A case of absolutely retarded login integration for the community site, but not something that would allow people to take over others' main eBay account. What this says about the people running eBay is another matter entirely...

The meat is rotten, but the booze is holding out. Computer translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak."

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