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Submission + - .NET or Java: Which Road to Take? 5

jerbenn writes: I have recently decided to make the move from being a generalist IT professional in government, currently involved in maintenance programming in several different languages, some project management, some admin work (both MS and Unix), user support, etc., to strictly development. I have two opportunities; one consisting as a Java Web Developer, the other being an ASP.NET Web Developer primarily using VB 2005. Considering that the benefits/corporate culture are fairly equal, and forgetting the "Do what makes you happy" philosophy, what do you think is the best alternative? Looking into the future, which of the 2 development environments will offer the most stability, marketability, and personal growth? What do you think Slashdot Community?

Submission + - Wired.com says geeks make better lovers

christian.einfeldt writes: "Let it never be said that geeks are not hot. As in sexy hot. So says none other than sex expert Regina Lynn, the sex-tech goddess who writes Wired.com's weekly 'Sex Drive' column. In this week's installment, Regina explains why geeks can put a new twist on the 'Field of Dreams' quip that 'if you build it, he will come:'

'Don't be surprised if your geek lover puts more thought into arranging the boudoir than you do, or if common household items soon take on a new dimension. More than one geek has told me that Home Depot is their favorite adult store.'
If you can imagine it, you can build it, and who has more fertile imaginations for tool and toy building than Slashdot readers?"

Submission + - Questioning the Value of an IT Degree

jerbenn writes: "The following article appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education: "With interdisciplinary training all the rage in the IT industry, computer-science degrees just don't seem to carry the weight they once did. According to a new survey, three out of five British employers don't care whether applicants for high-tech jobs have IT-specific degrees. The survey — completed by E-Skills UK, a government agency — also found that only two of every five IT workers in Britain possess tech-related degrees. Karen Price, chief executive of E-Skills UK, told CNET News that applicants without IT degrees are often perceived as better entrepreneurs and communicators than their tech-trained counterparts."

What's this world coming to??? It's starting to sound like companies would rather hire someone who can't differentiate between a semaphore and a hole-in-their-ass as long as they have so called 'soft-skills'. Yes, those soft skills are important, but they can be developed much easier than learning the theory and skills needed for innovation and development, not to mention maintaining existing technology!"

Saliva causes cancer, but only if swallowed in small amounts over a long period of time. -- George Carlin