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Do Nice Engineers Finish Last In Tough Times? 613

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the nice-guys-always-finish-last dept.
jammag writes "As the wave of pink slips is starting to resemble Robespierre and his guillotine, the maneuvering among tech professionals to hang on to their job is getting ugly. IT Management describes the inter-office competition between the manager of a server farm and the supervisor of networks and security. One was nice, giving his team members credit, taking responsibility when something went wrong. The other was a backstabber who spent plenty of time sucking up to the management. As the inevitable cuts came, who do you think hung on to their job?"

Comment: That's an interesting point. (Score 1) 426

by jeffs72 (#26293039) Attached to: Google Tells Users To Drop IE6

The problem with Open Source's initiative is that it expects people to care.

It's all about choice right? Well, most people don't care enough to make a choice. Hell, most people don't care enough to vote for who leads the United States, you expect them to give a crap about which browser they use?

Heck, I don't care. I have a wife and 2 kids to deal with. How can I expend brain cycles caring which browser I read a web page with?

Anyone have a good reason why I (or anyone) should care? I can see security, but Internet Exploder and $afari and Kram and Firefux are all the same in that regard at this point.

Browse the web without ads? Who cares, my eyes aren't so sensitive that a Ford ad on their new car is going to damage my rarified retinas.

See, that's the problem, it's all about choice, and the vast majority of the world doesn't care.

At least, that's how I see it.

United States

Classified US Intel Budget Revealed Via Powerpoint 364

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the woops-they-did-it-again dept.
Atario writes "In a holdover from the Cold War when the number really did matter to national security, the size of the US national intelligence budget remains one of the government's most closely guarded secrets. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the highest intelligence agency in the country that oversees all federal intelligence agencies, appears to have inadvertently released the keys to that number in an unclassified PowerPoint presentation now posted on the website of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). By reverse engineering the numbers in an underlying data element embedded in the presentation, it seems that the total budget of the 16 US intelligence agencies in fiscal year 2005 was $60 billion, almost 25% higher than previously believed."
Censorship

Australian Teachers Try To Shut Down Website 441

Posted by samzenpus
from the teachers-leave-them-kids-alone dept.
DeathElk writes "New South Wales teachers are attempting to have a website based in the United States closed down due to "defamatory" content. The site in question encourages students to rate teachers at their school, which obviously results in some colorful content. Now the story has hit the media, with some insightful quotes such as "The president of the NSW Secondary Principals Council, Jim McAlpine, said the Federal Government should block access to 'scurrilous American websites'."

YouTube Finds Signing Rights Deals Frustrating 172

Posted by Zonk
from the shouldn't-have-gone-legit dept.
Carl Bialik from WSJ writes "YouTube executives are finding it a slog to get all of the necessary permissions to license the songs and shows users are putting on the popular site, the Wall Street Journal reports. 'YouTube or its partners must locate parties ranging from studios to actors, and from music composers to the owners of venues, and get them to sign off. Where they don't succeed, YouTube risks being hit with lawsuits or having to take popular content down. "It's such a mess because the [entertainment companies] have all of these valuable assets that are just locked up with so many people who need to sign off on them," says YouTube Chief Executive Chad Hurley. "I don't know what it requires, if the government needs to be involved," Mr. Hurley laughs. "I don't know."'"

Will the U.S. Lose Control of the Internet? 553

Posted by Zonk
from the could-be dept.
MattSparkes writes "The first UN-sponsored Internet Governance Forum (IGF) meeting is taking place next week in Athens, which aims to 'contribute to a better understanding of how the internet can be used to its full potential.' It is likely that several countries will object to the US monopoly on Internet governance, as they did at the last meeting, where the US cited fears of a loss of freedom of speech as the reason for retaining power. Other topics to be discussed include online security, access for non-English users and spam."

Wi-Fi Exploits Coming to Metasploit 50

Posted by Zonk
from the wi-fi-sploitz dept.
bucksDrop writes "Eweek.com is reporting that the Metasploit Project will add 802.11 (Wi-Fi) exploits to a new version of its point-and-click attack tool. Metasploit 3 will integrate kernel-mode payloads to allow users to use existing user-mode payloads for both kernel and non-kernel exploits. Metasploit is collaborating with Jon 'Johnny Cache' Ellch and implementing it by wrapping the LORCON library."

Google Launches Website Optimizer 66

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the yet-another-fine-google-service dept.
Rockgod writes "Google Analytics Senior Manager Brett Crosby unveiled the tool, called Google Website Optimizer, this morning at the eMetrics summit in Washington D.C. If you find web site traffic heat maps like CrazyEgg, ClickDensity or Google Analytics' own heat map interesting, this looks like the next generation of that kind of tool. If Google's Website Optimizer can score high on usability, I expect it to be a big hit with small and medium size website publishers."

Microsoft Piracy Plan Means Concerns for IT 278

Posted by Zonk
from the think-this-one-through dept.
coondoggie writes to mention an article on Information Week about possible unintended consequences of the Microsoft Software Protection Plan (SPP) discussed on Slashdot on Wednesday. The new initiative is intended to protect consumers from pirated software, but may cause major headaches for IT shops. From the article: "Microsoft will support SPP in current and future reporting and asset management tools such as System Center Operations Manager. 'On paper it might sound pretty good, but we have to see how it works,' says Jeff Allred, manager of network services for the Duke University Cancer Center. One of his concerns is that a reduced functionality mode kicks in three days after changing out a motherboard in a server if the software is not revalidated. 'That really jumped out at me. We change out motherboards in our servers all the time,' he says. The provision only covers a swap with a non-OEM motherboard, which Allred admits doesn't happen often."

Lego Mindstorms + Lasers 122

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the robots-with-friggin-lasers dept.
hamsan writes "My brother just hacked a laser pointer into an NXT light sensor and fully documented the process. From the page — 'Total Project Cost — $16.99 plus shipping. Time Required — Approximately 2 hours of tinkering. Having an Alpha Rex with a Laser — Priceless!' Of course, the usual warnings about voiding warranties and avoiding lasers apply."

Calif. AG Files Felony Charges In HP Probe 171

Posted by kdawson
from the how-low-the-mighty dept.
PreacherTom writes, "Former Hewlett-Packard Chair Patricia Dunn, along with 'ethics chief' Kevin Hunsaker and others, was indicted yesterday on four felony counts by the California Attorney General. The charges, including wire fraud and conspiracy, carry a maximum penalty of 12 years in prison and $30,000 in fines. The indictments follow on the heels of an HP investigation of internal leaks that conducted "bugged" emails to C-Net reporter Dawn Kawamoto, illicitly obtained hundreds of phone numbers, and spied on HP board members." One of the indictments was for a private investigator retained by HP. The article has links to the complaints and warrants.

Take your work seriously but never take yourself seriously; and do not take what happens either to yourself or your work seriously. -- Booth Tarkington

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