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Comment: two words: virtual desktops (Score 1) 208

by jdeking1 (#40944279) Attached to: GNOME Developers Lay Out Plans for GNOME OS

Honestly, I'm in the market for just a plain 1:1 ripoff of win7's interface. It's minimalistic, flows well and allows me to get shit done. That is all.

My wife and I picked up a pair of identical Toshiba notebooks last year, preloaded (of course) with Windows 7. Our old machines were just that, old (7 and 8 years, respectively). Windows 7 was attractive and functional, a great step up from XP (her OS) and a lot prettier than XFCE (my preferred desktop on my ancient Dell).

What I found lacking in Win7 was virtual desktops. I had been using them for 11 years with CDE on Solaris (at work) and various flavors of Linux with Gnome, XFCE or KDE (at home), and I find virtual desktops incredibly helpful. Virtual desktops make my life easier. It seems like Microsoft should have been able to implement them by now.

Anyway, within a month I had installed Linux Mint 12 with KDE on my new notebook. I had virtual desktops back. It still bugs me, when I have occasion to use my wife's machine, that there is only one desktop in Windows.

Comment: Re:Excellent news (Score 1) 328

by jdeking1 (#40944099) Attached to: Debian Changes Default Desktop From GNOME To XFCE

XFCE will be the default for the CD iso only. Gnome will be on the DVD. And this is a good thing; any machine that only has a CD drive and can't read DVD's (like my ancient Dell Inspiron 1100, that I only keep around for emergencies) probably would not perform well with a heavy DE like Gnome. I settled on XFCE for that machine because Gnome3 was a serious PITA for me. I use KDE on my much newer and much more powerful quad-core laptop.

Bear in mind, the XFCE decision is not, AFAIK, set in stone yet. There's still discussion going on about it.

Comment: Inductive sensors and bicycles (Score 1) 328

by jdeking1 (#32471396) Attached to: Traffic-Flow Algorithm Can Reduce Fuel Consumption

Odd. I rarely have trouble with inductive sensors when riding a bicycle, so long as the traffic allows me to ride over the sensor loops. They will usually trip even though my bike has an aluminum frame.

Try riding along one side of the loop. That extends your time within the sensor's effective range. I have found that technique necessary in particular intersections.

Note to city planners: you can put those sensor loops in paved bike trails too, so it is safer to cross intersecting streets. It's been done in Tallahassee and probably other places as well.

Comment: Re:Lenovo (Score 1) 583

by jdeking1 (#29925871) Attached to: Who Installs the Most Crapware?

Back around 2003, I bought an HP mini-tower for gaming (I was using Mandrake Linux on my other tower and my laptop). There was some crapware, to be sure, but what really upset me was the fact that the HD was 48% fragmented on first boot! Easy to fix, but your average luser would just complain about how slow their new box was. The disk should never have left the factory in that condition.

Nevertheless I would gladly buy another HP. Right now I have a Dell laptop that my dad gave me because it was getting old and had always been slow. I added 512MB of memory (proprietary and hard to find - thanks Dell!) for $30 and now it is pretty snappy for a six-year-old dinosaur.

I would never buy a Dell, though. Too many idiosyncrasies and outright failures encountered over the years - from the DOS days to the present - from both user and IT points of view.

Bug

Journal: Daily Headline Mailings

Journal by jdeking1

Over the past few days, the formatting of the Slashdot Daily Headlines mailings has gone a bit funky. The description of each story has a blank line before the link, and the next description begins on the next line after the link. I'm sure others have noticed this as well ... at least I hope it isn't only me.

With all the fancy scientists in the world, why can't they just once build a nuclear balm?

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